102

Recently I saw a question by a new user, where they showed the error message they were getting in the form of a screenshot of their IDE. I added a comment, telling them that they should include the error message as text instead.

They replied that they didn't know they shouldn't use images.

They didn't have the informed badge, so they didn't even take the tour. I read the tour page again, and it doesn't mention anything about images. So even if they did take the tour, they still wouldn't know.

Granted, it's shown prominently on the How to ask page, but the tour doesn't tell them to go read that page, it doesn't even mention that it exists (I searched the HTML of the tour page for how-to-ask).

I don't know if new users get a different "Ask a question" page than I do, so I can't check if they are getting a hint about how to use or not use images there. I don't see one when asking a question.

Is there any mechanism in place that is supposed to educate new users about this topic, or is the only option that more experienced users do this in comments?

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  • 43
    There should be a warning on the modal that is used to upload images for users with <= 15 reputation. I can't verify if that's still the case though. I somewhat like Tanner's more drastic suggestion.
    – Ivar
    Jan 15 at 10:35
  • 2
  • 7
    When asking questions users are encouraged to "When appropriate, share the minimum amount of code others need to reproduce your problem (also called a minimum, reproducible example)", with a link to the definition of what an MCVE is, including "DO NOT use images of code." (emphasis not my own). IIRC new users also have a slightly different asking experience for their first couple questions, which may tell them. I'd also consider it blatantly obvious that you shouldn't use images of code. Jan 15 at 13:16
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    I still wouldn't blame the site for this issue, instead I continue to blame the user who thinks they don't need to bother to check how the site works and how their question(s) should look like. A bit like a "you tell me when I'm wrong, so I don't need to make sure that I'm right" mentality. And instead of asking who told the user not to post images of code, I would ask myself how would someone even come up with the idea to actually do that? Where are pictures of code preferred instead of the actual text?
    – Tom
    Jan 15 at 13:17
  • 29
    I won't lie, common sense should dictate that an image of text that you want someone else to read, digest, copy, paste, and correct is not a good idea...
    – Larnu
    Jan 15 at 15:45
  • 4
    Could the site do like a basic OCR of an uploaded image and tell the user to post text instead of the image if the OCR finds many characters? I.e. if an image is "mostly text" then tell the user "please consider posting this as text"?
    – SebDieBln
    Jan 15 at 16:32
  • 31
    I'm not asking why images should not be used, I'm asking how and where new users should learn this.
    – mkrieger1
    Jan 15 at 22:44
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    I'm somewhat stumped by the premise that users should be educated on this in the first place. The primary input form is for text and text formatting; most of the content presented to users is text. Would means of "educating" for such a basic matter actually improve question quality, or just give a false sense of handholding? Jan 16 at 9:37
  • 8
    I think experienced users overestimate how obvious "post text as text" is. If it were really obvious, new users would already do it as their first instinct. There are many reasons inexperienced users would post images of text. For one, someone with decades of experience with natural language and two weeks of experience with computer languages won't realize how crucial it is to be able to exactly reproduce failing code, down to every detail of spelling and punctuation. Jan 16 at 11:04
  • 5
    For another, images preserve many details of color and formatting. The details a screenshot preserves may (usually) not actually be important, but for a new user, it's nowhere near obvious that those tiny details are unimportant when so many other tiny details are utterly crucial. Jan 16 at 11:07
  • 4
    @user2357112supportsMonica Correct. Users that know to post code as text are in the extreme minority (even among experienced devs) from my experience. I can count the exceptions on one hand. At work (over the course of several jobs) I always got screenshots of errors, code, etc. I think it may literally only be people who participate in sites like SO that know to provide code as text in any form (let alone with proper formatting). I am pretty sure I learned that only from participating here, I then apply it to every other form of communication (email, IM, forums, etc.).
    – jrh
    Jan 16 at 19:57
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    ("Obvious" links to documentation don't make the linked-to information obvious, and the links themselves may not be psychologically obvious, in much the same way as banner ads get mentally filtered.) Jan 16 at 22:19
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    Perhaps the tour could contain a list of common mistakes so that people could at least be aware that it is a mistake. The learning part remains their own responsibility, there is only so much that can be crammed into the tour before it becomes TL;DR.
    – Gimby
    Jan 17 at 14:33
  • 3
    I sampled the 20 newest questions (out of 22,124,504 questions) today at about 2022-01-17T133000Z+0. It wasn't that bad. 3 out of the 20 had images. 2 out of 3 seemed justified (perhaps one borderline with red squiggles from an IDE). One question had (SQL) code as an image (external link to PNG - by a 1-reputation points user). 95% of users know how to do it properly. Though a minimum sample size of 50 or 100 would probably be more appropriate. Jan 17 at 14:53
  • 1
    @mkrieger1 Reminds me of meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/415040/…
    – VonC
    Jan 17 at 15:31

