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I was writing an answer to a question today, and by the time I got to the submit button, the question had already been closed. I usually write my answers up outside of the browser editor, so I probably missed the mark by a minute or two.

I was a bit annoyed that my work was now moot, and I was curious if I could actually still post my answer. As a test I removed the "disable" tag from the HTML button using my browser's editor, and I was able to post the answer. I then promptly deleted the answer because it felt like bad etiquette.

I understand that this is not an unknown behavior, but what is the SO guidelines on users who abuse this workaround? From this meta-question, user @psubsee2003 writes:

The server will accept an answer during the grace period. It used to be several hours, but not sure exactly how long (and if it is still hours long). However, client side, users are prohibited from attempting to post the answer as soon as the client is notified that the question was close.

Do any community rules state that this is not allowed?

Are there any actions taken against users who exploit this workaround?

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  • 13
    "Are there any actions taken against users who exploit this workaround?" - How would you differentiate between users who purposefully did it and users that didn't?
    – Nick
    Sep 13 at 20:31
  • 4
    Trying to think of a better title... maybe "SO Rules on exploiting client side bugs"
    – flakes
    Sep 13 at 20:36
  • 24
    It's not a bug. It's intentional. It's perfectly allowed, but if a question has been closed and you know it's been closed, that's an enormous flag to you that you shouldn't be answering, and that you probably shouldn't answer. So allowed? Yes. Does that mean you should? No. There's also a decent chance it'll result in downvotes for you, and when the question is deleted, you'll lose any rep you gain anyway
    – Zoe
    Sep 13 at 20:41
  • 6
    And, of course, if you disagree with the closure, the correct course of action would be to first get it reopened.
    – Kevin B
    Sep 13 at 20:42
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    @OlegValter I wrote a couple queries exploring exactly this a little bit ago! Here's a query pulling every (undeleted) post-closure answer; the current SEDE count is ~32k total answers on SO (~70 on Meta.SO). I also wrote another one to compile a list of users with the most of these answers.
    – zcoop98
    Sep 13 at 21:17
  • 2
    @zcoop98 yay, you just saved me time :) Cool, I'll adapt the latter one to display a ratio of answering after closure per uses - it is a very curious data point Sep 13 at 21:19
  • 8
    Ssssssh! Don't tell anyone! :D
    – Cerbrus
    Sep 13 at 21:22
  • 8
    I wish they'd close this stupid loophole. If it were "perfectly allowed" then the scripts in the page wouldn't prevent it. What is the purpose of having questions be closed if people are supposed to be able to post answers post-closure? It's an exploit for technically able opportunists.
    – khelwood
    Sep 13 at 21:54
  • 3
    Maybe it is imperfectly allowed. Sep 13 at 22:48
  • 3
    Why is this server-side grace period so long? It's hours, it could be like 5 minutes instead.
    – wim
    Sep 14 at 2:32
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    @zcoop98 Nice queries, but the datediff is bugged somehow for example this question shows in the table as over an hour delta but it was only a couple of minutes.
    – wim
    Sep 14 at 2:47
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    "Are there any actions taken against users who exploit this workaround?" - if you're a good person you will punish yourself with a feeling of guilt and lose sleep over it. If you're not a good person... well probably you will be doing more questionable things that are easier to spot and prove.
    – Gimby
    Sep 14 at 7:36
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    It's not bugged as such, @wim, just zscoop appears to have assumed that DATEDIFF returns the number of actual hours that have passed, where as it actually returns the number of "ticks". So, for example, DATEDIFF(HOUR,'10:59:59.500','11:00:00.000') would return 1 even though only half a second has passed, as the hour value has incremented by 1. Like wise DATEDIFF(YEAR, '20101231','20200101') would return 10, even though really 9 years and a day has passed (a common error users make when thinking they are calculating someone's DoB).
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 9:24
  • 9
    This has often happened to me. It's infuriating. Very often the reason for closure is that the question wasn't clear (to the person closing it), but if I was answering, that means it was clear enough to me. Sep 15 at 21:10
  • 2
    I've also felt @MichaelKay infuriation. And it's happened after I spend over an hour answering a question before. Grrr. Sometimes questions that are marked unclear are difficult to understand but not so unclear that it is unanswerable. I admittedly used this loophole to get around that question closure and on one other occasion. I try to forget this loophole exists and move on if a question gets closed that I was in the middle of answering, but it is nice having it around for those occasions where you have spent a considerably large sum of time writing up an answer. Sep 15 at 22:00
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I think the idea behind this difference in behavior is that a question should become unanswerable as soon as the user is made aware that it's been closed, and no sooner than that. If a user agent doesn't or cannot receive a client-side notification that the question was closed as soon as it happens then it seems unreasonable to let the user finish their answer none the wiser and block them only when they finally hit submit (sure, they could refresh the page before hitting submit, but I don't like to play that "workaround" game anymore). It's disrespectful of their time, and a poor user experience in general. However once a client is notified this feedback is passed on to the user to let them know not to waste further time attempting to answer the question.

