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I wonder why people do not use line breaks and periods. I see many long paragraphs and sentences using commas.

Some posts are really hard to follow and require (lots of/some) post-editing to understand them.

  • How can we encourage people to use (shorter) sentences using periods and include line breaks?

I know that this is included somewhere in the guidelines, such as how to ask, etc. but people are not following this simple advice to make their posts more readable.

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    Yes. It's a huge problem, but I'm not sure there's a good answer for "why" that's particularly productive to discuss here. Explaining why writing skills are generally poor is beyond SO's control (differing native English skills/education/cultural expectations for effort when contributing to an online community, people "texting" posts on phones, etc...). So it's not so simple to achieve as you may think. It's probably most pragmatic to insist on content quality. If a post is well-researched, informative and accurate, I can edit a few run-on sentences (but formatting and quality do correlate).
    – ggorlen
    Oct 1 at 1:27
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    As far as encouraging shorter sentences (and other grammar/formatting standards)--that's tough. Voting is good. Docs/guidance is good (but rarely heeded). Machine assistance is questionable and often has unintended side effects. Editing sometimes makes me wonder if I'm just a human autocorrect. Related: Why do so many posts contain poor grammar or poorly worded titles?
    – ggorlen
    Oct 1 at 1:31
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    I really like "It's probably most pragmatic to insist on content quality." - currently, I just edit posts, but I have already told some people that I did and why.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 1:34
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    Standards are not possible, I know. I am not aiming for standards. Writing is pretty tough. "human autocorrect" is fantastic :) We had "human google translate" at work today. I will check out the link you have added. A reminder may be good though.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 1:44
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    There's a different between fixing long sentences/paragraphs and reworking posts. Telling the users help. I remember a situation where I edited/rewrote a complete post and the developer who posted it was really really thankful for my edits, see stackoverflow.com/questions/71534173/… (check the initial and final post, far beyond fixing line breaks and commas though).
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 1:44
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    I forgot to mention, welcome to meta @Christian and thanks for helping the community with your edits! Back to my "it's hopeless" tack: you might want to check out the "Thanks in advanced" saga that's been plaguing the community if you haven't yet. TL;DR just getting people not only to not write "thanks", but even just to spell it correctly is virtually impossible.
    – ggorlen
    Oct 1 at 1:49
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    related: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/109025 (and also read the Linked posts on that question)
    – rene
    Oct 1 at 8:55
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    As much as we would like people to improve, we can't make other people do anything (unless there is sweet, sweet reputation points involved, of course). Most people are not interested in learning anything (there are exceptions, of course). For instance, native speakers don't have any interest in learning to avoid producing run-on sentences or distinguish between than and then. Just be thankful it is possible to change the content on Stack Overflow. Oct 1 at 12:35
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    @PeterMortensen interesting links! Didn't know these run-on sentences. But I need to object against your really general statement in bold though, a lot of people are willing to learn.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 12:56
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    Re "do not use line breaks and periods ... using commas": That is mild. Leaving out punctuation completely (in between sentences in a paragraph) is much much worse. The suffering experienced by readers is much higher. I wouldn't attribute sadistic motives to the writers, but there is a total lack of empathy for their readers. Sample 1 (starting from "so i need to align"). Sample 2. Sample 3 (requires more than 10,000 reputation points). Oct 1 at 13:14
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    Though it should be said there are sometimes internal separating newlines in the Markdown source (that don't render), but that is only the case for sample 6 and sample 7 and partly for one of the other samples. (Many other systems, e.g. some forums and WordPress, render newlines in the source, but Markdown and HTML don't.) Oct 1 at 13:41
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    A big part of the problem (although I'm probably not allowed to say this) is that many of our first-time posters are, for whatever reasons, just about completely incompetent. They are as incapable of paying enough attention to markdown syntax to construct a coherent post as they are of solving (or even understanding our answers to) the programming problem they're trying to ask about. (And, sadly, no amount of encouragement will change that.) Oct 1 at 15:34
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    @PeterMortensen That user with 28k rep from your examples is weird. Can't understand how someone can ask almost eleven hundred questions. In possibly every existing technology currently available.
    – Lino
    Oct 1 at 21:49
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    @Lino: Here is another example (the daily (or higher rate) questions subsided approx. 2015): 1,813 questions. The writing style did improve somewhat over the years, but only after more than 1,000 questions had been posted. "every existing technology currently available" might indicate paid homework, but the writing style contradicts it. Oct 2 at 12:08
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    cont' - More likely is using Stack Overflow as a personal assistant who you can ask any programming question the moment it enters your mind. Another possible motive (but unlikely) is getting a lot of reputation points. A well-known way is asking literally thousands of questions, ignoring the occasional downvotes, and don't ever delete anything. Oct 2 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