7 Answers 7

29

This is document in the help center where How do I ask a good question? says:

  • DO NOT post images of code, data, error messages, etc. - copy or type the text into the question. Please reserve the use of images for diagrams or demonstrating rendering bugs, things that are impossible to describe accurately via text. For more information please see the Meta FAQ entry Why not upload images of code/errors when asking a question?

Most users don't read the help documents or meta questions before they post. The best thing you can do is use a kind and constructive comment asking them to fix the problem. I currently use the following (intentionally formatted as code so that it can be copied and pasted).

For questions

Please [edit] to paste the text used in the image into your question so that it can be read on all devices, quoted, edited, and found through search. As it stands now, [your image makes it hard to answer your question or for people with related issues to find your question](//meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/285551/why-not-upload-images-of-code-errors-when-asking-a-question). See the [formatting documentation](/editing-help) for tips to make your text appear nicely without resorting to images.

For answers

Please [edit] to paste the text used in the image into your answer so that it can be read on all devices, edited, copied as text, and found through search. As it stands now, your image makes it hard to view and use your answer. See the [formatting documentation](/editing-help) for tips to make your text appear nicely without resorting to images.

Relevant self-promotion: I created a user script to insert pre-written comments. It comes with these two and many others.

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  • I like this canned comment(s), especially that it starts with the call to action, so it is not easily overlooked. However, do you know of a single instance where a user actually acted on it? Jan 16 at 11:35
  • 2
    @peter. Yes, there have been several instances where this comment has been effective. It would be interesting to go through the places I've used it and get some stats, but I haven't done the work to compile that. It might be hard to do, because I delete the comment if I see that the problem has been corrected. I use it both here and on Webmasters where I'm a moderator. Jan 16 at 11:40
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    I would actually say "copy and paste" instead of "type". I don't know how many times I've seen MREs not actually match up with posted errors, or irrelevant typos in the posted code, or the OP admits that it's not the real code that they're running, etc. Copying and pasting also preserves possible Unicode issues, tabs mixed with spaces, and other issues like that.
    – MattDMo
    Jan 16 at 18:09
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    Re "I'd like to see it linked from the help center", it looks like this has already been done (very recently?). See How do I ask a good question?: "...For more information please see the Meta FAQ entry Why not upload images of code/errors when asking a question?" Can't say that I like that approach. The Help Documentation should, and already did, concisely summarize the situation. I suspect linking to meta is going to be confusing rather than clarifying for most new users.
    – skomisa
    Jan 18 at 0:27
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    @MattDMo I updated with pasting rather than typing. How do these comments look to you now? Jan 18 at 16:34
  • @skomisa Good find, I overlooked that. I updated my answer with the snippet from the help center. Jan 18 at 16:35
  • Looks good. I don't have a separate comment for answers, but I also can't remember the last time I came across an answer with an image of code.
    – MattDMo
    Jan 18 at 16:40
48

Everything you said is true, but it's actually worse than that: some of the features intended to improve question quality are actually causing users to post images of code.

I've had at least one user object that they can't paste the code into the question because the system tells them it's too much code. So they post it as screenshots or links instead, because the system doesn't stop them from posting those.

Perhaps the system should more prominently suggest, on the Ask page, that images should not be used for text.