Now, the premise of that last sentence is what I disagree with. Typically, it's true that questions that get closed shouldn't be answered to begin with — assuming they're off-topic and should be closed in the first place. But what if they were on-topic and shouldn't have been closed? Now you have to go through the entire close-reopen cycle, delaying an answer that was already in progress since before the question was closed. And if you're not a diamond mod or if the dupehammer doesn't apply, you can't get the question reopened alone, which means a potentially long and potentially indefinite wait for this process to complete. This whole reopening song and dance is an issue of its own, though, that I've complained about before, regardless of whether or not someone was already writing an answer as close votes accumulate.

Rather than having to do something shady such as exploiting client-server differences I'd like to see a policy that's enforced consistently. My wishful thinking is that users are just given a generous grace period to finish answering questions they started working on before they were closed, out of respect for their time and effort regardless of the question's status. But even aside from cases where people shouldn't have started answering questions in the first place because they are off-topic, this would also cause people who pay attention to timestamps (like me, hoho) to start asking on meta how answers were posted after a question was closed. There doesn't seem to be a way around this that would make sense to, and please, everybody.

Just my thoughts on this in long form, I don't really have an official answer. That said, if you were to ask me what I'd do with an answer that gets posted this way, I'd probably just leave it alone unless the question is blatantly off-topic and the answer doesn't need to exist. If I spotted this happening I'd go straight to the question and handle it accordingly. But I can only do that because I'm a moderator.

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    "My wishful thinking is that users are just given a generous grace period to finish answering questions they started working on before they were closed, out of respect for their time and effort regardless of the question's status" Please, can we get this. I am tired of seeing certain users constantly posting on closed questions... (I did ask for something like this before in truth).
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 8:49
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    The notification as you're editing is unreliable. More than a few times, including recently, I've finished writing an answer only to find that the submit button is disabled -- no banner or similar telling me that before I got there. But that's what's broken. Accepting answers server-side when the question has already been closed is a bug IMHO and always has been. The question is closed. It was closed for a reason. Letting people bypass that if they're In The Know is just wrong. SO should either do as you said and just always allow it, or disallow it for everyone at the same time. Sep 14 at 10:23
  • 4
    @Larnu what justification can you have for being upset people are providing answers to closed questions? What problems does it cause, there's an implication that they are doing it on purpose for some sort of gain that I cannot perceive
    – Mr. Boy
    Sep 14 at 10:39
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    I didn't say I was "upset", @Mr.Boy , just tired of it; perhaps a little frustrated. The main frustration is when I close a question as a duplicate and then certain individuals will answer the question (sometimes 10's of minutes later), with an answer that is the same as the linked duplicate.
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 10:41
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    Wondering whether it would be useful to have "late answers" automatically be deleted-until-reopened, or in any other way accepted provisorily… Sep 14 at 12:37
  • 2
    @MisterMiyagi I'd welcome some way of saving the work in progress answer until reopening. Right now there is the drafts system which I've found quite unreliable at the best of times. It's further a problem since you cannot start an answer to a closed answer if you open it after the closure. So even if I see a closed question that I think might merit reopening, I cannot even start writing an answer which to post later. Yes, I can save it off-site but it's very inconvenient.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 14 at 13:16
  • 2
    @Larnu I still can't see why you care, it's not your problem. But then I don't know how you are aware of it - does closing a question mean you get notifications on such things?
    – Mr. Boy
    Sep 14 at 14:47
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    @Mr. Boy: We care because we moderate the site. Same reason why a number of things happen on the site that bother me. Don't know about Larnu but I'm guessing the question gets bumped by the new answer and they see it, or they're like me and they occasionally get the urge to reload or revisit a question they voted to close.
    – BoltClock Mod
    Sep 14 at 14:49
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    I care, @Mr.Boy , because the goal of Stack Overflow is be a repository of knowledge, and having the answers to a specific question in one place is useful, and having lots of different answers all over the place is not. As for how I know, I can revisit a question after I close it, and I can also see the question has gained answers since I closed it when looking at my watched tags.
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 14:50
  • 3
    Interestingly when I come to SO via Google, I would say I am directed to closed-dupe questions more often that not. This seems to suggest they are useful.
    – Mr. Boy
    Sep 14 at 16:33
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    I don't think so. I think if somebody's already put significant effort into writing an answer and it gets closed, the user should be permitted to finish it.
    – Joshua
    Sep 14 at 16:51
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    @Mr.Boy "This seems to suggest they are useful." yes - as signposts to go to the single source of truth. Of you instead were to google a problem and get question A which only answers half of it or shows a very old way of doing it or otherwise doesn't paint the whole picture, then you'd probably want to continue googling. If you get to the page with All Of The Answers You Would Need, then you've reached your destinations. Dupes are pointers to AOTAYWN.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 14 at 17:38
  • 2
    @BoltClock "reasonable"? What madness is this?!
    – VLAZ
    Sep 14 at 17:45
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    @VLAZ often not the case, empirically. These questions frequently have accepted answers.
    – Mr. Boy
    Sep 14 at 17:52
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    @Mr.Boy I think that we have expressed how much of a problem duplicates are to handle, haven't we? You're just proving that.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 14 at 17:57
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Just an explanation of why this loophole bugs me.

