5

Sometime I see questions or answers with a ivory/light yellow background blockquote to highlight or cited reference.

What editing syntax can I use to achieve this result?

And what's the official use of this feature?

Is there any related documentation?

  • 1
    use > in front of a sentence – rene Feb 13 '17 at 12:48
  • I read this syntax, but > is only giving grey background blockquote. The one I'm mentioning is more like a short paragraph. I'm not sure if it's even called blockquote. – KDX Feb 13 '17 at 12:50
  • Related documentation is in the Help Center: How do I format my posts in HTML or Markdown? – Aziz Shaikh Feb 13 '17 at 12:52
  • 6
    The styling is different on Meta. On Meta, blockquotes use a gray background. On Stack Overflow, they use a yellow background. – Cody Gray Feb 13 '17 at 12:52
  • 1
    @CodyGray I got it. I've never really tried it on Stack Overflow, was seeing it often and don't know where it comes from. Asking a editing support question here at meta by trying out the > in the form field is giving me gray background, making me wondering how does it work. Searching yellow blockquote and nothing related shows up. Please post it as an answer and I'll accept it. I'm sure many new comers would like to know this too. The formatting help page didn't show a sample of the yellow background, that's why I couldn't figure it out after research. – KDX Feb 13 '17 at 12:57
14

This is a standard blockquote.

The Markdown syntax is to precede the text with a >. You can achieve the same effect in the editor by highlighting the block of text and clicking the quotation-mark icon in the toolbar.

Blockquotes have a light-yellow background on Stack Overflow. On Meta, the styling is different, and they use a light-gray background.

  • 2
    Note that if you like typing a lot, you can also use the HTML <blockquote> and </blockquote> tags in the post. – Mr Lister Feb 13 '17 at 18:48
  • You can, but I don't think you should. Always prefer Markdown formatting over HTML tags when Markdown supports the formatting you want. – Cody Gray Feb 14 '17 at 3:49

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .