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I have a question about my Stack Overflow post: How to use RegEx to capture multiple landing pages URLs?

I come to this site to find answers by asking questions. But all I've found so far, is that SO users aren't actually interested in helping or identifying the right help someone needs. My question to SO is, what is the point of letting all users who could potentially supply an answer or direct you to an answer, have the ability to mark your question as a negative outright without having to supply any reasoning, data, and/or facts as to why that might be the case (ie, suppling the burden of proof: https://www.justia.com/trials-litigation/evidentiary-standards-burdens-proof/)?

In short, you are allowing users to not be helpful right out of the gate, with zero accountability. That means, for someone like me who is disabled, all I get is the run-around with no actual solutions provided, while users continue to not be interested in helping or have any accountability whatsoever by not supplying the burden of proof as to exactly why my question was marked negatively as "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful."

If you don't understand my question, then ASK a question first for clarification! There is ZERO benefit to shut down a legitimate question, if users cannot get any actual solutions and/or constructive feedback.

marked as duplicate by Tom, davidism, George, gnat, Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 7 '18 at 15:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Often new members can run into conflict when first asking questions because their needs and site rules don't always match. Realize that it is in your power to change only one of these, your needs, and so the best solution to this dilemma is to learn site rules and culture as well as possible, and then strive to have your needs/questions match this. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 7 '18 at 15:05
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    Are we now litigating every question that comes in? Shouldn't we, y'know, charge inspection and trial fees, then, before allowing questioners to ask? – fbueckert Dec 7 '18 at 15:07
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    It is your responsibility to ensure that your question is a good question. Everyone else is not responsible for fixing your question for you. If you want people to have a responsibility to help you, then hire someone, and they'll be obligated to help you. – Servy Dec 7 '18 at 15:07
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    Also understand that members as a general rule want to be helpful, but we are all volunteers, and the shear volume of questions and new users prevents any way for us to hand-hold or mentor new members. Again, the responsibility for learning the rules and culture are yours and yours alone. Perhaps harsh, but this is the reality. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 7 '18 at 15:12
  • I'm not 100% sure if the question matches as a dupe, but it was the best I could find. – Tom Dec 7 '18 at 15:13
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    I disagree with the premise of this Meta question, but honestly though, out of all the RegEx questions posted on Stack Overflow this one is far from the worst. The question has a clear problem statement and it also includes an attempt. – Stijn Dec 7 '18 at 15:24
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    Just FYI, in SO we vote on contents not user. There's no way for any of the users know your disabilities, and even they know, there won't be any special treatments about the content you posted. So I strongly suggest you to put down your rage or disability card and try to have a civil conversation. After all, there will be a good number of users here happy to help you improve your questions if you decided to calm down and listen. – tweray Dec 7 '18 at 15:25
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    Stack Overflow is similar to a Public Accommodation as described by the ADA in the United States, which say "Public accommodations must comply with basic nondiscrimination requirements that prohibit... unequal treatment." That goes two ways; just as a ramp or elevator must be provided where there are stairs, better things aren't given to either disabled people or people without disabilities, the intent is to be equal. Since Stack Overflow is operable for all who can use a computer, being disabled is completely irrelevant, as the treatment is equal for all. – Davy M Dec 7 '18 at 15:25
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    That is, by definition, asking for special treatment. There is no other reason to state that you have a disability; the implication is pretty clear. – fbueckert Dec 7 '18 at 16:26
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    @B.Foor I'd like to point out that 1) You don't know that anyone here is white. 2) You don't know that anyone here is privileged. 3) You don't know that anyone here is a "bro". 4) You don't know anyone here is not also disabled, potentially in the same ways as you. 5) No one on the internet can possibly know ahead of time that you are disabled, and using a disability on the internet to demand assistance is indeed asking for special treatments. Bringing up your disability at all looks like trying to play to our emotions, though I will assume you were just trying to give background. – Kendra Dec 7 '18 at 16:29
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    Can you explain to me if this meta question is about your question on main or about our quality process. If it is about the former, can you rephrase this meta question to point out what you exactly need help with? After that is made clear we might have to conclude both duplicates and the current answers are obsolete. – rene Dec 7 '18 at 16:39
  • Stack Overflow is operable for all who can use a computer, being disabled is completely irrelevant... @DavyM For the parts that are accessible, sure, but I think OP is saying their disability is why they need help, not that their disability is preventing them from using the site. – BSMP Dec 7 '18 at 19:50
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    @BSMP In a now-deleted comment (probably because it had some colurful speech directed at Servy), the OP specifically said that s/he was not seeking any sort of special treatment. If their disability is why they need help, then they would be seeking a special accomodation for it, so that isn't the reason. And the original question on Stack Overflow also has nothing to do with a disability, it's about Regex, a question anyone could have asked. Thus my point, saying here in the meta post that there exists a disability is completely irrelevant, is based on the information this OP gave us. – Davy M Dec 7 '18 at 21:34
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Let's try taking this in parts:

I come to this site to find answers by asking questions. But all I've found so far, is that SO users aren't actually interested in helping or identifying the right help someone needs.

