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In connection with the moderator elections, we are holding a Q&A thread for the candidates.

Questions collected from an earlier thread have been compiled into this one, which shall now serve as the space for the candidates to provide their answers.

Not every question was compiled - we selected the top 9 questions due to there being a tie for the 8th place between two questions that both were nifty enough. This, along with our usual 2 questions, totals up to 11 questions.

As a candidate, your job is simple - post an answer to this question, citing each of the questions and then post your answer to each question given in that same answer. For your convenience, I will include all of the questions in quote format with a break in between each, suitable for you to insert your answers. Just copy the whole thing after the first set of three dashes.Please consider putting your name at the top of your post so that readers will know who you are before they finish reading everything you have written, and also including a link to your answer on your nomination post.

Once all the answers have been compiled, this will serve as a transcript for voters to view the thoughts of their candidates, and will be appropriately linked in the Election page. Candidates are also encouraged to include a link to their questionnaire response on their nomination, if room permits.

Good luck to all of the candidates!

Oh, and when you've completed your answer, please provide a link to it after this blurb here, before that set of three dashes. Please leave the list of links in the order of submission.

To save scrolling here are links to the submissions from each candidate (in order of submission):


  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

  2. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

  3. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

  4. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

  5. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

  6. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

  7. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

  8. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

  9. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

  10. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

  11. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

  • 1
    Hey Grace! There doesn't seem to be a link to this from the nominations page. Is that intentional? – Catija Mar 12 '18 at 20:40
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    It's intentional in the sense that I put the link there and didn't hit "Save changes" until just now. – Grace Note Mar 12 '18 at 21:13
  • 2
    lol dat passive aggressive edit removing the announcer badge target ;) – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 12 '18 at 22:36
  • 11
    It's really strange to see that while all the answers are basically cookie cutter (not meant insulting at all, I mean all good mods will have very similar answers, nobody expects someone to go "I'll kill'em all muaahaha!!!1 Give me teh modz!" all of a sudden) they vary that much by voting. I wonder how much of that voting is actually the associated name, not the content of the post. – nvoigt Mar 13 '18 at 15:58
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    To push that further, I actually wonder how come every year one of the questions is used up so that everyone can repeat, again, "something something license dissociation something something". Why do people vote for that? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 13 '18 at 19:28
  • @nvoigt or how one year a question can be used in the questionnaire and two years later it's downvoted. Exact same content. – Yvette Colomb Mar 13 '18 at 22:52
  • 6
    @YvetteColomb Meta is meta, next election I will try to ask candidates to write a short poem, These meta post becomes wall of text; we need something more relaxing – Petter Friberg Mar 15 '18 at 7:11
  • @PetterFriberg Yes, you are right :D Remember when we used to have poetry in the SOCVR? – Yvette Colomb Mar 15 '18 at 7:13
  • 1
    @YvetteColomb Did somebody mention poetry? – DavidG Mar 16 '18 at 0:46
  • 1
    @DavidG You are mentioned in poetry – Yvette Colomb Mar 16 '18 at 2:30
  • How does GDPR and Question 2 interact? – Andrew Mar 16 '18 at 12:44
  • 1
    @Andrew Users can request to be disassociated from content, that's been a thing for a long time now. – DavidG Mar 16 '18 at 13:51
  • Can someone push me the link for the primary vote please? I have some 7 names already. Thanks. – hans-könig Mar 20 '18 at 3:13
  • 4
    I find the questionnaire a little difficult to read... In my mind, the best way is by comparing the answers to single questions for the different candidates. But with all the complete posts together I find myself spending hours on this page scrolling... Is there a way to have a better visualization for the answers? – Matteo Ragni Mar 20 '18 at 8:59
  • I hope the next moderators can cooperate each other. Best Wishes – Santosa Sandy Mar 22 '18 at 4:40

13 Answers 13

256

I'm ArtOfCode, and these are my answers.


  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

There's a certain satisfaction to be had about quietly handling the unhandleable, mundane, or downright objectionable situations that get thrown up in flags. While the work on flags is monotonous to an extent, from what I hear there's still plenty of variety to be had in the flag queue. Sick of close voting? Handling some voting rings instead! Fed up with robo-reviewers? Take it out on the rude comments!

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

It always sounds harsh, but the TL;DR response is "should've thought of that". If we were talking about a negatively-received question, then deleting it wouldn't be a great loss. However, this situation is about a question that multiple people have spent non-trivial time answering; deleting it would be tantamount to punishing the answerers for the lack of forethought of the asker.

There are options that work around this, namely post dissociation, which we can let the author know about if they're worrying about it having an impact on them. Those options aren't immediate, but they're a good compromise for everyone involved.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

So... this actually happened. Over on Hardware Recommendations, this situation played out almost verbatim - we had a user who had a bit of a rocky start, but got to writing excellent content - but, they took issue with a lot of the decisions I made, and many meta posts ensued.

I mostly left it alone. Obviously constructive meta posts are, uh... constructive, and I responded to those - "Thanks, that was a mistake, fixed it" or "That's a good point, I'll keep it in mind in future". The less constructive posts, though, I pretty much stayed out of. That's why we have moderator teams - so that one moderator isn't taking all the decisions and turning out like a dictator. The other mods on the team can come up with a response that isn't affected by personal differences, and we can move forward from there.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Let's have two of 'em.

  • Answer: "Moderator attention needed"
    This is a good demonstration of a reasonable person having a reasonable misunderstanding, and bringing it to meta with a reasonable explanation, so that I could give them a reasonable response about my reasons for closing their seemingly-reasonable questions. Sound reasonable?

    (In other words, a new user asked a few questions without a good understanding of our scope, and asked on meta when they got closed. I gave an explanation of why I closed them unilaterally, and everyone went home happy.)

  • Question: "What can we do about technical support questions?"
    In which I notice that Hardware Recommendations has an issue with technical support questions, and solicit community input on how to proceed.

    This was something that affected the whole community, and that the whole community could help with as opposed to it being a moderator-specific thing. I wrote the original answer thinking about a different topic, but when I read it back I figured that I should pose a question about it so that everyone could pitch in. Community input is a wonderful thing for situations like this.

You can also see how I handle less fun situations, if you want to.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

Just for once, I'm going to have this cake and eat it. The two options presented here aren't mutually exclusive, and may not even be the best choices depending on what the question is.

Voting, firstly, is a personal choice thing - even as a moderator. If I think the question is a good one, then I'm going to upvote it regardless of what actions I take later.

From there, it's really a judgement call. If it's salvageable, then editing is the obvious course of action, perhaps along with a comment or two to ask for necessary additional information. This is really nothing that anyone in the community can't do - it doesn't have to be a moderator.

Unless it's really clear-cut, I'll leave closure to the community. SO has more than enough close-voters to take care of that itself, so I'll make what improvements I can and let the community decide from there. Again, that's not a mod-specific thing - anyone can do it.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

Ah, the fun question. I (like, I suspect, many others) am going to dispute the premise of this question.

Stack Overflow doesn't function in "batches" (for want of a better word). We don't have, say, 100k users who come in at the start of the year, stay for a year, and leave, and then we start all over again next year. It's a continuous thing - users are coming and going all the time, at all rep levels.

For that reason alone, moderation is simultaneously a constant and an ever-changing job. While the amount of content you have to moderate is roughly constant (okay, slowly increasing), the variety of it is infinite. Whether you think Stack Overflow is young or mature, useful or obsolete, you still have to have a flexible and open approach to its content and its community as a moderator. That's what I'll be doing - not taking any particular side but the side that says "what's best for us, the community"?

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user. What will you do?

Context, context, context. (Can I answer all moderation questions with that sentence?) You can only effectively moderate any given situation once you know the context. If this is a user who's asked one or two poorer questions and/or the flagger is overreacting? A comment is the right course of action - let the author know what we need from them, and give them the resources and opportunity to improve. (I could also send some optional feedback to the flagger about their level of zeal.) If, on the other hand, the user has been asking terrible questions for years, then we're going to have a chat - via either actual chat or via a mod message - that, while still friendly, says "this needs to stop pronto".

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

Behaviour? Everything the policies say and more. You're not just a user now; you're one of the most visible and distinctive users on the site; you hold power over others and are expected to be as close to perfect as is humanly possible to be. That's... not even that much of an exaggeration.

In terms of how you moderate, the single most important thing in my opinion is to be able to accept that you're wrong. (Or, conversely, to not be pig-headedly stubborn.) If you can do that, then you can fix most things even if you get them wrong to start with.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

Negative reception to a meta post isn't a personal affront; it's just a statement that the community disagrees with your position on a certain thing. While this is technically a benevolent dictatorship, our custom brand of democracy works excellently, and that involves - as I've said - accepting when you're wrong and respecting the will of the community.

And no, disossication is not an option for me. While I fully believe in owning my actions as a regular user, as a moderator it's even more important to leave that record of what happened, when, why, who, and all the details.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

A standard answer for a standard question: Be Nice is not an optional policy. While users who generate good content are important, there are a lot of them on Stack Overflow, and it's not worth sacrificing other good users so that we can tiptoe around their argumentative ways. This user gets their comments deleted, followed by the standard mod-message and suspension escalation flow.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Can I amend my request to answer all questions with "Context"? I'd like to add on "Communication" as an alternative answer...

In this situation, you go talk to the moderator in question. You resolve your dispute like the mature humans you are, and you come up with a resolution that can be put into place. If that doesn't work out, it can always be written up on meta so that the community can weigh in as well.


Phew!