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    But, if the system is telling them it's too much code, then they either need to tone down the size of their example or add a larger explanation. And "larger explanation" does not mean something like "this is text so i can post ignore it this is text so i can post ignore it", something I see sometimes. We just need more links everywhere to the How to Ask page. I kind of get tired of telling everyone to "see the help center" myself; it would be nice if the system did it. So, we should also make the Ask page itself more prominent. I think part of the problem is that new users don't even read it. Jan 15 at 14:03
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    I'm not blaming the site, but the users who don't take the time to learn how to ask before asking. I'm just suggesting that we try to get users to notice the Help Center. After all, it is there for a reason. Jan 15 at 14:05
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    In general, I have only ever seen users do one of four things, when the system tells them there is too much code: 1) remove the formatting from the code, making it unreadable, 2) post an image or link instead, 3) remove the code completely and then get angry when told that debugging without code is impossible, 4) add random gibberish text. Not once has someone thought to reduce the size of the code or add explanatory text. Jan 15 at 16:04
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    @SylvesterKruin: Any question text that's mostly or entirely filler to work around the text to code ratio restrictions gets an immediate downvote from me. Then I'll skim the question to see if there's an interesting kernel of a real question in there that's worth polishing or encouraging the querent to do something. I figure if people are intentionally defeating the system with useless filler text instead of useful relevant descriptions of what the code is supposed to be doing or how it's designed, that's pretty much a sign of bad faith or unwillingness to carry their share of the load. Jan 16 at 1:31
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    Or just enforce "Informed" badge before asking a question - I know there will be arguments that it won't be effective, but I'd argue that it won't be ineffective, either.
    – iBug
    Jan 16 at 6:29
  • @JörgWMittag how about the message instead of saying "there's too much code" it tells users "can you make the code less verbose" (or something)
    – Braiam
    Jan 16 at 15:19
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    @JörgWMittag I imagine there's some significant sampling bias here because you would never notice the ones that did think to reduce the size of the code - they just look like someone with a normal question. Essentially you've said "when I think of all the users that observably did X, it turns out a lot of them did X" :)
    – Kemp
    Jan 17 at 9:50
  • There may be something to this. Here is an example from today. (Will probably be automatically deleted within 30 days or so.) Jan 20 at 13:30
40

For the sake of science, I just created a new account (lucky I have a work mail ;)). When asking a new question the modal shown is:

Asking a good question
You’re ready to ask your first programming-related question and the community is here to help! To get you the best answers, we’ve provided some guidance: Before you post, search the site to make sure your question hasn’t been answered. 1. Summarize the problem 2. Describe what you’ve tried 3. When appropriate, show some code

Which only says "When appropriate, show some code", but doesn't say anything about it not being in images.

Then, when trying to post an image of code, you'll get:

Images are useful in a post, but make sure the post is still clear without them. If you post images of code or error messages, copy and paste or type the actual code or message into the post directly.

Which is nice and all, but nothing really stopped me from actually posting the image... Not only that, but it even says "If you post images of code or error messages,..." as if it is OK to do so... What's even worse, because of the low rep, the system doesn't allow to post inline images so it posts it just as a link. So now not only we have a useless image of code, it is not even visible on the page...


And now to also advocate the devil just a bit - the system does refer to other pages explaining this in more detail. Regardless of rep, the right sidebar (with some options expanded) is:

enter image description here

And both links for "minimal reproducible example" and "how to ask a good question" have some form of:

DO NOT post images of code, data, error messages, etc. - copy or type the text into the question.

But it would probably be a good idea if the respective bullets would also link to the canonical Why not upload images of code/errors when asking a question? (or even better, have that link right in the yellow warning above, given when trying to post an image).

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    I just received the welcome email to my new account, and I have to say I find it extremely funny that the title of that message is "Your friendly, fear-free guide to getting started" (emphasis mine) as if the company is admitting to the community's "unfriendly-scary-unwelcoming" reputation that it got...
    – Tomerikoo
    Jan 16 at 16:15
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    The guidance text "if you post images of code" should be clarified indeed, something like "do not post images of code, copy the code as text in your question instead" would already be better. There are many such examples onf unclear guidance on SE, I sometimes wonder if SE staff is just not very good at writing clearly, or if they could do it if they tried but just don't care much, or if they keep such texts deliberately vague to give the appearance of making it easy to post.
    – Marijn
    Jan 16 at 20:00
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    In SE's defense they have actually improved wording in similar cases after community feedback many times, but in a significant number of cases the wording was actually made worse or remained the same for sometimes several years, leading to continuous problems with post quality that could have been avoided.
    – Marijn
    Jan 16 at 20:04
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    "What's even worse, because of the low rep, the system doesn't allow to post inline images so it posts it just as a link. So now not only we have a useless image of code, it is not even visible on the page..." - HOLY SMOKES, this is why I keep seeing all newbs posting links to images instead of actual images? Wow, and I thought they were just being lazy or something. Amazing. Seems like this suggestion system needs some re-design :\ Jan 16 at 20:41
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    Did the welcome email have the words 'DON'T PANIC' in large, friendly letters? Jan 17 at 11:56
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    @Marco Bonelli: It is a spam, etc. fighting feature (now only on high-traffic sites like Stack Overflow and Super User). Jan 17 at 13:15
  • "I find it extremely funny that" you posted images without giving their text content as text. (And that's virtually all their content.) (I know the SO FAQ Why not upload images of code/errors when asking a question? title & body is currently about code/errors, but the answer is clear that "anything else that is represented in textual form" should be given as text & indeed "Images should only be used to illustrate problems that can't be made clear in any other way".)
    – philipxy
    Jan 18 at 2:35
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    @philipxy if for whatever reason you need the actual text, it is right there in the markdown for accessibility. Just press edit and copy whatever you need. Also these images are full of text that is not all relevant. I don't see any reason to "transcribe" them fully into text. I did however the relevant parts I see fit...
    – Tomerikoo
    Jan 18 at 7:04
6

Where are new users supposed to learn that they should show code and error messages as text, not as images?

From their parents as children, also known as common sense.

  • If I have a problem with my car, I don't hand the mechanic a picture of my car and ask them to fix it, with the error description "it's not working".
  • If I have a fever, I don't just send a selfie to the doctor and ask what's wrong.

And so on, you get the idea. The source of their problem is not related to this site or even programming, but a lack of common sense. We can't fix users and no amount of help files provided will do so either.

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    But you might send your car mechanic a picture of your car, asking them what's wrong (in order to fix it yourself), which might be easier (and in some cases sufficient) than bringing the car to the mechanic. So, sending a picture is not totally unreasonable.
    – mkrieger1
    Jan 17 at 11:03
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    @mkrieger1 How do you know which part of the car to send them? I'm sure if I sent a picture of my car to a mechanic asking them to tell me what's wrong with it they would tell me in no uncertain terms to get lost.
    – user692942
    Jan 17 at 11:12
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    @mkrieger1 Lets say that the problem is that the starter engine is dead. You send a picture of your whole car. Not helpful. Or if you realize that it's the starter engine, you send a picture of that, where no visible damage can be seen. Not helpful either. Or even if it is - that won't fix it. After spending a significant amount of inane texting back and forth, taking up the mechanic's time, you realize that you should just have brought them the car to begin with.
    – Lundin
    Jan 17 at 11:18
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    Also unlike SO, professional car mechanics are probably not willing to act as some interactive DIY tutorial.
    – Lundin
    Jan 17 at 11:18
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    Of course, we all agree that images are not really useful, I'm just saying that I can understand if some users are not aware of this at first, and they must learn it somehow.
    – mkrieger1
    Jan 17 at 11:19
  • @mkrieger1 Well how about all those years you go to school and whenever you run into a problem, you either bring your textbook and notes to the teacher or have them to come over to help you. You don't send them a picture of the book and text them... If one doesn't understand why and still somehow made it through school and now consider picking up programming... well, programming might not be for them.
    – Lundin
    Jan 17 at 11:23
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    I don't feel this is a very useful answer; it doesn't actually solve anything. This answer feels like it's saying "we don't have to teach them, they should just know". Well... the problem is clearly that they don't know, so unless we just want to deal with it and keep complaining, we should find a good way to instruct the ones that don't know, otherwise they'll just keep on not knowing.
    – zcoop98
    Jan 17 at 16:48
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    @zcoop98 Bad questions by less-than-brilliant users has been a problem since programming forums were invented and none have been able to solve that during the past 30 years. The only way to solve it is by scripts and/or manual reviews before the question hits the site. No amount of tutorials and help files will do, since these kind of users always take the path of least effort. In particular, the completely and utterly useless "how to ask" page not solve anything, which was what this meta question was about.
    – Lundin
    Jan 18 at 7:10
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    Agreed that this SHOULD be common sense, or rather if you think about it you should come to the conclusion that it is not such a great idea. But we live in the 21st century where people don't have the patience for common sense. There is just so little that can be done to manage it because people also do not have the patience to read. Maybe those people who spend their time harshly bashing Stack Overflow on Youtube should spend the time creating tutorials about common sense.
    – Gimby
    Jan 20 at 10:50
1

