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The Problem

Many questions have answers which are of high quality, but which are also extremely long (compared to how short they could be). Some examples (see the accepted answer):

While there's nothing wrong with writing a long and elaborate answer, many readers may be interested in a concise summary of the topic, rather than a 20 paragraph blog post about every little detail. Overly long answers create two major problems:

  1. For readers who want to browse answers to get an overview, long answers towards the top force them to scroll through the entire top answer first, and this can be a huge scroll distance. The result is bad UX.

  2. The longer an answer towards the top is, the fewer people are exposed to the answers below. The result is a more uneven and unfair distribution of upvotes, and lengthening your answer can be used as a malicious tactic to prevent your competition from gaining upvotes!

Could this be solved through sorting modes?

First of all, no. No matter how you sort, the top answer could always be overly long. This only mitigates the issue; it doesn't solve it.

Secondly, sorting modes are somewhat broken at the moment. For example, on the question var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}, at the time of writing, all four sorting modes show the same answer at the top, because it is simulatenously

  • the most upvoted answer
  • the trending answer
  • the most recently updated answer
  • the oldest answer

Proposed Solution

I believe the best way to address this issue is through UI. Add a cut-off point beyond which you have to click to reveal the rest, such as:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat ...


Click to reveal more

It would probably be best to base the cut-off point on the size of the rendered Markdown content.

Clarification: The cut-off point shouldn't be anywhere near as close as in this lorem ipsum example! The point is that if you make your answer a novel, not every reader is forced to scroll past that novel. In the answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/3279550/5740428, the cut-off point should be somewhere around the second major heading An in-depth explanation.

Concise answers (up to a few paragraphs?) would be unaffected, but answers which are practically novels would be limited. If a user was interested in an overly long answer, they could click to see the full content; otherwise, they could scroll past more easily.

To clarify, I am not suggesting to lower the hard length limit.

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  • 6
    What would a good length cutoff be? Based on screen size? Based on line count? Based on the gap a bridge of ants can cover?
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 11:34
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    @Laurel I'm aware it's not a perfect replacement but keyboard shortcuts can do that on desktop. If you enable them, J will go down the post list, K will go up. Doesn't work on mobile, of course, and it's not super intuitive to just pick up, either.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 4, 2023 at 11:44
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    I'm kind of against this - I feel the site already tends to attract way too short answers (Most answers I see in reviews that are actually longer than a couple paragraphs are old audits), and I feel like hiding parts of well researched answers punishes them in a way. I could however get behind up/down functionality on mobile similar to the existing keyboard shortcuts if it could be non-intrusive and not terrible (please don't give us Discourse scroll bars)
    – LW001
    Sep 4, 2023 at 12:14
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    Oof, yea, the possibility to hide spam in a collapsed block has put me off of this suggestion... That's awful.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 13:02
  • 3
    @Cerbrus if someone puts spam into their answer ... just flag it? I don't really understand what danger this poses. And if someone does put spam into their answer, they would be subject to moderation. What exactly does this enable someone to do? Sep 4, 2023 at 13:46
  • 6
    I think this is a great suggestion as I personally find long answers to trail off the problem at hand more often than not. Yes, they provide background knowledge and have you understand the underlying issues, but they can very easily become pointlessly long and tedious to read.
    – Cuzy
    Sep 4, 2023 at 13:52
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    A big advantage of having all answers in full length by default is that one can simply use the browser search for a function name etc. Sep 4, 2023 at 13:53
  • 4
    @JanSchultke the problem is that the spam is "hidden" and requires users to actively look for it, making it much less likely to be flagged & deleted.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 14:28
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    Also, if this feature causes no one to ever look at that spam, I think that's a very good reason not to implement the feature. We don't need to add features to make it easier to spam the site.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 14:49
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    Mate, you made a suggestion for a new feature. Then you're saying it's not a problem that it's going to allow more spam to survive because no one will expand long answers, anyway... Then what's the point of your suggested feature?
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 14:51
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    "you have to click to reveal the rest" -- as opposed to just rolling the scroll wheel with a single finger, and just reading on, I have to hunt down some button? Not sure how that's better -- at least for someone with non-zero attention span, who has no problem reading things.
    – Dan Mašek
    Sep 4, 2023 at 14:53
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    Quora (and other sites) uses it, so it is probably (unfortunately) coming here sooner or later (it is already comments and lately in "Related questions" for questions without answers. Sample.). Our only defense is the usual inertia. It requires mouse clicks (or the equivalent) to use. Very bad. Sep 4, 2023 at 16:10
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    I absolutely hate websites that hide content behind “click for more” functionality. Like so much hatred I actively avoid them Sep 5, 2023 at 11:08
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    @Gimby What if answer has some special section with huge warning. You will not miss that even if you scroll, but you can easily miss it with collapsed answer. and warnings commonly come after full explanation and are not the first thing on top unless it is directly related to the question itself.
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Sep 5, 2023 at 12:12
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    @Gimby If I am looking for solution, then I will read all answers fully. Or at least will quickly browse though them all to see whether there is some hidden gem or piece of information worth knowing. And if we start from the position that this is the issue only when there is plenty of other answers, then I suppose scrolling won't kill you either.
    – Dalija Prasnikar Mod
    Sep 5, 2023 at 12:21

1 Answer 1

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No.

many readers may be interested in a concise summary of the topic

Hiding answer content is not creating a concise summary of anything, it's just adding an extra hoop ("click to expand") to jump through for people who want to read that entire answer.