  • 17
    Glad to see you running! You always, to me, seem relatively cool-headed on Meta, and you have experience as a mod elsewhere in the network. Good luck, I think you'd be a great SO mod! – Kendra Mar 12 '18 at 22:00
  • 4
    Moderating multiple sites can be tricky. As we've seen with different meta posts from different sites, each one wants to do their own thing. If this community has agreed to do something differently than the other communities you moderate, will you be prone to follow the other standards that you are already used to and agree with, or would you be able to separate the two and perform what each community wants and expects? In other words, are you willing to put on multiple hats for each site and perform to each of your community's expectations and standards? – K.Dᴀᴠɪs Mar 13 '18 at 2:38
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    @K.Dᴀᴠɪs I moderate two sites with completely opposing charters regarding recommendation questions - Stack Overflow and Software Recommendations (and previously Hardware Recommendations, one of Art's other sites). It's not really an issue in practice. If anything, you're more discerning on each community because you don't build the "recommend me" -> "close" muscle memory. – Undo Mar 13 '18 at 2:59
  • 3
    There's a comment under my nomination about that, @chade_, but always worth repeating here too: I have (somehow) inordinate amounts of free time. Open Source and Hardware Recs take barely any time daily to moderate (maybe 30 minutes combined, if that), so I have plenty available to moderate on SO. – ArtOfCode Mar 13 '18 at 9:31
  • 12
    Given your low participation here (among other things, you've only cast ~1k votes in ~4 years, substantially less than 1 per day) why exactly do you want to be a moderator on this site? – Josh Caswell Mar 14 '18 at 1:01
  • 4
    Because there's a moderation hole that needs filling, @JoshCaswell, and I believe (and have been told by a few SO mods) that I'm a good choice to help fill it. I know I don't do much visible stuff (voting especially - you hit the nail there), which is something I need to work on, but I am here quite a bit, quietly lurking. – ArtOfCode Mar 14 '18 at 10:58
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    Thanks for replying. I can't vote for someone who just wants to be a mod, but doesn't particularly care about the site. Regardless of the existing mods' opinions. That said, best of luck. – Josh Caswell Mar 14 '18 at 13:05
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    To be completely frank, the thing that worries me here about your run for moderator is it's based on your network activities and not your SO activities. Your participation on SO is not notable. Your network participation is. Wouldn't it be better to increase your network activity and then run for mod, rather than say, I'll increase it when I'm a mod? Why do you think you're different than other candidates over the years, in that you do not need a high candidate score? – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 '18 at 19:24
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    @YvetteColomb I don't. I, like a number of others, dislike candidate scores. They're a guide, but they're not an accurate assessment of a potential moderator. I don't want to toot my own horn more than necessary, but I believe I have the temperament, the knowledge, and the ability to be a good moderator - and that applies no matter what my candidate score is. – ArtOfCode Mar 14 '18 at 19:27
  • 13
    @YvetteColomb Candidate score is an indicator of specific aspects of site involvement. There are plenty of ways to be involved in a site without ever touching your candidate score. – ArtOfCode Mar 14 '18 at 19:32
  • 6
    I disagree with Yvette but I'm afraid her general sentiments will be reflected in the mindless horde of zombies that determines the ultimate outcome of the mod elections :( – Andras Deak Mar 14 '18 at 22:14
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    Blaming "mindless zombies" for election results is not particularly constructive, @AndrasDeak. There's just as likely to be "zombies" voting for the result you want as against. "People who disagree with me are mindless" is a well-known cognitive bias. – Josh Caswell Mar 15 '18 at 12:47
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    Just to add my 2 cents to debate. If John Skeet signed up with a new account tomorrow and applied for mod after 4k reputation - would you say he wasn't eligible to be a moderator due to his lack of badges/reputation? @ArtOfCode has been an active contributor to SO for a long time, but "contribution" comes in many forms. – Sam Mar 15 '18 at 15:51
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    If this person is indeed a good mod candidate for Stack Overflow, then I would like to vote for them, but right now I have absolutely no reason to think that other than some comment endorsements from various other users. And I'm not going to vote based on that. – Josh Caswell Mar 16 '18 at 12:39
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    @AndrasDeak "number of reviews done are far more important for me than rep in general" Okay...well, Art has around 4 reviews per day if we count since getting close votes, or far, far less since the base review queue privilege. So I'm still not sure what I'm supposed to be looking at... :/ – Josh Caswell Mar 16 '18 at 22:48
160

I'm Rob! Please see my nomination here.

I'll try to keep my answers as brief and direct as possible as there's a lot of text for people to read through here. If you feel some important points have been glossed over, or want clarification, please don't hesitate to leave a comment on my answer.

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I've been involved with primarily moderation duties for about two years now, and I've yet to get bored of it.

In fact, almost all my time on Stack Overflow relates to moderation duties. I'm a room owner in SOBotics, and a reviewer in Charcoal. I've written UserScripts and tools in the past which focus entirely around moderation.

Suffice to say, I'm simply interested in moderation and keeping the site clean. The flag queue likely will never be empty, but I sure hope to make a significant dent in it.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No. Doing so would invalidate the hard work of each of the answerers to the question. Everything posted to Stack Exchange is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0. If required, the post may be disassociated from the author.

It is the authors responsibility to only submit content they're happy with being public.

Using Stack Overflow to recieve answers and then actively trying to prevent future visitors from benefiting from the content goes against everything Stack Overflow stands for.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Constructive criticism it not only welcome; it's encouraged. I'm more than happy for my actions to be discussed, provided the discussion is constructive. Wherever possible, I'd provide my side of the story, and be as transparent as possible.

Rants against a particular user - moderator or not - are not acceptable. If the post cannot be edited into a respectable, constructive discussion, it should be removed. In order to preserve impartiality, I'd defer the moderation to other members of the moderation team, rather than take action myself.

The only case where I'd take action for disputes involving myself were if the content were plainly abusive. There is no circumstance where pure abuse is acceptable. I'd be sure to notify other moderators of my actions, so that it's clearly visible.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

In particular? Not really. While I visit meta nearly every single day in order to keep up with community decisions and initiatives; my visible participation is not the greatest.

However, there are a few posts which provide an insight into how I present myself:

Otherwise, there's also my activity stream on meta to give you an idea of how I conduct myself.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

Moderators are expected to lead by example - infact, it's one of the primary criteria for becoming a moderator. If I were confident that the content were suitable of Stack Overflow, I'd be more than happy vote against the community.

I would not cast a close vote based on the opinion of other users. There are plently of community members around to handle this themselves.

If it were a good question, but poorly worded or formatted, I'd have no issue editing it into shape - no different than I do now.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

I'm going to somewhat disagree with the premise of the question; I don't think we all know that Stack Overflow is near its completion. I'd likely argue the opposite.

Anyway, to address the concern about new users not being aware of the way Stack Overflow works; I fully agree. There is a problem with the perception of Stack Overflow, and the discrepency between what new users think the site is for, and what the site is actually for.

I think communication and education is extremely important here.

There have been a few initiatives started by Stack Exchange to address this, but I don't believe we're quite there yet. Namely:

  1. The Mentorship research project which I was a part of. This had much better results than I was expecting, and was truly a step in the right direction.
  2. The question template experiment which from the statistics, looks to be a great improvement.

As a moderator, our duty is not just to delete content and close questions. We should be leading by example, and guiding users to be productive members of the community. While I believe the model for Stack Overflow is the correct approach (that is, not loosening the constraints as to what denotes a 'good question'), we're surely lacking in the communication department.

I'd much rather guide new users who are making an effort onto the right path, rather than silently closing or deleting their question.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

As mentioned above, I firmly believe in trying to guide new users, rather than 'punishing' (as many users interpret it as) them for not fully grasping the idea of Stack Overflow.

I'd happily handle a flag like that by sending a message to the user, nudging them in the right direction. Don't get me wrong, though. There does come a point where a user, after continually ignoring the policies of the site, does become a problem... but I believe in assuming the best of users first.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

I like the phrasing of "What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute" more, so I'll address that.

  1. Being transparent in their actions. Moderators should be confident in their decisions, and should be happy to have them discussed in public. Taking actions in private does not paint a good picture of the moderation team in general.

  2. Treating users like humans. Assuming the best in people, even after dealing with countless disruptive/abusive flags. People usually have good intentions, and it's easy to lose track of their humanity when staring at a screen.

  3. Being level headed in discussions, and knowing when to remove themselves from the situation, so that other moderators can take over, if they find themselves unable to act objectively.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

There aren't really any meta posts I'm not proud of. Even content that may recieve a negative response, doesn't really negate whether or not I stand behind it.

If the answer is objectively wrong, I'd much rather delete it than have it hang around for future readers to be misled by. If it were merely badly received, I'd likely leave it around, if I felt it still provided useful input to the discussion.

There's never a time I'd ask for a post on meta to be dissociated from my account.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

To put it bluntly; there's never an excuse for being rude and disruptive on the site. It's just not acceptable. The fact that they're providing a large amount of useful content doesn't mean they can do whatever they want.

I'd handle it the same as any other user. You don't get to be a bully just because you also produce good content.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Communication.

I'd contact that moderator and ask them why they made the decision they did. Perhaps I missed something they didn't. If they made a mistake, I'm sure they'd be more than willing to reverse their decision. If I simply disagree with their course of action, there's no problem with raising a discussion with other moderators, or even on meta, if required.

  • 1
    Do you feel that your long history with SOBotics gives you a vast understanding on what it takes to moderate this site? Would you say that the experience you've gained over the years would help make you a better moderator? – K.Dᴀᴠɪs Mar 13 '18 at 8:59
  • 5
    @K.Dᴀᴠɪs Hopefully, yes. With SOBotics and Charcoal combined, I've been exposed to most of the underbelly of Stack Exchange, so I have a good understanding of what to expect when moderating. The members of both chat rooms are all equally as moderation-inclined as I am, so they've provided a good learning experience in terms of how to behave, and how to moderate efficiently with the tools I have. – Rob Mar 13 '18 at 9:18
  • 3
    That is a fine answer for question 6. Thanks for that. – rene Mar 14 '18 at 15:09
  • My vote goes to @rob . – Shree Mar 16 '18 at 5:27
  • 2
    I'm upvoting your hair. The rest of you can go along for the ride. – SqlZim Mar 19 '18 at 21:17
  • I upvoted you, excepting you will not criticized new beginners and supporting for finding solution and by the way are you developing for UWP – Shubham Sahu Mar 20 '18 at 4:07
  • 1
    "It is the authors responsibility to only submit content they're happy with being public." - People are not robots, they make mistakes. I would like to see more thought on this than just disassociate or let the question stand as the only 2 options. – Ogre Psalm33 Mar 21 '18 at 13:43
  • Congrats. I came back to see if you and Yvette made and you both did. – Programmer Mar 28 '18 at 1:41
  • 1
    @Programmer Thank you! – Rob Mar 28 '18 at 1:41
  • My vote goes to @Rob – Abdullah Ilgaz Mar 28 '18 at 11:08
  • Where is my dent? ;-) Still 9k :(. – Nemo Apr 22 '18 at 15:57
  • 1
    @Nemo Haven't really had time to look at the close vote queue, but I can assure you the mod queue has significantly reduced from when we were elected :) – Rob Apr 24 '18 at 1:07
113

Floern here! With my answers to your questions:


  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I've been raising dozens of flags daily during the last 2 years, and I'm still looking at dozens of posts per day to check whether they might need moderator attention. But the moderation tasks are not that one-sided anyway, they are diverse enough to switch to a completely different task when I'm worn out doing one.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

Delete? No. Removing content others have put much effort in is not something we should do. They shouldn't have posted it in the first place if it might cause trouble. As per the ToS SE doesn't have to delete the user's content since they granted SE the right to publish their content. But, the asker may request his question to be disassociated from their account. Also, if possible, the question might be edited in such a way that it doesn't change its meaning but is different enough (from their homework) not to cause any trouble.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'm open for criticism; if I'm doing something wrong please tell me, preferably on Meta, so I can also get feedback from the community. I'm happy to adjust my actions according to the community consensus.