I think they are not supposed to learn that – they are supposed to know it already.

"Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers". There is a minimum of understanding one should assume from this. Prominently, that includes that code is a form of text and should be presented as such.

Presenting code as images is one of several indicators that perhaps a question shouldn't be asked in the first place.1 Let's not just carry such questions over the finish line for publishing.


1 If they are asked anyway, link to the [ask] help page. Among explaining the "DO NOT post images" guideline, it also addresses other frequent issues of these kinds of questions.

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    You don't have to know anything at all to be enthusiastic. Jan 16 at 9:53
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    @StephenOstermiller You have to know some basics to be an enthusiast programmer. Jan 16 at 13:35
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    @MisterMiyagi I think you are overestimating the state of affairs these days... Jan 16 at 13:37
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    @OlegValter I prefer to think of it as "being enthusiastic"... Jan 16 at 14:03
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    Same argument would suggest there is no reason for having screenshot tools built into IDEs, but they are in some. This is the instagram age
    – charlietfl
    Jan 16 at 15:10
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    Regardless of what they're supposed to know, they evidently don't know it. So, unless we tell them what they're supposed to know, there's a fair chance, whatever the ideal situation is, that they won't know it. Are we willing to trust that they picked up somewhere that Stack Overflow doesn't like questions with images of code, or are we going to equip them with that knowledge ourselves? The latter way is a bit more reliable. Jan 16 at 15:38
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    @SylvesterKruin Let's be realistic here: If we tell them what they're supposed to know, there a fair chance, whatever the ideal situation is, that they won't know it. Actually, looking at Tomerikoo's Post, reflecting how many image-questions I see actually summarize their problem or show what they have tried – nah. Telling them is not reliable at all. Jan 16 at 17:20
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    Most image-questions I see would still be nuked because people fail to provide an [mre]. Even if we could fix the symptom of code-images by writing it down nicely, it won't fix the actual issue of questions that are asked without proper consideration for what volunteers need to understand the asker's problem. Jan 16 at 17:27
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    You're right, the code-image posts often are the low-quality ones, simply because the users don't care about posting quality questions. And hence, if the users don't care, even if we scream "visit the help center" in their face, they're not going to benefit from it, and we'll be stuck with low-quality questions regardless. So, true, not much reliability there. Those careless users are going to be the ones who see "Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers" and read it as "EZ fix for all code" or "Beneficial Procrastination". Jan 16 at 18:38
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    But not everyone is going to think like you do, and see "Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers" and read it as "Don't post images of code". So, for those people included in "not everyone", telling them gives them a better chance of understanding that we absolutely don't want images of code. Again, I'm not saying this will fix the problem (nothing will), but it increases the likelihood that more users will learn. Jan 16 at 18:38
  • @SylvesterKruin I'm not reading "Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers" as "Don't post images of code". I'm reading it as "Stack Overflow is not for everyone". Are some still going to? Sure. Should we cater specifically to them? Nah. Jan 17 at 11:22
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    "Stack Overflow is for professional and enthusiast programmers": do you seriously expect people who are stuck on a programming problem to think "Hey, I need help and here there are people who can help me, but since I'm neither a professional nor an enthusiast I'll move to another site"? Jan 17 at 13:50
  • @FabiosaysReinstateMonica I expect them to realise the thing they are trying to write is text. That really does not seem outlandish compared to what else is expected of them. Jan 17 at 14:04
-3

I think new users may have troubles with inserting their code as text (as just plainly copy pasted code looks awful) so they may think it's better to include their code as a screenshot so answerers can see all "original" formatting (and IDE syntax highlight) for their code.