The result is a more uneven and unfair distribution of upvotes, and lengthening your answer can be used as a malicious tactic to prevent your competition from gaining upvotes!

It could equally be argued that such a feature will unfairly discriminate against users who make the effort to write long and comprehensive answers, because that extra hoop disincentivises people from clicking to read the entire answer. Or to put it another way, it will discincentivise users from writing long answers because they know that most people will never read them.

Stack Overflow is not TikTok. Programming is not tl;dr. Understanding is everything, and long answers provide that understanding. They are arguably the most valuable content on this site, and the potential of neutering them in any way shape or form leaves a poor taste in my mouth.

Buttons to move between answers, as noted by @Laurel in their comment on this question, would have the same desired effect but none of the drawbacks I've noted. I'd be happy for those to be added, but let's leave the presentation of answers as-is, please.

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  • 2
    I think this answer fails to consider the suggested cut-off point. I have said that a very sizable chunk should be visible by default; the cut-off point should come after multiple paragraphs. This is not anywhere near "tl; dr" only; this is not anywhere near turning Stack Overflow into "TikTok". If you have taken the time to read my question in full, then I don't understand how you could have arrived at such a conclusion. Maybe it is my bad. If you haven't, then this answer is pointless and insulting. Sep 4, 2023 at 13:42
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    I appreciate that there are keyboard shortcuts for navigating between answers. That is a useful feature. However, without evidence that a substantial portion of users uses them, or even knows about them, are they really a solution? Obscure features that a selected few know are not a solution to a systemic problem. I would call these shortcuts obscure, because I've used SO for half a decade and just now learned about them. Sep 4, 2023 at 13:44
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    It doesn't matter how sizeable the chunk is or not; obscuring any part of an answer by default is a problem. The keyboard shortcuts should be augmented by buttons.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 4, 2023 at 16:03
  • 2
    Yeah sure, it is a problem to some people. To some other people it is also a problem that massive questions take up a lot of space. Either way, there is some problem. A good answer would quantify these problems, explore trade-offs, and draw a reasonable conclusion. It doesn't help me if you just boldly say "No.", list a few unquantified problems, and then draw a conclusion with no real discussion or trade-offs made. I think the buttons would be a good idea though. It's not like navigation buttons fully solve the problem on their own though, I believe. Sep 4, 2023 at 16:07
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    Look, Jan, I realize you're new to Meta... You might not realize that the burden of proof you're demanding equally applies to your claims. If long text is such a large problem, prove it. Back it up with some data. Provide sources stating it's an issue. If you can't do that, you can't honestly dismiss answers opposing your opinion, for the same reasons.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 4, 2023 at 16:55
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    @Cerbrus if it looks like I'm dismissive of this answer, it's because it looks to me like the author hasn't actually read the full question, not even the disclaimers that I have put in bold text. I also feel insulted by the implication that I want to turn Stack Overflow into "TikTok" or something. An answer should be able to provide more insight into a topic, instead of countering with a hastily written opinion piece that strawmans the author of the question. And quite frankly, I don't need be educated about Meta by someone who follows me on Meta in every comment section just to argue. Sep 5, 2023 at 11:13
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    Jan, I'm very active on Meta. It's not weird that we run into each other. Accusing me of targeted interaction like that in counter-productive. You're dismissing this answer as a "hastily written opinion" and a "strawman" (as you've dismissed a lot of other answers), but this answer is based on years of experience on this site. You completely missed the point of my last comment. I'm asking you to hold your own claims to the same standards that you demand from us. Your suggestion here is based on your opinion. Back that up with data. Prove that it's a problem that needs fixing.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 11:24
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    This: "it looks to me like the author hasn't actually read the full question" is a major red flag, by the way. You're just dismissing Ian's answer, using an approach often used by users with less-than-benign intentions.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 11:27
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    Jan, you're posting suggestions on a public website. Other users are free to (dis)agree, and write about that. You're being very dismissive of any disagreement, and I'm asking you to hold yourself to the same standard as you're expecting from others. I don't want to "be right", if I'm wrong I want to be proven wrong, not just dismissed as "that's just your opinion".
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 11:33
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    My first comment here was just me asking for some extra details... Then I realized this could hide spam, and stated that I thought this was a bad idea... Then you started dismissing my concern with "if they're not gonna see spam, what's the problem", which is a horrible justification to implement a new feature... But you're just dismissing it. Here's a solution: If you don't like my feedback on your feature request, you can just ignore it. You don't get to tell me where I can and can not provide feedback.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 11:41
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    @Cuzy: That first comment was a serious question, with a lighthearted arbitrary measurement. If anything, I was making fun of my own question there... Then I realized hiding spam was a problem, and my further replies to that are just about that specific issue.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 12:54
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    @JanSchultke how is comparing this site to TikTok, to highlight the contrasts and thus bolster my argument, snarky?
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 5, 2023 at 15:19
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    I think Ian's intention was to state "Brevity is not an aspect we value here". Factual correctness, and a complete explanation is more valuable.
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 5, 2023 at 16:23
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    @Cerbrus It's not that we don't value brevity at all, it's simply that like Wikipedia, we value verbosity higher.
    – Ian Kemp
    Sep 5, 2023 at 17:55
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    On the other hand... this feature may encourage answerers to do better about getting to the point earlier on in the answer rather than it taking skimming/reading over 2 pages of content before getting to what we're after.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 5, 2023 at 17:58

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