If it's something critical, or something that has no community consensus, I might have to discuss it with other mods.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Most of my meta posts are either bug reports or answers to general support questions. But here are some link-worthy posts:

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

The question might have several issues that could be fixed by editing. If I can make the question more clear I'd do so. We don't want to lose useful content just because its packaging got a few dents in it.

Single-handedly closing or reopening a question is something I'd refrain from, unless it's a clear case. The community is usually better at deciding things in daily business than a single individual.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

The technological world, including the internet, is a fast growing and changing place. Stack Overflow has to adjust itself to cover the needs of the future. Stack Overflow looked different 8 years ago, and will surely have a different face in another 8 years. This concerns the content, the community, the mods, just everything that is part of the building blocks of this site.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Examples of flagged texts). What will you do?

The required action might vary for each case. Normally the community will take care of such users, by voting on their questions. The goal of Stack Overflow is to be a repository of high-quality questions and answers, and I will work towards this goal.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

A moderator has to be more careful with their actions in general, since they have more influence and authority. While some normal users might post comments that are just nice enough to not to get flagged, a moderator has to be as neutral and constructive as possible.

But then again, if you happen to cross a line or make a mistake, you can (and have to) fix it.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

I don't really have such posts, since I primarily write answers and reports. But I'd like to get corrected if I'm getting something wrong.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Assuming the comments regularly scratch at the Be Nice policy I might have to take further action. You cannot compensate bad behavior with good content. First I'd send a message telling them we don't tolerate their behavior and they should refrain from leaving such comments. If that does not help, I have to take more drastic measures, up until a suspension. While a suspension would cause the loss of an otherwise good contributor, they're not above our policies.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I'd ask them why they did it. Maybe I missed some detail that warranted their action. Getting into a close/reopen or delete/undelete war between mods certainly doesn't help. Depending on the impact of their action, I might do more or less against it: When they close an average question I probably won't insist much.

  • I voted for you because of the XKCD Browser, which I have been using for a few years now. – David Mar 23 '18 at 23:34
102

Baum mit Augen here (my nomination), let me answer your questions:

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I have spent a significant amount of time mostly reviewing-, but also devtime for better and faster reviewing on this site for far more than a few months.

Even if the life of a moderator was as monotonous as just handling NAA flags, I can deal with that without a problem. (Those messages are feedback to Bhargav Rao's bot, Natty, which reports potential new NAA/VLQ answers to old questions.)

I really see no problem for me going forward here.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

I would be very reluctant to destroy even mediocre valid answers, let alone "very good" ones. For one, deleting their work is not fair towards the answers' authors and their effort. Also, I don't like needlessly hiding the information they provided from future readers.

Instead, there are two things one can do to save both the asker and the content. For school work, it is probably enough to just disassociate the question from the asker's account.

Where that does not solve the problem, I would try to guide the asker in editing their question to be about the underlying programming problem instead of the specific assignment or piece of company code, for example, by replacing the offending code with a proper and abstract MCVE. Thus, we hopefully can get all of the problematic content out of the way while preserving the actual, useful programming knowledge.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'm not running because we need some revolutionary new ways of moderation, but because we need more of the great moderation we already have. If I do my job right, I'll just blend in with the current team.

So if some user, high rep or not, who is fine with the current moderation continuously finds issues with my actions, I'm doing it wrong.

To resolve the issue, I'd try to learn how to fix my "moderation style" from their and other feedback. Hopefully, that would not take "several weeks" to begin with.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

Some time ago, I came across this question. While I very much agreed with the idea of rescuing those hidden gems, I found that the actual results were not as good as they could be. In my answer, I explained what parts of the process need improvement (in my opinion) so we can do a better job next time. I also attracted the attention of a moderator and went ahead and reviewed all answers to those questions. As a result, the poor answers were removed and the hidden gems actually got the exposure they deserved.

The take away from this: we should always review our own actions, and if they don't fully achieve their goal, try and improve the results.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

I will not "trust my gut", nor will I take action simply "based on the opinion of these other reputable users."

Like I do now, I will take moderator actions if I know they are correct. So if I have sufficient domain knowledge to identify significant value in the question and to get it up to our quality standards, I will be happy to polish the gem. If I can judge the flags to be correct, I will act on them.

But for the bulk of questions, I would say the opinion of the domain experts reviewing them is more useful and valuable than the mod hammer.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

The core goal of our effort here is and always was to build a long-term, high quality Q/A repository for programming questions. I think this is a goal we can all agree on.

Now what that means for every specific post is, of course, subject to change as with everything in this world. This is nothing new, either; a lot of old and very well received questions would be off-topic today.

So to get to the point: I would work to preserve our core goal as stated above, but I would of course embrace the changes in how we define it in its details. As I don't see the community moderator as a political role, I will not try to do significant "shaping"; the direction we are heading is for Meta to decide. Whatever path we end up taking as a community, I will help to get where we want to go.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

This will of course depend on the specific case at hand. The average "help vampire" is effectively dealt with by automatic means, i.e. the question ban one receives when asking too many poorly received questions.

However, it is a known issue that some (rare) exceptional users managed to ask one or more questions that are sufficiently well received to prevent a ban (however the secret algorithm decides that). That's the category a user that "consistently asks poorly-researched questions" would fall into, I suppose. For those, a moderator flag seems like the correct tool, and after determining how much harm they are actually causing, I would take appropriate action. Though a simple heads-up in a mod message would hopefully be enough.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

Several things that come to mind follow from the criteria on the election page, like being "patient and fair" or leading by example, so I am not sure if you would count that as "unwritten".

But for starters, I would expect a moderator to be exceptionally constructive in comments. A moderator should strive to not even come close to be perceived as snarky or "trollish", which is (when looking at the reports by Queen) how a lot of the community's reactions are seen by askers. A moderator must keep their cool, not get angry or defensive, even after direct insults, and calmly resolve any heated situation.

Another big point is conflict of interest: we bestow a lot of power onto our moderators, which works because they are trusted to use it to the best of the site. It is thus essential that a moderator does not take any action that even could raise the suspicion they acted mainly in their own interest. They should stay away from Q/As that they have a stake in or flags that involve them when using their moderator tools whenever possible.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

Not really. Admittedly, I don't have a lot of Meta posts to begin with; I mostly read discussions here and express my opinion through votes.

If I had a very bad post though, I would not ask to disassociate it from my account. I would either admit I was wrong or stand by my unpopular opinion, but I would not try to "sneak out", but take full responsibility for my actions.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

First of all, I make sure that they actually are the problem. I personally have left 1000s of comments, most of them canned and carefully crafted to be constructive. Yet, I would be surprised if those haven't attracted a couple of dozen flags by users not happy about their posts being closed or deleted.

When we determined that it's actually the attitude of the user that causes the problems, we need to fix that some way or the other.

A reasonable chain of measures would be something like a simple warning at first to simply show them they act in an unacceptable way. If that is not enough, try and make him understand exactly why their behavior needs to change, with a discussion in chat, for example. If that fails, let another mod try with different words, maybe there's some culture barrier or something.

If all that fails, they should be stopped from contributing until they learn their lesson. No one is that awesome and useful content wise that we should allow them to create a toxic atmosphere in our community.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would have to feel fairly strongly about the question to doubt the other mod's action. In my experience on this site, they take their actions for good reasons.

If I did have a strong suspicion the action was incorrect, I would go and talk to the mod in question to eliminate the chances I missed something vital. Through that, we should arrive at some conclusion about how the content should be handled, and take appropriate action or leave it as is.

  • 11
    Good luck tree with eyes, nice to see you here again :) – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 '18 at 18:50
  • 2
    @YvetteColomb Thanks, you too! – Baum mit Augen Mar 14 '18 at 19:42
  • 7
    "A moderator must keep their cool, not get angry or defensive, even after direct insults": yeah, that's easier with the "delete comment" privilege than for us mere mortals :) Good luck, see you on SOCVR for more laughs. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 20:08
  • 2
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Actually, the bar for using that in a situation I'm somehow involved in would be very high; unless there is something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I'd wait for another mod. Thank you for the good luck, you too! – Baum mit Augen Mar 14 '18 at 22:48
  • 2
    FYI The link to this is missing from your stackoverflow.com/election post – msanford Mar 19 '18 at 20:05
  • 1
    @msanford Thanks, the problem is I hit the character limit on my nomination, so I had to post the link in a comment. – Baum mit Augen Mar 20 '18 at 13:12
  • 1
    @BaummitAugen Ah! Well I found it anyway. Perhaps an additional FYI: I, at least, don't see any comments on the answers on that post. – msanford Mar 20 '18 at 14:45
  • 1
    @msanford The comments are hidden after the nomination phase, if you go there, you'll find them. Let's hope the other people that care about this questionnaire also find it without a direct link. – Baum mit Augen Mar 20 '18 at 16:26
76

I am Stephen Rauch, and these are my answers to your questions.


  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

Well, my (slightly) OCD nature loves to try and bring order to the universe. I realize at the intellectual level, that reversing the 2nd law of thermodynamics is unlike to happen by my participation at Stack Overflow, but that does not mean that it is not fun to try.

In my time here I have done quite a few reviews, flags, edits and votes. And I am still enjoying it enough to have taken the time to write up these answers in hopes of becoming a moderator.

In my roughly 15 months on Stack Exchange I have done:

               SO      Total on Network
Reviews        16k     39k
Edits          3.6k    5.8k
Post Votes     4k      11.2k
Other Votes    3.4k    5.6k
Helpful Flags  2.4k    5.7k

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No

The user agreed to all content being licensed by CC BY-SA 3.0. In addition people have already spent time answering the question.

There are however some things that can be done:

  1. Disassociate the question from the user's profile.
  2. Remove any potentially identifying or sensitive information.

An edit responding to comments: Like every thing else in life, there is almost always a maybe. For things that are illegal, (DMCA comes to mind), those sorts of things would of course be removed. But not being moderator yet, my assumption is that those sorts of decisions would be deferred to SE staff.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Well first I would spend some time doing a little soul-searching, and careful reading of the posts in question. Then going forward use any wisdom gained from that. I would also ask fellow moderators their opinion on the subject. If I made a mistake, I would apologize for the same. If other moderators thought my actions were OK, I would then simply recuse myself from that user's activities for a while, in the hopes that situation would defuse over time.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I have not been super active on meta so I don't know that I have any that would best demonstrate my moderation style. I have a few meta posts on SO, and Meta as well as Unix and Linux and a couple other spots, for a total of only slightly over 30 posts.

I do not know how relevant this is to SO, but here is a meta post from another site I have been active on that I am proud of: Voting is Moderation, and we need more Moderation

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

Well first I would review the flags, assuming that is something the tooling allows, to try and make sure I wasn't missing something.

But, it has been my experience that the community reacts poorly to lazy questions (and rightly so, who has time to fix everything?). But that, in and of itself, does not mean that there is not an interesting nugget inside the mess. If I think I understand the topic and the intent well, and can spend the time necessary to turn it into a non-lazy question. Why, just because the community down voted the original, would I not fix the question?

Now if it was already closed, then it would need a higher bar before I would unilaterally reopen.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

From the voting on this question, evidently some people were not thrilled with the question, but I thought it fun.

Let's break it down:

As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things).

Uhhhh... No. But a compelling opener in that it likely raises some emotions.

The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel.

Hmmm... How would that work? This is a community. Do the moderation tools have a The-Great-Culling button? Is the expectation that the old timers are going to be evicted somehow? And if the new generation is gonna take the wheel, that is likely me, since I have not been here long. But, if taking this job somehow means removing those who are already doing it, then I'm not interested.

How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants.

I think the flood of new users is not new. Additionally, I view new users as potential future current inhabitants. Where their expectations don't align with the community's, it has been my experience that a well placed comment can elicit a positive response, and hopefully a little education goes a long way towards forging better participants in the future.

Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years?

Well, how about both? I do not see these as contradictory.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

I am not super familiar with the tooling in this regard, but I am under the impression that these sorts of things often take care themselves. Does it take a lot of poorly received questions to get question banned? According to this help article and this meta post, these things are automatic for relatively low seniority users.

Someone who has been around long enough that they have enough rep to get past any question bans, might respond positively to note from a moderator, but likely repeated downvoting has not already made an impression, how likely is it that a note would help?

I did respond on U&L meta to getting called out on a similar situation.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

I am afraid I do not have a good answer for this question. But I will say most everything flows from: Be Nice!

A couple of things that do not immediately fit under Be Nice! are be aware of conflicts of interest and be aware of privileged information. These however are all written someplace.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

No, I wouldn't ask for a poorly received post to be dissociated from my account.

I don't have any posts on SO meta that were negatively voted, but on some other sites I have some meta posts which received negative feedback. I don't believe this is a problem in and of itself. On meta, negative votes indicates a disagreement. Is every opinion I express expected to agree with everyone, all of the time?

I try to put forth reasonable opinions, and hopefully clear expressions of my thoughts on a topic. If that results in a genuine disagreement, I will spend time time reflecting on same, but I hope that even if I change my opinion based on feedback, I would still be willing to acknowledge where I was when I wrote the original post.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Be Nice is pretty simple. If the user is having trouble adhering to that I would try to advise the user why the behavior was not appreciated. If the behavior were to continue or had been on going when I got involved, then the policy, as I understand it, is to ban the user in increasing time increments until behavior constituting Be Nice is adhered to, or the ban is increased to permanent.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I would assume it was closed because of something I did not understand. I would therefore send a message and ask why, so that I could be educated. If after that, I still felt strongly that an error had been made, I might politely express my thoughts to the other mod, and then I would move on. Life is way too short to allow a difference of opinion, to lead to anything resembling acrimony, especially for something as trivial as a single question.

  • 5
    Most people nominate first and then post the Q&A :) – Jon Clements Mar 12 '18 at 20:44
  • @JonClements it nowhere says it is even mandatory to nominate, we're all candidates ... – rene Mar 12 '18 at 20:46
  • 9
    For answering question 6 in the right spirit, have my upvote. – rene Mar 12 '18 at 20:47
  • 2
    You would have scored more points if you referred to "The Great Cull Button" as "Carrousel" instead. :) – JohnP Mar 12 '18 at 20:51
  • 29
    @rene: stop trolling us mods with false hope of you nominating! – Martijn Pieters Mar 12 '18 at 21:30
  • 5
    Not sure I agree with the assertion of removing content. You're absolutely right, but there have been isolated cases in which the asker didn't have the permission to actually produce the content under CC-By-SA. I recall an instance in which someone had a Perl(?) answer deleted (and a lot of value was lost) because it was later revealed that the person asking the question had got into some hot water with legal(?) behind it. There are those 1% of cases in which it makes sense to delete questions. You can't blanket-state a position like that. – Makoto Mar 12 '18 at 21:41
  • 2
    The real question is why did you ask only one question. I cannot vote for someone who doesn't really know what it's like to be the one asking. – Knu Mar 23 '18 at 20:42
  • 1
    @Knu Not asking questions may mean that the person is here primarily to share their knowledge. As such, they would be subjected to (and gain experience of) the many different types of questions already on SO. I personally would value this higher (in moderator terms) than someone who has asked a lot of questions - indicating that they are primarily here to be helped rather than to help. – Peter Abolins Mar 26 '18 at 6:02
  • @PeterAbolins I am not asking for a reversed ratio obviously. A moderator needs to know what it's like. He has not enough experience on that part of the website which matters a lot in terms of UX. The effort put on those forms/pages have deep implications in terms of moderation at the end of the line. He cannot grasp it IMO. – Knu Mar 26 '18 at 22:37
  • @knu, I have asked 16 questions network wide if you include meta. Not sure at what threshold you would consider it to be enough... – Stephen Rauch Mar 27 '18 at 1:31
66

I'm vaultah, my nomination is here, and my answers are below this line:


  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

It's extremely unlikely that the moderator flag queue will be as unexciting and wearing to me as the majority of "normal" review queues.

Sure, even a single flag may take a big amount of time to handle correctly, but knowing that none of my efforts will go to waste will be enough to compensate for that. Certain types of flags processed by moderators require non-formulaic responses, investigation, direct communication with other moderators and community at large. My expectation is that all this will remain enjoyable (or at least interesting) for a long time, and cancel out the boring parts of the job.

Also: as I said in my nomination, I will keep participating in chat and the main site. "A change is as good as a rest", etc.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

According to this answer, all content users post on Stack Overflow is "perpetually and irrevocably licensed to Stack Exchange under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license". This gives Stack Overflow (the company) the right to use it in practically any way they see fit, and the policy is to avoid deleting useful content.

Unless the question is an obvious duplicate and/or does not belong on the site, in which case I would be more inclined to delete it, I would first check whether the personally identifiable information can be scrapped from the question and its answers while preserving the original meaning. In most cases it should be both possible and sufficient. Diamond moderators also have the ability to delete edit history, to hide the fact that such edit took place. That said, although this will hide sensitive information from future visitors of Stack Overflow, countless real-time scrapers and the Wayback Machine may keep it indefinitely.

The question owner may send a disassociation request, whereas (depending on the circumstances) representatives of schools and employers may want to send a complete takedown notice, but handling of such requests falls outside of the jurisdiction of diamond moderators.

It's hard to predict all the intricacies at this point, but the short general answer is "No".

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I welcome and accept constructive feedback, and criticism to the tune of one post per day would be a little much for me to write off and continue moderating as usual.

A right decision would be to step back for a couple of days, before I'm a liability to the mod team, and revisit FAQ pages, recent changes in policy, and other stuff that I might have missed/forgotten. Hopefully this will help me make fewer mistakes in the future, assuming I'm not kicked out by the time I come back.

I would respond to the first few constructive posts myself, but let other moderators and CMs impartially handle rants and other posts, should they keep appearing.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

No, I'm not proud of any of my posts, but I think they are very okay on average. I like how this post is going so far, though.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

I wish these questions were more specific... What is the user's history on SO? How useful or interesting is the question? What kind of flags? How familiar am I with the subject of the question? Is this question a target of organized voting?

Some general points:

  • I sure won't disregard the opinion of reputable users OR rely on it entirely
  • I will voice my opinion in comments
  • I will override the community if the voting/discussion around the question isn't healthy, and other exceptional cases
  • I may edit the question before or after it's closed
  • If it ends up in the Reopen queue -- good
  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

Stack Overflow is pretty mature, but it will be complete when the technology stops evolving (i.e. never). It's still entirely possible for users to get reputation by asking and answering questions about new programming languages, new features or standards of older languages, frameworks, IDEs, and libraries.

Most of new users do have different expectations and learn about the site rules the hard way, after their question is already closed or their answer is already in the LQP queue. I can't blame them for not reading all the complicated scattered rules and guidelines prior to the first post, nor can I blame experienced users (not moderators) for not explaining their close- and downvotes for the Nth time.

I'm firmly against big changes to the fundamental principles of Stack Overflow, but I support small tweaks to policies and moderation tools, better and concise wording of rules, more canned comments, automatic warnings, etc.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

Mark the flag as helpful, leave a comment with a warning under the post that was flagged, downvote, expect the user to be question-banned soon.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

A moderator should not

  • perform significant moderation actions (closure/deletion) without leaving comments (canned comments are fine)
  • moderate in a hurry
  • have biases, but that's impossible
  • disclose or promote their political views on the site, or use the site to push their social agendas
  • overmoderate
  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

I tried, but I still can't imagine a situation where I would consider a dissociation request because of a negative feedback. Any attempts to hide evidence would be immature-ish and frankly pointless, and would only add fuel to the fire.

In 2014 I complained about the error that I got when I tried to direct a user to LMGTFY. On top of the initial wording being arrogant, I failed to do my own research. Someone posted a LMGTFY link in a comment to my question, and gosh that was humiliating. I flagged that comment, the flag quickly got declined, and I flagged it again. Ugh. That had everything I would not have done today.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

They seem to violate one of the more important site rules, requiring all users to "be nice". I would start with a comment or mod message, followed by a series of increasingly long suspensions, if they continue. If they stopped answering a while ago and nowadays mainly use their account for toxic comments, I would escalate faster.

One contributor does not compensate for the long-term damage to the site image that may follow as a (indirect) result of their actions. Stack Overflow already doesn't have a reputation of a perfect place anyway.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Certainly I would not confront them publicly. As I see it, the team of moderators is supposed to behave consistently and as one, with no apparent contradictions or public arguments between its members.

I'll bring this up in the "blue room" and listen to feedback from them and other moderators. If the closure/deletion/etc was indeed incorrect, I would suggest that that mod reopens/undeletes/unetcs the question themselves -- that will look less ugly.

  • 2
    What are your views about users who habitually answer questions in the comments - do you intend to influence this behaviour? If so, how? If not, why not? – wim Mar 14 '18 at 18:33
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    You are one of the best users of your hammer, from what I've seen, and I like how you lead by example. The lack of meta participation is one thing, but I'm not really convinced that that's a deal breaker. Good luck! – cs95 Mar 14 '18 at 18:46
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    @wim: yes, comments can't be downvoted, this makes quality control harder, they can't be accepted, etc. But I occasionally post answers to non-duplicate on-topic questions in comments, when the answer is so simple, that I don't want to have it on my profile, get rep for it, or spend time to write the explanation. In my experience, such questions often attract horrible answers, and a less horrible solution in a comment is harmless, at least. As for typo questions, they should only be answered in comments. – vaultah Mar 14 '18 at 21:45
  • @wim: I know answering in comments is discouraged, but I can't find information on whether the mods are expected to delete these comments. If not, then as a moderator I would reply to such comments with a reminder that answers should be posted in the Answers section, and move on. Any user can re-post any solution from comments as a proper answer (with attribution). – vaultah Mar 14 '18 at 21:46
65

I'm Yvette, my nomination is here.

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

Currently I do enjoy handling flags on Pets.SE, but there's far fewer flags. There will be days when handling 100 flags feels like a chore and other days when it's more interesting. As I teach my children, when you make a commitment, you may not always enjoy it, the "fun" aspect of any activity waxes and wanes, the point of making a commitment is you do it whether you "feel" like it or not.

The key with any long term endeavour is to pace yourself. Flags are like housework, they'll wait for you, if feeling flagged (pun intended), it's a good idea to take a breather and then return to the keyboard. Personally my style is to pop in and out of the site many times a day.

There is also the facility to take a break and let other moderators know, so if going on vacation or personal workflow is temporarily too high to juggle, it's easy to manage.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

Good content is not deleted, under the terms of service of the site, the content belongs to the network under the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike license. However, users can have post disassociated from their accounts.

I would provide a link to the contact page and instruct them to ask the Community Team to disassociate the question from their account. The network is working on the facility for users to "self-disassociate" posts from their accounts.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I'd reflect upon my moderation style and ask the other moderators, in a private chat, for feedback on where I might be going wrong and how to handle it. In Pets.SE, there's mod who has been moderating for several years and his experience as a mod is valuable and we, the other mods, sometimes ask for his advice. Learning from the more experienced mods is usually the best way to proceed.

As for interactions with the high rep user: I wouldn't reply to any rants, but allow, other moderators to handle anything that may transgress the Be Nice policy, beyond that, I'd ignore it. Constructive posts, I'd usually answer, with my reasoning and apologies for any mistakes I have made. Sometimes the cause of conflict can be miscommunication.

As it persisted, if the other mods were happy with my actions and attitude, I'd start ignoring the posts. There becomes a point, when trying to reach an agreement becomes too difficult, and it's better to walk away and focus on flags.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This question and answer would be my favourite Meta posts How do I write a good tag wiki? Is it okay to use/copy content published elsewhere? and has become a part of the faq. There were a series of posts under the , that I'd participated in and this post became the most constructive.

Nobody gets it right every time, we can only try and practice and learn from our experiences. This post is a good example of some trial and error and finding what was a good fit. My attitude is one of wanting to help and educate, and this post does both.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

I'd be reluctant to go against the community, there's so many varied topics on Stack Overflow and there's many experts in topics I know little about. If I understood the topic very well and could see that the user was trying and, perhaps, being misunderstood, I'd check with the OP that my understanding was correct and make a suitable edit. I have done this on occasion on Stack Overflow, but am always cautious, as there also comes a point where users need to learn how to use the site well and these types of helping hands can sometimes backfire.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

At first I didn't like this question, as it makes the assumption that Stack Overflow is near it's completion, which could take a thesis to answer. Stack Overflow being mature, which is surely is, is an easier question to tackle. The struggle between the "old-timers" and the new user is eternal. So I'm not sure that the situation now is that dissimilar to the early days, in terms of the group dynamics.

The site will change over time, but it's also noteworthy that the site has processes that are observed and that change takes time and the community and the Community Team can prevent change that is not good for the site, and will review changes and reverse those that are not working. My point being, change is gradual, and I'm happy to abide by the community and site's wishes.

Generally, if users are following the Be-Nice-Policy, it's not my place to interfere in the process of change. I'm one voice of many in terms of how the community evolves. As a moderator it would be my job to help the community participate on the site, free of spam, abuses and other issues, rather than make the changes.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

I'd actually expect the user to end up with an automatic question ban. If the user was indeed asking a batch of poorly-researched questions, if they were close worthy, I'd close them and leave a comment under one of the user's posts. I'd likely mark the flag as helpful, as the user is not abusing the flag system and is genuinely frustrated. I'd check with the other moderators if an annotation should be made on the user's account in these types of instances.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

The most important things moderators can do is avoid controversy. Present as a stable person on the site. This can mean taking a back seat in debates if need be and it also means leaving behind social and political ideals or agendas, as we need to remain neutral. The focus is on behaviour and what type of behaviour is unacceptable and to moderate that. So it's important to be perceived as impartial or objective.

Another important asset would be to keep disagreements with other moderators in private chat. Not to have public debates that throw the community into chaos, but to present a calm and cohesive presence, working as a team of moderating the site. This doesn't mean we have to be clones, or have the same opinions, but to try to work out differences behind the scenes, so any disagreements are not blown up in the public eye, as the more people party to a conversation the more likely it will be blown up.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

This post is one of my least favourite meta posts What can we do to resolve debates about gender?. I wouldn't ask for it to be disassociated from my account, as the attempt was valid, but it failed and it is from this I learned a valuable lesson. To keep my own private agendas, political or social ideals out of Stack Overflow (i.e. discussing "women in programming") It's better to lead by example than try to convince people in a site where it's not really the place for the discussion. So the good thing about it is, I'm not going to discuss it again and my answer to that question is my last word on the subject. It's time to move forward.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Delete any comments that are not constructive and leave the user a comment. If it was to continue, discuss it with other moderators as to the preferred way to proceed, a moderator message at first, possibly leading to a suspension if the user was continually making abusive remarks.

These situations are always a bit tricky, because the moment you tell someone to calm down in a heated situation it usually inflames it. At the same time, we cannot change people, but only make the site a workable place for everyone.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Usually not worry too much about these things. It would have to be a topic I was very confident in and really thought the question had value, in which case I'd bring it up in the moderator chat room and have a brief discussion over it. One thing I've learnt, is not to sweat the small stuff. We're all doing our best and there's many grey areas, it's not always clear cut.

  • 4
    All those links look good! Makes it clear you're in touch with what's going on around here. – Josh Caswell Mar 13 '18 at 1:10
  • 3
    @JoshCaswell thanks for noticing! I deliberately chose different types of links to give readers variety and, possibly, a chance to stumble upon things they may not have seen, for instance discussion on SE Meta about the be-nice-policy, instead of a link to the help section. Hopefully it will make it a little more interesting for readers. – Yvette Colomb Mar 13 '18 at 1:15
  • 20
    I actually appreciate that you highlighted a Meta failure. Someone willing to learn from a failure is worth far more than someone who refuses to ever admit that they make them in the first place. – Machavity Mar 14 '18 at 13:16
  • 6
    I applaud the honesty of your worst post and the self reflection that came with it. – Froopy Mar 14 '18 at 15:01
  • 1
    @Machavity thanks, I wish others saw it that way :) – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 '18 at 18:42
  • 1
    @Froopy thanks. I figured that was what the question was asking. – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 '18 at 18:43
  • 23
    It would be handy to know why this is so heavily downvoted – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 '18 at 18:51
  • 19
    Yeah, this and the other negative score answer. Not sure why it's been downvoted to that extreme. Don't let that demotivate you. – Bhargav Rao Mar 15 '18 at 8:40
  • 5
    @BhargavRao thanks so much, I'm still here :D I have a lot of upvotes and you cannot downvote in the election. I actually have the 3rd most upvotes here. Last year was similar and I came 3rd in that election - so still holding out hope. :) – Yvette Colomb Mar 15 '18 at 8:52
  • 4
    Last time it was different (I had downvoted you as well :|), but there was a reason then. I am not finding a valid reason to downvote you this time. Anyway good luck! :) – Bhargav Rao Mar 15 '18 at 8:54
  • 8
    A downvote without an explanation doesn't help anyone, can you please explain your reasons? I think it can be useful. – Umpa Mar 15 '18 at 9:26
  • 3
    The turnaround is impressive. And very confusing :/ – Gimby Mar 19 '18 at 8:37
  • 3
    "To keep my own private agendas", does that mean you still intend to implement a private agenda, just not putting it out publicly? Or am I wrongly interpreting this line? – Adonis Mar 20 '18 at 13:03
  • 3
    @Adonis The whole sentence reads "To keep my own private agendas, political or social ideals out of Stack Overflow." – Sven Mar 20 '18 at 13:37
  • 2
    @YvetteColomb Thank you for the clarification – Adonis Mar 22 '18 at 11:48
60

I'm Samuel Liew, and these are my answers to your questions:

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I do understand that there is an unending stream of flags, and moderating the flag queue would be mostly menial and laborious. However, processing them swiftly and efficiently is a necessary task to keep the site in check. I see moderation as janitorial in nature, bringing balance to the daily running of the site. Fun and pleasure, to me is all about being a part of maintaining that level of order and control.

Regarding survivability - I am already on this site and the SOCVR room a couple of hours almost daily anyway, and should I not be elected, will still continue to help out with closure/deletion/downvotes and use of 10k tools. If the need arises (i.e.: peak periods), I am also prepared to relinquish non-vital commitments in my personal life.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

Nope, such flags will be declined as per standard policy. I would point the user to the licence and also mention they can submit a disassociation request instead.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is mostly situational. If they are due to judgement errors on my part, I will publicly admit and apologize. If the comments/suggestions are constructive and logically sound, I do not see any issue with learning and correcting myself. Also, I will take a step back and seek counsel from existing moderators where necessary.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I do not have any to single out in particular. I will be more active on meta to engage and communicate with the community as part of the responsibilities of a moderator, especially if the posts are related to moderation.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

If a still-opened question can be edited enough to be answered, I'm all in for it! Otherwise standard closure reasons apply. Flagging and closure actions should not be taken based on one's reputation, but individually considered on its own merit.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

I admit that I tend to favour the tried and tested methods (I'm a stickler for rules). However, I am also open to new suggestions and ideas, especially if they will bring a better quality of life to the community at-large (including visitors and new users to the site).