Closed questions should not be answered. If that is supposed to be allowed, then the UI shouldn't attempt to block it. This is a rule being enforced selectively, which is not fair.

Closed questions should get fixed up by their author, or they get deleted. Having answers posted on them interferes with both of those.

Questions closed as dupes are supposed to be signposts: they should direct people to existing answers. Having new answers posted on them interferes with that.

If curators close a question, they are trying to help the site. It undermines that effort if people can bypass the closure and score some opportunistic rep points even after the question is closed. This undue leniency for answerers is disrespectful to the efforts of curators and the rules of the site.

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    My biggest gripe, honestly, is the lack of consistency; that some users have the client validations (permenantly) disabled, and so don't "suffer" the problem. I'm not against answers "in flight" being allowed to be posted, as someone has put the effort in to answer the question, and the fact they are answering it implicitly means they don't think the question should be closed. Though I think there is a difference between it being closed as a duplicate and as unclear; for the former i feel answers should just not be accepted any more as they just aren't helpful.
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 15:05
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    This is a basic software development bug. Good programmers would never allow a client-side hack to do something unwanted on the server-side. We should see server-side validation refusing answers that come after the page is closed. I, for one, would like to see a grace period of zero seconds. If the page should be closed, then don't answer it. If you think the question should not be closed, then optimize the question via an edit and campaign for its reopening, then answer. If it is a duplicate AND you have a unique/valuable insight, post it on the dupe target. Sep 15 at 1:52
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    This answer supposes that you agree with the person who closed the question. By definition, if you're answering the question, you probably don't agree. Very often the reason for closure was that the question was unclear, but what's unclear to one person may not be unclear to another -- sometimes it's simply that they aren't a native English speaker. Sep 15 at 21:15
  • 2
    @MichaelKay Then you can edit the question to help make it clearer, and vote to reopen. Or should we let anyone answer any closed question they like, because they might disagree with the closure?
    – khelwood
    Sep 15 at 21:40
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    @khelwood: "Or should we let anyone answer any closed question they like, because they might disagree with the closure?" No, but we can be pragmatic and reduce frustration for those who disagree with the close reason and already put significant effort into writing a good answer. Thus, I'm all-in for BoltClock's suggestion of an "official" grace period. I agree with you that selective enforcement is bad, but only with that. If the answers are truly worthless, that's what downvotes are for.
    – Heinzi
    Sep 16 at 7:26
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I'm putting this as an answer as well, rather than just a comment (which I have since deleted), however, I am just quoting another comment from Makyen♦ on a similar question (though I would not suggest these are duplicates):

Moderator Note: Intentional circumvention of system imposed limitations, including the limitation on not posting answers to closed questions, is considered abuse of the system and is grounds for warnings and suspensions.