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If this makes the post completely unreadable and you can't edit it to make it make sense, then downvoting is the best choice. If it's a question then vote to close.

The problem is as old as time: people type the same way they speak, and in their head it's perfectly understandable, but to others it's not. It's complicated for someone using British English to explain to someone using Indian English, as an example, why their sentence structure isn't quite right.

So instead of getting into that quagmire, just vote their post down and close the questions when appropriate. Then it's the system's responsibility to explain it to them.

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    Thanks for your contribution to this discussion. Nearly there. But who's the system? I feel responsible to explain my intention when applying edits or downvoting their question, which should be the way to go for me and anyone else. If we just close the question due to low quality, no one will learn and benefit from it.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 2:02
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    "If we just close the question due to low quality, no one will learn and benefit from it"--on the other hand, if we close the question due to low quality, no one will suffer from it.
    – ggorlen
    Oct 1 at 2:04
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    Different topic but I felt just bad when my question got closed when I started on SO. I have seen people reposting their questions 3 times... there may be better solutions.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 2:06
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    Turns out to be off-topic but I really don't like additional useless sentences, such as "I have tried for x hours" or "I have searched the entire SO site for answers" :)
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 2:18
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    @Christian: The system is Stack Overflow. The system already explains why editing and downvoting can happen in the Help Center, so you shouldn't have to repeat yourself. Also, I'm of the strong opinion that you don't learn anything from a low quality post.
    – Makoto
    Oct 1 at 2:26
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    So, linking to stackoverflow.com/help/why-vote and stackoverflow.com/help/editing will explain my edits. Thanks for you downvotes/explanations.
    – Christian
    Oct 1 at 2:34
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    If it's really bad I just comment as follows - People are more likely to read your question/answer if you format it so it is not a wall of text. Please read Markdown help and edit your question to add paragraphs and bullet points ... Oct 1 at 3:59
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    @DavidPostill: That doesn't help a ton; it puts the target on your back for the person who thought they were coherent, and it makes you sound kinda pretentious, as if you're less interested in their question and more fixated on their grammar. Both are a nasty cocktail and you want nothing to do with it, trust me.
    – Makoto
    Oct 1 at 6:41
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    @Makoto I've never had any nasty responses on Super User Oct 1 at 6:46
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    @DavidPostill: Super User gets a fraction of the traffic, attention and energy that Stack Overflow does, so it's not a balanced comparison. It has something to do with being toxic because they wrote a question asking about how to learn to code, we closed it, they complained on Twitter, etc, or whatever, I can't remember and CBA to pull up the initiative that put long-time curators on the outs with the company. But I tell you you're comparing apples to galaxies here.
    – Makoto
    Oct 1 at 7:11
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    @Christian: No, you don't have to do that at all. The system already does it.
    – Makoto
    Oct 1 at 7:12
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    "If we just close the question due to low quality, no one will learn and benefit from it." We are not even remotely suffering from a lack of questions. We are suffering from a surplus of nonsense camouflaged as questions, which clutters search results and in many cases makes it harder to find canonicals or even actively pulls searchers away from them. Oct 1 at 19:17

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