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

In my opinion, the question ban algorithm is already working fairly well in this regard. On top of that, we have the low-quality review queue that allow reviewers to automatically post pro-forma comments to guide users to improve their questions.

I would decline such flags as the user should instead be either downvoting, improving, or voting to close such questions instead of raising custom flags. Decline reason would be: "flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention".

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

A moderator should:

  • work in the interest of the entire community (not favouring a particular user or group of users)
  • stay current on Meta and Meta.SE (not just performing their duties)
  • be able to humbly admit faults (not avoiding them)
  • know when to step-down should one become unable to perform their duties (not sit on the role and deferring additional load to other mods)
  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

Adding on to what isn't already covered in the fourth question: Should one of my posts (including answers) be negatively received on Meta, I would leave it up for the record as I would have already thought through my response (and thus be appropriate for the situation).

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I would treat each flag individually. No user should be granted immunity or special treatment based on their reputation, as it will divide the community. Appropriate action will be taken based on the severity of the situation, including warnings and leading up to a suspension.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I will discuss it separately with the moderator to ascertain the logic behind the action, and if necessary, I will let the moderator take the remedial action on the same post. Displaying conflicting moderation styles/actions does not portray professionalism.

  • 1
    I'm curious, why did you wait to post your nomination? I know there's no rules, and I'm not asking to be argumentative, just curious. Also hi and good luck :D – Yvette Colomb Mar 17 '18 at 9:13
  • 5
    @yvettecolomb Fair question. I didn't see the need to make an early decision, so I took the time to go through the questions and draft/revise my answers and nomination text. All the best to you too! – Samuel Liew Mar 17 '18 at 9:35
  • 2
    I agree it takes some guts to throw yourself in front of everybody. Good luck. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 17 '18 at 12:37
  • 1
    Great set of responses. Good luck. – QHarr Mar 18 '18 at 15:29
  • 1
    Woo, an Aussie! 🇦🇺 But seriously, I really like your perspective and mindset :) Good luck! – Ethan Mar 20 '18 at 8:54
  • I love your response, Good luck tho. I pray you win! – Sunday Okoi Mar 22 '18 at 8:50
  • I liked all your stuffs and voted for you. Good luck. – Jai Mar 26 '18 at 12:39
49
  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

As a gold badge owner for and , I close a lot of questions every day as duplicates, plus the occasional "too broad" and "unclear/no MCVE". I also participate to SOCVR (less than others, but I visit several times a week), plus I favor the "low quality posts" queue (6500+ reviews), and sometimes the "close/reopen" queues. I guess I'll do less of those (leave them to the non-moderators), and more flag handling.

I also carry my laptop in holiday, so there's no service interruption where there's some wifi available. Of course sometimes it's not worth wasting one's time to lock a post as offensive when it clearly wasn't (https://stackoverflow.com/posts/49300358/revisions, 10k+ only), so let's take a break every now and then.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

I don't see how to answer differently from the others or last year candidates. I feel it's a cornercase. However, it's just not possible for us to delete a good question attracting good answers (and we're protected by the license thingy). If possible, try to anonymize the post/dissociate whatever, but not delete. (I never saw that case happening, and what prevents the asker to deface his/her post without anyone noticing? Not so big an issue compared to other challenges awaiting us)

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

When criticized, I tend to take action to try to improve myself. No one is perfect, so I can try to adjust my behaviour if I feel that the criticism is justified. We are human after all, and candidates for moderator positions are by definition less experienced than long-time moderators. Of course, if this doesn't stop, I'm not going to hang myself, so I'll ignore the guy, and we'll see what happens. When you've done everything you could to improve and people are still pushing, that's the only thing you can do.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

TBH I suck at philosophy even if I admire the wisdom of some meta-posters. I'm more at ease on the main site, but I like answering on more technical meta Q&As like:

I'm also interested in serial voting and all possible abuse/system-gaming that can be commited (Abusing tag edits, Show anonymized but complete voting information to moderators).

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

There's sometimes an inconscious downvoting ring appearing on a question that doesn't deserve 10 upvotes, but certainly not 6 downvotes & closures. When I detect injustice like this (I have to know the technical field, of course), I don't need to be a moderator to upvote the question (counter the downvotes) and comment like "come on, the question isn't that bad".

Downvotes are one thing, but if 5 3k+ users decide that the question should be closed, I'm not going to reopen, unless some drastic editing is done (but that can be left to the reopen queue in that case) The fact that close/reopen votes are binding mean that you cannot use as often as when not binding, and I didn't see a lot of examples of moderators single-reopening questions.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

I wouldn't say it's "near its completion". Of course, tags like , , or have their pundits, with gold badges and all, most of the questions have already been asked and answered, and it's difficult for a newcomer (although not impossible) to make oneself a name in those fields.

What's true is that the WT* years are over. You cannot post comic strips and get rep anymore, or answer with a garbage link and get 7 upvotes. That is the maturity Stack Overflow has achieved.

But new technologies or standards are appearing every year, and old-timers won't necessarily follow, leaving room to the "young" generation. Check my fellow python coldspeed colleague. Appeared out of nowhere and majoring in or . Another example: Wiktor Stribiżew the king.

Of course there are others, but considering myself as an old-timer now, I'm not looking into new technologies, having enough on my hand with the old ones.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

When I notice such abuse or copy-paste the same generic trash with a youtube link answer from a user (thanks to SOCVR a lot of times), I already flag & comment on some/all of the posts to warn the user. If I had the mod tools, I would probably delete/lock the answer, and would check with the other mods about more strict sanctions like account suspension or deletion.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

I think of one: As I briefly mentioned above, moderator close votes are binding. When you're not a mod, you can close as "unclear" and see if others decide the same. You just participate. Being a mod, you decide on your own, so sometimes, I think it's better to see if others have the same feeling about a post, and "help" to close the question before too many bad/generic answers accumulate, when there are already 1 or 2 close votes.

Once a question is closed, reopening would mean a failure/mistake from mine, so I'd have to be persuaded with very convincing arguments to reopen. That's why I wouldn't close lightly unless the post is completely unsalvageable with pictures of code, uppercase "help me", etc.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

I have 4 negative scoring questions on meta. I'm not "unproud" of all of them. Some are just suggestions that were made without thinking of all the consequences. Maybe my first meta post, which I wrote when I became annoyed by so many bad questions (Automatic downvoting bad questions). I tried to make it funny and it may have saved me a couple of downvotes, but I clearly wasn't accustomed to the spirit of the site.

Since my post didn't offend anyone, I don't see a reason why they should be dissociated from my account. We are human, humans make mistakes. If a question or answer of mine only collects downvotes, no upvotes and I feel that the tendency isn't going to improve, I'd rather delete it (but for questions only if I don't get replies). That's a right on SO.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I know a guy who produced a lot of good answers, but also a lot of snarky comments, probably because he was appalled by the low quality of the c/c++ questions.

He got suspended for a year (ouch!). I suppose I would warn such a guy, then decide a light suspension with other mods if this continues, then a bigger suspension. High rep or not, you cannot disrespect others here (well, jokes are tempting, but there's a limit)

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Actually, I already had to think about that, a couple of times, when a gold badge user closed a question as a duplicate, whereas it wasn't. I first tried to talk him into reopening, with solid technical arguments.

I could have reopened myself with my gold badge, but I felt it was disrespectful. I never had to reopen the question myself, either we agreed that it was a dupe after all, or he reopened. (of course, if he hadn't responded to my comments, I may have reopened after a while)

So same thing between mods. I'm not engaging into reopen wars with a mod, specially some experienced mod, unless the case is too blatantly unfair and the other mod doesn't reply to my remarks (preferably in a private mod room, a public fight between mods will look really bad), after a reasonable delay.