So no, you should not intentionally try to avoid the system put in place to stop you answering. If you cannot answer a question, because it is closed (or some other reason), and you use some tool/method to get around this (such as you did here and removed the "disabled" tag) then that would be grounds for a warning or a suspension. If you also intentionally disable the client side validation permanently, so that you can post on said questions too, I suspect this would been viewed in the same way. How the mods or CMs would tell you got around it (or if they can) is a different matter altogether.

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  • 2
    I wonder if anyone ever actually has been suspended for this.
    – khelwood
    Sep 14 at 11:56
  • I doubt it, @khelwood . I would suspect it's very difficult to prove someone intentionally avoided the validation.
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 11:57
  • 1
    Indeed. Much easier just to get rid of the 4 hour loophole.
    – khelwood
    Sep 14 at 14:12
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I am tired of the practice of writing a stub answer, delete it, replace it with a real answer, and undelete it in case a question gets closed in the meantime. Bad closes on so-so questions happen a lot. I've answered questions that were quite answerable that are accumulating close votes because people who aren't familiar with the technology don't understand them.

Better to let the bypass work.

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    Temp-deleting stub answers is an obvious symptom that a user is either not contributing with integrity or that the community is doing a poor job of assessing the integrity of questions. If anyone finds themselves temporarily deleting stub answers, then some introspection is called for. Honestly I did this a few times, several years ago, and now I look back at how sad this technique is. There is far too much attention given to rep. I think more privileges should be potentially unlocked by reaching non-rep milestones. Sep 15 at 2:01
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    @mickmackusa: The community has been doing a very poor job of assessing questions that are yet unanswered.
    – Joshua
    Sep 15 at 2:28
  • I'm not seeing the activity that you are describing. I'm not calling you a liar though. Sep 15 at 2:30
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    @mickmackusa: Potentially tag specific; also I answer a lot of "why is this code crashing" questions by tracking down the specific bug in OP's question; while some others will downvote/close vote. This is somewhat controversial though if that were put to a debate in meta, answering them would win over closing them.
    – Joshua
    Sep 15 at 2:32
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    "Why is this code crashing" questions typically have very poor searchability. Before it should be answered, the question should be optimized. If the bug is unique to SO, then of course, I agree that the question should be retained. If it is a duplicate, then it doesn't matter how hard the bug was to find. Sep 15 at 2:38
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    +1 for "Bad closes on so-so questions happen a lot." Sep 15 at 21:20
  • 3
    Exactly this. In my own tiny corner there are far too many interesting questions being closed. The reasons given are absurd. The only plausible explanation is that the closers don't understand the question.
    – Cerad
    Sep 16 at 20:20
-1

There are no rules around this, because they've never been needed, because there's never been a problem (or at least, an overt one) with people abusing this loophole.

And personally I don't understand why you'd want to abuse it. I'm aware there are users on Stack Overflow who try to gain reputation as fast as possible, but I don't really see how posting answers on closed questions helps there (since predominantly, the people who ask questions that get closed are the same people who don't bother accepting answers on their questions that remain open).

So I don't see a need for rules in this particular case. Obviously, don't do this yourself, and if you see others doing it feel free to mod-flag, but apart from that... I don't think it's important enough to worry about, particularly when the platform enforces it well enough.

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  • Though I have been unable to find any explicit rules myself, I would suggest that Makyen's comment, at least, denotes there is a firm Moderator policy which they would enforce should they find a user is intentionally circumventing the ability to answer closed question. Though the fact that BoltClock doesn't mention it in their answer might mean it's something they aren't all aware of, or just something that never comes up (I'd guess the latter).
    – Larnu
    Sep 14 at 12:08
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    Some people write answers just to be helpful, with no regard for getting rep. Gamification is so '00s. Sep 15 at 15:06
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    It's nothing to do with rep chasing. It's seeing a poor user who has a problem, and you want to help the guy sufficiently to spend time composing an answer, and then some jobsworth closes the question on a technicality and leaves you unable to help, and a user frustrated that SO is unhelpful. Sep 15 at 21:18

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