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    That's why we have the code-formatting tips on the right of the question-writing page. Jan 17 at 18:56
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    New users don't bother reading, they're on site to post question and they choose better way for them to do so
    – Kos
    Jan 17 at 19:02
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    This is certainly the case. The first time I asked a question here (a while ago; using my old, now-deleted account), I pasted in code but it looked truly awful. I was considering posting an image but then I remembered triple back-ticks like GitHub had. Even more evidence: during my very short tenure here on SO (3 months!) I've seen a great many questions by new users where the code looked plain horrid.
    – richardec
    Jan 17 at 19:10
  • 3
    Besides, taking a screenshot and putting in your post is actually a fair amount of work. I'd guess that copying and pasting some text is quite a bit easier than doing all that work for just an image, so...
    – richardec
    Jan 17 at 19:12
  • @richardec not text, but code which simply doesn't pastes with formatting, plus indentation issues may prevent code from displayed properly; screenshots nowadays are made with one hotkey - fast and obviously convenient for new askers
    – Kos
    Jan 17 at 20:10
  • 1
    If this was such a problem why are well over 90% of new users capable of inserting code as text?
    – charlietfl
    Jan 18 at 1:38
  • @charlietfl uhm, because Markdown is not taught in schools, I guess?
    – Kos
    Jan 18 at 9:27
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    I never had any problems posting code here when I was a new user, and the help provided by the site has significantly improved since then. The problem isn't that the users are new, but that they think that posting a sloppy wall of unformatted code is a good idea. We can't fix users like that.
    – Lundin
    Jan 20 at 10:54
  • @Lundin this should be the answer not comment
    – Kos
    Jan 20 at 11:13
  • 2
    I already posted an answer explaining that no amount of help files can fix users.
    – Lundin
    Jan 20 at 11:54
-5

I would propose that users posting a screenshot of code is useful, as it gives a clear indication that the user is unfit to be on SO as they are lacking the common sense to know that textual data should be represented as, well, text. It's probably futile to try to further extend the "ask question" guidance with an appropriate message, as the offending users already ignored the message that's shown when uploading an image.

In an ideal world, there would just be a close reason "image of code" which triggers an automatic suspension after the question has been closed as such. But SO leadership (kind of a misnomer at this point) would probably rather make us coddle the offending users than enforce any quality control, so meaningful repercussions are a pipe dream. Thus all we can do is downvote and closevote any offending questions. Or if you're feeling especially generous, answer any questions that contain pictures of code with pictures of a solution.

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    The last sentence is actually hilarious.
    – mkrieger1
    Jan 17 at 12:12
  • 7
    @mkrieger1 at this point, it's clear that SO does not want to introduce any more quality control and nobody can stop the ever-increasing influx of users who couldn't care less about quality, thus all we can do is either laugh or rage. I personally choose a bit of both.
    – l4mpi
    Jan 17 at 12:18
  • 6
    An automatic suspension when posting an image of code seems quite excessive to me. Wouldn't it make more sense to just block users from posting images in the first place?
    – cigien
    Jan 17 at 13:28
  • 1
    @cigien I believe that instead of blocking a user from posting an image of code, it would be better to just block the user entirely. Not neccessarily for life, but a nice 3 month timeout might have a chance of getting the user to think before posting. But of course this has no chance of being implemented anyways - if the issue ever gets big enough to get attention from SO management, their reaction will probably be to call us unwelcoming for rejecting images and recommend we all use OCR tools instead...
    – l4mpi
    Jan 17 at 13:40
  • Well, there goes the Piet programming crowd ;) Jan 17 at 14:08
  • 3
    @AndrewMorton technically, that's not textual data so it would not be an issue. Also, if your piet program looks like a mondrian painting, it should be easy to represent it as an svg in a stack snippet ;)
    – l4mpi
    Jan 17 at 14:17
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    I actually think the "joke" about answering with a picture of a solution is a great idea. I mean, what better way to show askers how useless images of code are if not to hand them one for themselves and see how they cope with it. I am sure that such an answer will get a comment from the OP ironically saying "I can't copy-paste the code can you please post it in the answer and not as an image?"
    – Tomerikoo
    Jan 17 at 16:07

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