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    Ooh, you actually decided to apply! Good luck! – cs95 Mar 14 '18 at 2:17
  • yeah, why not? Let's see how it goes. thanks – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 6:08
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    I also carry my laptop in holiday, so there's no service interruption where there's some wifi available.: It's nice that you're passionate but give yourself a break every now and then and enjoy your holidays. This is more important if/when you are a mod, don't burn out. – TheLethalCoder Mar 14 '18 at 9:08
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    I carry my laptop on holiday, but not in the swimming pool. I enjoy some sports at lunch break 2 or 3 times a week as well. And I have my wife and kids to prevent me from doing that too much, that and the piano (that I cannot take with me in holidays, mind). But thanks for caring :) – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 10:06
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    On many occasions I've seen you hammering a post to an inaccurate or even irrelevant target (perhaps using a "close first, edit the target later" strategy). As a moderator, your closure would have more clout - will you continue your "shoot first, ask questions later" strategy, or will you be increasing the time you spend to carefully read the question and any proposed duplicate answers before closing? – wim Mar 14 '18 at 18:00
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    I think your answer provided to point 3. here is dishonest, at best. In my experience, you take downvotes very personally, often get snarky or annoyed about criticism, and can be pretty rude to new members. As a moderator, you will likely be subject to much harsher criticism than being downvoted by me, and will have to deal with clueless newbies a lot more often. Can you convince me you will handle conflict with a level of maturity that has not always been shown in the past? – wim Mar 14 '18 at 18:26
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    When criticized, I tend to take action to try to improve myself <-- I'd like to see evidence regarding the claim. Can you provide a few examples of times occasions where you were criticized, and what actions you took to improve yourself afterwards? – wim Mar 14 '18 at 18:29
  • @wim thanks for bringing the duplicate issues here. Wrong duplicates in many occasions, that's really exagerated. I remember once when I closed as duplicate, then you reopened and answered, so I thought "what the hell" and answered too. Then I got downvoted (shouldn't have answered anyway). I took that to SOCVR where they closed the question as a dupe again then deleted. But I'm not holding a grudge against you and I upvoted several of your posts afterwards (on contents) – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 19:47
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    @wim on another occasion, some high rep user answered a blatant dupe, got upvotes, I closed as duplicate (without downvoting, mind). Case closed? no: the user reopened (with gold badge) just to keep the question to be a dupe. That ended up badly for him when I took it to meta – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 19:49
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    @wim and yes sometimes I close as dupes and it's the wrong dupe. No sooner than today I made a mistake. Others commented, and I reopened because there wasn't any good dupe. But most of the time, it's just a question of changing the dupe target (any gold badge can do it). But today I took a mental note not to perform closure when not concentrated enough. That's for "improving myself". So now that I have you convinced, then vote for me. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 19:51
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    I would like to see something a little more substantial than you having made a mental note, today, about something. Which actions have you taken in the past after a criticism, what was it that needed improvement, and what was the outcome of the action - any improvement? Note: I would like to see more moderators active in the Python tag, like yourself, and will genuinely vote for you if you can convince me you'd be a good mod. – wim Mar 14 '18 at 20:13
  • @wim: thanks for the unexpected support after this gauntlet of criticism. Others were probably starting to believe that you had a problem with me. About the snarky comments, I admitted them in my nomination, but that doesn't happen anymore (except sometimes for the usual "gimme ze codez" clowns). Of course, I never saw a moderator doing this, and I'm not starting this trend, so I'd completely stop, even when it's well deserved. I consider that my hit/miss ratio for finding proper duplicates is very good. Sometimes mistakes are made. I remember fixing a dupe from Martjin Pieters the other day.. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 20:21
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    sorry for all this blurb... as a moderator, I think I'd be even more careful than now, because mods are seen as a whole. If I do something bad now, I look bad. Done as a moderator, it makes all moderators look bad. That's a lot of (positive) pressure. My mistakes are fixable (and are fixed) and I always learn from them. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 14 '18 at 20:25
  • Yes, that's more like it! One more question, if you don't mind. I think it's important for the moderation to be a consistent and coherent force, across the site in general, and also within a tag. I've noticed you don't participate in the Python chat room at all, and have never engaged with other active Python members in the room 6 chat. You seem to prefer just making your own decisions, sans discussion. Why is that? Do you think you will join in the chat if you become a mod, or will you continue to keep out of it? – wim Mar 14 '18 at 20:40
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    Please avoid abbreviations when writing "My As to your Qs", as, for French readers, "Q" means "ass" in French and the declaration sounds like "My ass to your ass". – Cœur Mar 20 '18 at 1:43
27
  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I find something really endearing about cleaning up things. It's why I participate more in community moderation then I spend time asking and answering questions, relatively speaking. It's also why I participate in the charcoal project to flag and handle spam - I just really enjoy keeping a site clean. I've been flagging sometimes hundreds of cases of serial voting a week for several weeks now, as well. The sort of monotony that goes with these tasks doesn't bother me at all.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

First of all, no. By posting here the user has given Stack Exchange a license to publish his post in perpetuity. As our primary goal is to create long lasting valuable Q/A, and as multiple volunteers have spent their expensive and valuable time answering that question, it is not in the communities interest to delete that question.

Regardless, I would point the user to the option of disassociating himself from that post, which can be done by contacting the SE staff directly. But that's about the limit of accomodation.

This would be different if the question was bad or unanswered - the system lets users delete those. But it's not a moderator's job to save users from their own poor choices or to compromise the quality of Q/A to do so.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

Constructive criticism isn't an issue, regardless of volume. I signed up for this when running for moderator in that case, I know that my decisions are subject to community scrutiny at all times.

For non constructive posts, I would recuse myself from moderating those to avoid a conflict of interest - thats what the mod team is for.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

This one would be an example: Action to take when a certain user has a fundamental misunderstanding of the norms on SO

Sometimes tensions rise high, and sometimes you need to take a step back. Dealing with trolls impartially can sometimes be really hard, and I think my advice there was solid. This applies across a variety of disagreements too. Sometimes, when you've gotten in to deep and personal, taking a breather works best. Moderators aren't immune to that either.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

This is a bit tricky. I'm not going to use binding close vote powers or delete vote powers to override a community decision there, but my upvote and downvote and editing powers do not differ from any user's in that case, so I'd probably do what I can to fix the post up. If I do a good job with that, it might not get closed or get reopened later on.

Flags pertaining to the close status of the question are auto resolved in the review process anyways, so I don't need to touch those and can just let community review take its course.

Custom moderator flags are not to indicate quality problems with a post, so those would be declined with the appropriate message.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

I don't see it as clear cut as this. Different users have different expectations, and site policy is not set in stone. To that end, I'm not a radical old timer or change advocate, i'll take policy issues as they come and one by one. As a moderator, I won't be the deciding factor in policy changes anyways. A janitor more like, given to enforce policy rather then necessarily create it.

I know that's a somewhat boring answer but real life isn't really black and white and seeing it as such is unhelpful.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user. What will you do?

Heavily depends. What means consistent in the mind of the flagger? If it's just a couple that happened in a short time, a comment with a pointer to the relevant meta posts might be in order. If it's been going on for longer then that, a mod message mid be. In any case, this shouldn't really happen often, SO has automatic methods of dealing with people who consistently ask bad questions, including automated links to guidance.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

There is a lot here. From then on out, you're not just a user, even in the contexts where you act like a normal user. What you say will be put under harder scrutiny, and when you're wrong it'll be pointed out more. I think the prime thing to learn (and the hardest, probably) will be to without compromise accept your own faults. You can't get away with stubbornly clinging to a position as a moderator. It's already not great as a user, but as a moderator, it's imperative to not do this.

Further, it behooves to minimize apparent bias and conflicts of interest to the public. To the fullest extent possible, a moderator needs to be impartial in their duties. Not just because that's an ethical imperative, but because the entire system of community moderation relies on this being the case.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

First of all, no. I'm not going to disassociate posts from my accounts. My mistakes are public record and there is no shame in correcting them.

Negative reception on meta isn't an attack on me. It might just be a strong disagreement with my expressed opinion or proposition on a topic. Constructive negative feedback is valuable and actionable, and it behooves me to not try to erase my mistakes, but learn to correct and not repeat them.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

Depends on what that user does. Behavior can be adressed independently from their valuable contributions. Having valuable contributions doesn't make them immune from having to follow the rules either. That means, actionable flags will be actioned as normal with that user. If it has to come to a moderator message or even a suspension, it will.

Ideally the user can be reasoned with and convinced to stop that behavior.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

Certainly not by just overriding their decision. I'll use the normal way to discuss closures you disagree with - bringing it to meta. If possible I'd talk to them first too - most disputes can be easily resolved that way.

  • How will your current voting ring focus influence your moderation work? How will you prioritize over your voting ring investigations other flags as spam, chatty comments etc.. the more "boring" moderation jobs? – Tschallacka Mar 13 '18 at 10:45
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    @Tschallacka Thankfully there's a large moderator team to work with, so I assume I'll have time to follow my speciality. But I'm generally interested in handling all kinds of flags and participating in every aspect of moderation. I think I'm qualified to do that. As a side to this, I suspect the total moderator load will decrease if I make it since I won't have to go through custom flags for my serial voting investigations, so the workflow becomes a lot more efficient – Magisch Mar 13 '18 at 10:48
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    Not sure it's really a problem to have mods specializing in dealing with one particular type of problem. – Josh Caswell Mar 14 '18 at 13:01
27

Travis J answers your questions.

Vote for me in the primary

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

Given all of the help I have received from Stack Overflow directly or indirectly either through asking questions or simply finding answers, it is gratifying to give back, and that is how I would view the moderator queue - as an opportunity to give back to the community.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

No, it can be disassociated with their account if it cannot be edited to remove the problematic content. I would only delete it if it warranted deletion on its own aside from the user's specific situation.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

I don't intend to make mistakes at a constant rate. However, if someone has any issues with my moderation approach and they are valid, then I would hope to improve that aspect of my approach in order to do a better job, and would seek advice on how to accomplish that.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

I have been very active on meta Stack Overflow and Meta Stack Exchange in the hopes of helping suggest ways to improve the site either from a community standpoint or a system standpoint. Here are some examples:

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

Salvaging the question isn't really overriding the community, if the edit results in a post which is actually useful and is not just a trivial edit. I don't think anyone downvoting or voting to close would mind if a question was salvaged. If the post is closed but has since been edited in a useful form and there is a good reason to reopen it if a legitimate answer can be made then I would reopen it. However, this type of situation isn't really that common, and is mostly the result of meta posts where the community tends to reopen on their own if the post is properly edited. Most of the time though, it is not possible to edit a question back to a state to be reopened, and the statistics on reopening support that, as unfortunate as not being able to always edit questions into useful ones may be.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

I would just moderate fairly on a case by case basis. As for my outlook, that is pretty established from my 737 posts on meta, and would not change if I were a moderator or not.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

If unaware of the overall situation, I would first investigate the entire claim by looking at all of the questions mentioned. Based on those findings I would either do nothing and let the system handle it since they are on their way to a question ban, or politely ask them if they would like to discuss ways to avoid the ban and improve their style of asking, perhaps by mentoring them through the process of their next question. I was an active participant in the mentorship trial previously, as well as being very used to the chat feature, and would be perfectly comfortable assisting with that. If a single conversation or explanation can save the community time in the long run then I am all for it.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

The formal SO/SE policy, use policy, "code of ethics", and legal statute is a pretty wide net. In my opinion, this is all covered there, and violating any of that is certainly what a moderator should not do. As far as the most important ones, I would say do not violate a user's privacy, do not be disrespectful, and do not shirk the responsibilities of your duty.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

When I was a new user here, I had a great terrible idea and decided to make it a feature request. You can find it here: Automatically remove accepted answer checkmark after two years.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

There is a really big "it depends" here, because the content of the comments is the crux of this issue. For mild situations, just migrating their conversations to chat or deleting the comments would be a good start. For more moderate situations, inviting them to chat and asking them to perhaps tone it down a bit if possible, or to just flag earlier and let the moderation team deal with unconstructive comments would be a decent step; it would also be nice to hear their side of what was causing the repeat issues. For severe situations, I think a small cooldown suspension would be warranted given previous warnings and interventions.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

99% of the time I would trust their decision and move on. If I felt very strongly about it I would ask them politely in chat what their reasoning was so I could better understand the situation.

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    Missed getting out of the primary by, what, a hundred or so! Total bummer. Hope to see you again next time around. – Josh Caswell Mar 24 '18 at 14:11
  • @JoshCaswell Thanks :) I think the remaining candidates will still do very well though! – Travis J Mar 24 '18 at 22:57
18

I'm Brett DeWoody, my nomination is here and these are my answers to your questions. Feedback is highly welcomed, especially if you disagree with my stance on topics.

You'll sense a theme throughout my answers - communication and circumstance.

  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

Flag: Unclear what you're asking

This question is a great example of why I love Stack Overflow and want to be a moderator.

