57

Here https://stackoverflow.com/q/11246/1339987

Looks like it dates to 2008... was last touched around 2012?

Given that Javascript has changed since 2008, I suggest burninating it, since IMO it does more harm than good by now. It's locked so I can't flag or vote.

  • 1
    I don't see why not. Maybe someone else will chime in. – George Stocker May 24 '16 at 21:30
  • 21
    Ha. Top two answers are broken links. Time to die. – Shog9 May 24 '16 at 21:32
  • 41
    w3schools wasn't mentioned enough in the answers – user400654 May 24 '16 at 21:32
  • @Shog9 fwiw, once I dug around, I found that more of the links were alive and pointing to maintained resources than I expected. This did surprise me. – djechlin May 24 '16 at 21:33
  • 5
    Move 'em to the wiki if they're not already there. – Shog9 May 24 '16 at 21:34
  • 1
    "While some of the material might be elementary for you, Jeremy Keith's DOM Scripting is a fantastic Javascript book. Jeremy also wrote Bulletproof Ajax. While I've not read that one, I've heard good things, and I suspect that those good things are correct, given DOM Scripting." +8 votes. – djechlin May 24 '16 at 21:34
  • 26
    -1 Not enough jQuery. – Heretic Monkey May 24 '16 at 21:38
  • 2
    I don't really like the idea of removing these types of posts in general. However, this removal wouldn't bother me. It is unlikely to help anyone any more than googling the title would in my opinion. – Travis J May 24 '16 at 21:45
  • @Shog9 - It would be nice if the wikis were exposed to google searches somehow. – Travis J May 24 '16 at 21:47
  • 4
    They are exposed to Google searches, @TravisJ. They are not, sadly, exposed to internal searches. – Shog9 May 24 '16 at 21:49
  • 4
    I didn't say it ranked well, @Travis. Try, "javascript tag wiki" – Shog9 May 24 '16 at 21:54
  • 8
    You are correct. Hm. That is unfortunate. Is making the tag wikis have more exposure considered a low/no priority? – Travis J May 24 '16 at 21:56
  • 1
    The C++ books question is an exceptional example of how such a question should be maintained. It is, however, unfortunately an exception. – Jörg W Mittag May 24 '16 at 23:15
  • 4
    @TravisJ I've been on SO for almost 5 years and this is the first I've learned that a) tags have their own description pages, and b) that there is tag wiki content covering a wide variety of 'off topic' or 'too broad' subjects. Wish I'd know about this earlier, looks very useful - maybe I'm just slow but I think more exposure for tag wikis would be useful. \Pperhaps there could something on this as part of the 'Help Tour' or something. – brichins May 25 '16 at 18:08
  • 1
    @brichins - I fully agree! – Travis J May 25 '16 at 18:27
29

Sometimes the best way to see what the effect of an action is to take it.

I've deleted it.

It was locked during a time when we locked questions with historical locks (for good reason at the time); but in this particular case since none of the information could be updated, it never was; and so anything resembling usefulness has passed.

If this bothers you, then you should probably also answer the question as to why no one has brought this question up before now.

  • 13
    It's worth noting that the question was essentially a poor duplicate of information that should have been in the javascript tag wiki. – zzzzBov May 25 '16 at 14:23
11

The reason for deleting it should be "Because this very useful information is maintained and kept up to date in the tag description."

In my opinion, SO tag descriptions are a much under-rated feature of the site. Whenever I come across a new buzzword, the SO tag description is always the first place I go to find out what it REALLY does, as opposed to the official description of a "rich framework" or some other meaningless blather.

SO tag descriptions have helped me find tutorial resources many times.

And in the case of javascript, the tag description includes a list of recommended places to learn javascript, so the question is not needed.

-9

shame this was deleted.... ik this might sound weird to the older developers who knew javascript way back, but it would have been interesting (to me) to compare it then and now lol.... oh well

  • 3
    try web.archive.org? – djechlin May 26 '16 at 14:57
  • interesting, never heard of this site b4 – Jamie McAllister May 26 '16 at 15:05
  • I think the potential harm outweighs the potential good. While comparing how things are changing might be a useful exercise for experienced developers, new developers could run across this and use outdated resources for developing new code. Since the entire question was geared toward inexperienced developers, the latter outcome seems much more likely. – jpmc26 May 26 '16 at 21:19
  • Saving for posterity: web.archive.org/web/20140902024520/http://yuiblog.com/crockford – Stumbler Jun 15 '16 at 9:35

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