So do several thousand other users. Every day. There's not nearly enough experts to give each question a decent amount of attention. To cope, most experts will do preliminary triaging to determine how much effort to expend on each question. Those that don't make the cut will usually be downvoted, and they move onto the next one.

My question to SO is, what is the point of letting all users who could potentially supply an answer or direct you to an answer, have the ability to mark your question as a negative outright without having to supply any reasoning, data, and/or facts as to why that might be the case (ie, suppling the burden of proof: https://www.justia.com/trials-litigation/evidentiary-standards-burdens-proof/)?

Because the downvotes are not for you. They're for the next readers, to signal that the post is not worth expending additional effort on. Over time, that can save hours, days, weeks, even months of effort.

You seem to want people to have to justify downvotes, to a legal definition, no less, but are not concerned that your own question does not meet those same standards. If you want people to expend effort, then you need to expend your own.

In short, you are allowing users to not be helpful right out of the gate, with zero accountability.

Oh, they are being helpful. They're not just focused on you, though. They're focused on everybody else that comes after you.

That means, for someone like me who is disabled, all I get is the run-around with no actual solutions provided...

We don't focus on personal circumstances. We focus on content quality. As an example, you could be Groot, and as long as your post isn't just endless, "I am Groot!" messages, we wouldn't have the foggiest you're a sentient tree from the other end of the galaxy. Your post is what matters.

...while users continue to not be interested in helping or have any accountability whatsoever by not supplying the burden of proof as to exactly why my question was marked negatively as "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful."

We don't guarantee help. We've never guaranteed that you'll get help. What we do, though, is try to make sure that content can help many people.

If you don't understand my question, then ASK a question first for clarification!

...Why? I've already explained that the experts are overwhelmed; there's not enough time to give every question the same attention.

There is ZERO benefit to shut down a legitimate question, if users cannot get any actual solutions and/or constructive feedback.

Question legitimacy is a common argument used to justify a question. To be honest, you having a problem doesn't mean you can ask a good question. That's what we want; a good question. You still have to meet our quality standards, even if you currently have a problem.

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Your Stack Overflow question had a couple issues with it, and on a popular tag... That means you had a lot of eyes on a question running afoul of the rules. A quick way indeed to get downvotes, you are right.

What issues did your question have?

Well, for starters, let's look at that downvote tooltip you mentioned:

This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful.

Alright. Your post had a clear problem statement and what your were trying... But showing research effort... Not as much.

You say you did a lot of research, but we have a ton of information on RegEx right here on SO that could have helped you, and you didn't link to any of it and explain why it didn't help or what you didn't understand. Honestly, I'm surprised it wasn't closed as a dupe, there's likely one somewhere on the site. As for useful, honestly, that's really an opinion point. Escaping is definitely a stumbling point for beginners with RegEx, but again... We have a lot of RegEx resources on SO, so I can see someone arguing it's not useful if it's been covered already. I personally am neutral there.

The next issue is mostly just in how you present your problem. You lead your post in with the background of being new to RegEx and having "read 100 of pages, downloaded cheat sheets & guides" and basically complaining about not having found the solution yet. I feel you, dude! When I started RegEx, it felt like a daunting task and a nightmare. But starting out with a mini-rant is just going to get people to tune-out and possible downvote before they get to the meat of your problem. Always start your posts with the problem statement itself, then explain more, and finish by reiterating your problem statement.

Try to keep anything unnecessary out of your post, anything that isn't 100% relevant to solving your issue. Make sure you show what you've tried, so others don't waste time re-treading ground you have (or can show you where you went wrong with one of your attempts) and can help you get your answer faster, and be sure to be clear and straight to the point. Spell it out, even if you think what you're saying is obvious. They can't misunderstand if you shove it in their faces! (Politely and professionally, of course.)

Not everyone has a great first question on SO. In fact, a lot of people don't, because the format is quite different from the forums people are used to. I suggest reading through Meta a bit, especially the section, and maybe visiting the Help Center if you haven't already (or re-visiting if you have, I still do from time to time to brush up) and taking what you find there, and what you learn from this post, to heart.

Good luck, and I hope your future endeavors with the site don't leave such a bitter taste. Welcome to Stack Overflow!

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You seem to be misunderstanding the purpose of Stack Overflow. SO is not a help forum, it's a high quality Q&A website. Help forums is where people do everything they can to help you, asking a question, solve your problem. Stack Overflow's mission is to build a detailed Q&A library of programming-related questions.

We expect users to show research effort and ask a clear question, so that a question is clear, and answerable with an answer. On the same hand, we expect answers to questions to be just as clear, so that anybody who visits the thread can easily find the answer to the question. This is much unlike a help forum, where quite often, there will be a lot of back and forth question asking, narrowing down the problem. This is why Stack Exchange implements a system with downvotes and close votes, to ensure the quality of the Q&A library.

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    Forums also have thread hijacking. The OP asks for one thing, people start talking about totally different things. Also lots of "me too", "did you find an answer?"... and we can't even downvote these posts or vote to delete them. – brasofilo Dec 7 '18 at 19:29

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