At first glance it seems straightforward. Take a closer look and it's really two questions. Are the two questions related? And focused enough to be valuable to others? Is my definition of 'fun' the same as the OPs, or is 'fun' too subjective? Is my life at risk by taking on this role?

While not all reviews are as interesting as this question, many are. And as a moderator I look forward to diving into posts to resolve and appropriately handle them.

In short, instead of 'handling all these flags every day' I view it resolving challenges every day. And resolving challenges is 'fun' - an activity I look forward to, and can do day after day.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

There's not a blanket rule in these cases, it really comes down to the circumstances.

In most cases like this, deleting won't be the appropriate solution. In rare cases, deletion might be an option. And in some, dissociation might be an option.

In this particular case, the answer would depend on what 'trouble at work or school' means? Depending on what that trouble is, I would follow the appropriate steps as defined in this excellent post.

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

This is a great description of a situation I hope to avoid. And to do that I'd take more significant steps earlier in the series of events to prevent it from reaching this point.

For example, instead of merely correcting early mistakes when brought up, I would ask for feedback on how I could prevent the same mistake from happening again. I would also seek input from other users for additional advice on how to improve.

If the feedback was constructive, and the other user didn't have a history of causing trouble, then should the situation reach the point described, I would take a hard look at my role as a moderator. It's completely possible I'm in the wrong.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

As noted in the comments on my nomination, to date I haven't been too active on Meta. I know this will change should I earn the role of moderator.

That said, I feel the following two questions of mine demonstrate my desire to learn and improve:

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

Like I stated in a previous answer, there's no blanket rule in these general cases. It depends on the circumstances, and specifics of the question and raised flags.

I wouldn't close the question based purely on downvotes and flags. After all, SO has a process for closing questions, and this question is already on it's way. So there's no need to exercise my moderator privileges in this case.

If the question is truly interesting, but needs work, I would probably edit it in this hypothetical situation (because the OP is a low-rep user). If the OP was a mid-rep user I would post a comment and leave it to the OP to improve the question for re-opening.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

(Seems like an analogy for many places and communities in the world at the moment)

Times change and Stack Overflow needs to keep pace. If we don't our beloved site will become irrelevant.

This reminds me of an experience from a few years ago:

I was touring Facebook's office and kept seeing Sun Microsystems logos here and there throughout the building(s). This wasn't totally unexpected, the office was formerly owned by Sun. But the logos were too visible - etched into the glass dividers in meeting rooms, and even on the reverse side of the main Facebook sign. Why? It was an intentional reminder to keep striving for relevancy.

So if I had to choose between 'defend' or 'journey' - you can probably guess which I'd choose:

JOURNEY

...but with direction - in the form of education and setting great examples, to prepare the next members for the same role I'm striving for now.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Example flag texts). What will you do?

As I've said on the similar questions above, it really depends on the circumstance(s) of the question(s) and flag(s).

Assuming the member continues to ask questions, and the SO community is appropriately downvoting the questions, I would come to the conclusion the Stack Overflow paradigm doesn't connect with this user.

And that's ok. We all learn differently, some more than others.

As this user seems to be taking up significant review cycles, I'd go straight to my moderator message privilege and send a message explaining why their questions are being downvoted/closed. The message would be constructive, yet firm, and give specific examples on the member's previous questions and how they could be improved, and/or provide alternatives to finding their solutions other than posting new questions.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

There has indeed been a lot said and asked about what it means to be a moderator and what they're expected to do. That makes it hard to know the most important unwritten behavior rules. But here goes:

  • Value people over the process - without people there is no SO
  • Don't abuse the privilege
  • Highlight the good

This would be interesting to revisit this after serving as a moderator for awhile.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

As said in #4, I haven't been too active on Meta to date.

But honestly, no. I'm proud of all my Meta posts because I believe the community has benefited from them.

However, there's one post I'm a bit embarrassed by due to a glaring mistake on my behalf:

And then there's this down-voted question:

While it was down-voted, the question is still valuable to future searchers to let them know it's not possible to use HTML Entities in Job Posting titles.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

I've worked with 2 or 3 similar personalities in the past, unfortunately, and am always reminded of the book "The No A$$hole Rule".

The premise of the book is this - there are some personalities who's behavior worsens morale and productivity, but who are also high-performing, contributing team members. Ultimately the team is better off without them.

Again, it would depend on the exact circumstances. For example, why are the comments leading to arguments/flags? And have steps been taken to address the behavior previously?

If no steps have been taken previously, I would contact the member to thank them for their contributions, but also point out the high rate of flags and recommend ways to avoid them.

If the member has previously been spoken to, I would ask for input from other mods and consider suspending the user.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

I know I sound like a broken record, but again the answer is (most likely) communication.

First, I would evaluate how I'd handle the question on my own. Then take one of the two following actions:

  • If I'm on the fence regarding whether it should be closed/deleted/etc, I would trust the judgement of the other mod.

  • If I thought the question was truly valuable, or believed the other mod deleted/closed/etc the question in error, then I would start a chat with the other mod to get their perspective and understand the reasons behind their action.

Through communication we should be able to come to an agreement, or ask for additional input if needed.

  • 2
    You are the only up-voting candidate. My vote you got. – Bookeater Mar 23 '18 at 22:09
  • you sounds like a democratic dictator.. – aswzen Mar 26 '18 at 7:38
  • @aswzen - can you please explain? – Brett DeWoody Mar 26 '18 at 8:34
  • Awesome to see you here. I support you. Good luck – Jai Mar 26 '18 at 12:40
  • Thanks, Jai! I really appreciate the encouragement. – Brett DeWoody Mar 26 '18 at 12:50
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  1. Stack Overflow seems to be burning moderators; the moderator review queue is huge; you handle 100 flags, but when you are done there are already 200 new flags. Why do you think it will be fun to handle all these flags every day? What will make you survive more than a few months?

I don’t think this has todo anything with fun. But it is a necessary evil in order to keep the community on our current quality standards.

I also don’t think it will be always possible to handle 100 flags per day, since many of them can be very time consuming.

But yes, this seems to be one reason, why we have another election with 3 possible candidates.

  1. A question is asked and receives some very good answers. The asker then flags this question and asks for it to be deleted because having it up will cause them trouble at work or school. Do you delete the question?

Kind of. I would disassociate the question from the owner. If necessary I anonymize critical content of the post. But I delete a question only*, if nobody has already contributed something usefull to it.

Our content is licensed to the public domain via cc by-sa 3.0

* at least for the given reason

  1. A user has been criticizing your moderation decisions on Meta. This has been occurring frequently over the course of a couple weeks. Some of these posts are very constructively made, with examples and reasoning, while some are more rants. While any mistakes you've made that have come to light were corrected when brought up, it seems that almost every day the user is finding something you've done to draw attention to. The user is a high rep user and generally does not cause trouble, but does seem to have an issue with your moderation style. How do you handle this situation?

To err is human. Having said that, I appreciate the feedback. If the critique is valid, I will take it and admit my fault. Of course, I am learning from my mistakes.

However if a User has a specific problem with me or my moderation style, I will ask other moderators, if it is founded and change it.

  1. Do you have any Meta posts that you're particularly proud of, or that you feel best demonstrate your moderation style?

In the past I was relative passive on Meta, though I accomplished 80 posts there. I was more active in the -tag.

I am not especially proud of this question and answer pair but it demonstrates, I align my self with the community consensus. As a moderator, I wouldn’t write the disclaimer.

  1. As a moderator, you see something useful or interesting in a question by a low-reputation user, however there are a lot of downvotes and couple of flags on this question. Will you trust your gut and edit the question or otherwise override the community, or close it based on the opinion of these other reputable users?

If I have domain knowledge on the topic, I will trust my gut. Otherwise I will trust the community, if it is plausible.

But this needs evaluation of all comments. If I have absolutely no idea, I would just skip it.

  1. As we all know, Stack Overflow is near its completion (mature) (over its top if you like, or even has its way of doing things). The old-timers have their reputation, moderation tools and the occasional brawl on Meta. It is time for the next generation to take the wheel. How will you moderate the new flood of users and their content, given that most of them have different expectations from the current inhabitants? Are you going to defend what we currently have or are you going on a journey to shape the community to make them ready for the next 6 to 8 years? Please take a stand and elaborate.

As I said in the previous question collection, this was one of my favorite questions. I wouldn’t call my self an old-timer, but also not a newbie.

As you can read in my nomination, the thing which makes Stack Overflow so great is good moderation. It is the community and moderation I want to contribute to. It is hard for newbies, but it is fair.

Changing our quality standard for new users doesn't make sense. I will defend our quality at all costs.

  1. A user who consistently asks poorly-researched questions gets flagged by another user (Examples of flagged texts). What will you do?

I need to dig into the situation more on a case by case basis. If the point is valid, I would warn the user the first time (Not sure about the exact tools here).

If the user regularly posts poor questions I think a time ban is justified. It is hard, but it keeps our community helpful.

Still I thought we have an automated system for these cases. But I do not have any knowledge about internal moderation.

  1. A lot has been said and asked about what a moderator is and what a moderator does. What do moderators not do? That is, other than "violate the rules" (which is already a given), what are the most important behaviors that a moderator should avoid engaging in or should make a valiant effort to minimize? Another way to phrase this is to ask: What are the most important unwritten behavior rules for mods that are not found in any SO/SE policy, AUP, code of ethics, or legal statute?

Seriously, this is one of the hardest questions. It is hard to think about obvious things.

The biggest one I thought of is the task to moderate what the community consensus / meta is expecting from you. Even if you disagree.

To reverse the question, I will still ask for help, if I am unsure how to handle a task. And I will still use Stack Overflow as a normal user. So that are the ones I do not stop to do.

  1. Negative of number 4 - Are there any meta posts which you are not proud of? In other words, if you ever ask a meta post, and it receives a lot of negative feedback, what would you do? (Would you ask for it to be dissociated from your account?)

In my early days as being a member of the community, I have asked a silly question, about markdown rendering.

Retrospectively I am embarrassed about it. But it prevents somebody from asking the same awful question. That is the question I have asked, that was my mistake. I don't see any reason for a dissociation.

  1. How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments?

It depends on the kind of flag. I see the comments independently from other user actions.

  1. How would you handle a situation where another mod closed/deleted/etc a question that you feel shouldn't have been?

If my feeling is strong, I would ask the other moderator about his motivation. Maybe he has made a mistake or my feeling is wrong. Depending on the result of this communication, I will handle the situation.

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