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I ran across this C# question as part of a discussion in SOCVR about this question that was originally marked as a duplicate.

The question does not seem to be off-topic, which means a historical lock seems inappropriate. Per the timeline, a former moderator closed it (with the outdated "not constructive" reason) and another former mod reopened it and then locked it.

  1. Is this question actually off-topic?
  2. If not, why can we not just duplicate flag one?
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    Going by "I wondered what people's opinions were on the appropriate uses of type inference via var?" I would gather that right now it would attract opinion based close votes. It may not be off topic (it's about a feature of a language), but it wouldn't be a questions that should be asked on SO. – Braiam Jun 11 at 16:22
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    Is there anything more to say about the topic that isn't covered in the 86 answers the question already has? I've voted to close the unlocked one as a duplicate of the locked one. – Heretic Monkey Jun 11 at 16:25
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    @HereticMonkey considering the the later question doesn't ask for opinions "What does “var” mean in C#?" rather than "opinions were on the appropriate uses of type inference via var" I would say that one isn't a duplicate of the other. – Braiam Jun 11 at 16:30
  • @Braiam That's certainly a valid opinion to hold. Feel free to not vote to close as duplicates. – Heretic Monkey Jun 11 at 16:32
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    From what I can see from the timeline on the locked post (including deleted comments, etc...) it does appear this post was somewhat controversial even in May 2010 regarding its suitability for the site and was thrashed out in comments... it appears no-one (from my reading of comments) could really agree, and so it kept going. Then something in Feb 2013 drew attention to it and that debate started again as well as with it reaching 6 delete votes at one point... – Jon Clements Jun 11 at 16:55
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    ... it's that point a user flagged to point out it was heavily linked to and viewed. I'd guess the mod thought about that and decided giving the goings on with the other disagreements in comments (the history of the post - plus the building number of delete votes), that it was indeed off-topic but nothing would be gained by letting it get deleted, so hence a historic lock. – Jon Clements Jun 11 at 16:56
  • @JonClements Thanks for looking into it – Machavity Jun 11 at 18:25
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To me, this question seems primarily opinion based.

It contains a lot of information, but the question, in essence, seems to just be this phrase:

I wondered what people's opinions were on the appropriate uses of type inference via var?

Also, answers seem to indicate personal preference on code clarity, with disagreement in the comments, indicating the question is actually opinion-based. And it has attracted a lot of meh/bad answers, many of which are deleted.

I think the current status for the question (historical lock) is just fine. It's a useful elaboration and list of opinions on var, but not an acceptable question for Stack Overflow.

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  • This is exactly what I wanted to say. You could remove everything else from the question apart from that sentence, which means the question should have been closed as POB and deleted. Because there's a value in the answers it got historical lock. – Dharman Jun 11 at 16:28
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    @Dharman why not move those answers to a more deserving question? – Braiam Jun 11 at 16:29
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    @braiam Feel free to do so. Bear in mind that most answers are only opinions, so they would not fit to any on-topic question anymore. – Dharman Jun 11 at 16:31
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    Perhaps just edit the question to remove the phrase seeming to solicit opinions? – Cody Gray Jun 11 at 20:51
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    @CodyGray That doesn't change that the question asks for opinions, and most answers provide opinions. I think it's fine as-is, there are other questions describing what var is without that issue, and the code style one is a relevant discussion, it just doesn't fit SO which required the lock, no need to ruin it. – Erik A Jun 11 at 20:53

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