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Here's the edit in question:

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22959522

Correct Edits


In the edit, I removed the incorrect capitalization, but feeling that this wouldn't warrant a revision on its own, I made sure to edit the grammar to be clearer and more concise.

I edited "No" -> "No it isn't redundant." to be its own sentence, to enhance future readability, and allow users to realize what the answer was talking about. Without this, people may be confused when simply looking at the question title and this answer (where "No" is not an appropriate response). This also shortens the sentence following it, and limits that sentences scope.

initialLayout You specify layout the image is in just before a render pass.

Was edited because the grammar was clearly incorrect and "You" is incorrectly capitalized. I changed this to:

initialLayout refers to the image layout just before a render pass.

Then I edited

It can be whatever, for example the finalLayout from a previous render pass. Or an undefined layout of a newly created image. Or a present_src layout of an image acquired from a swapchain.

to correct the incorrect usage of "Or" after a period, made this a list of things instead of separate sentences, and changed "it can be whatever" to "it can be anything":

It can be anything, for example the finalLayout from a previous render pass, an undefined layout of a newly created image, or a present_src layout of an image acquired from a swapchain.

The New Error


With those changes alone, I believe the edit would have been accepted. But when trying to fix this odd sentence, which was already incorrect,

If You have more subpasses, then in each of them You can use images in a different way and You don't have to worry about manual transitions.

I edited it to this, which is also incorrect:

If you have multiple subpasses, each of them you can use images in a different way and you don't have to worry about manual layout transitions.

when what I should have edited it to was this:

If you have multiple subpasses, in each subpass you can use images in a different way and you don't have to worry about manual layout transitions.

Unfortunately, it was only because of the rejection that I actually realized I had made this error.

I feel my other edits were worthwhile, and that AFAICT this was the only sticking point (and would have been edited anyway by out-of-queue acceptance).

Should I re-edit the post the same way but with the fix to my edit?

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    I think that edit helped the post a lot, and the line you mention was an improvement even though it wasn't completely fixed. In my opinion, they should have used accept-and-edit to fix that one line. – Davy M May 13 at 15:23
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    Given that both reviewers who rejected used the "superfluous" reason, if you attempt the edit again, my advice is to change less. Keep the changes like fixing the 'or's, the 'you's, and fixing the spelling of 'possible' but leave out things like changing "Then" to "Afterwards". The idea being to leave out anything that can be viewed as superfluous. – BSMP May 13 at 17:07
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    @BSMP Seems like you misunderstand the meaning of “superfluous”. What you describe and suggest doing is the complete opposite of making a less superfluous edit. Superfluous means, essentially, pointless or trivial. Making fewer significant changes would make the edit more likely to be classified as superfluous, not less. – Cody Gray May 14 at 1:58
  • I'd also reject your edit through queue. Reviewers don't have to be technically skilled in topic to easily judge when you are changing the meaning, so they click Reject instead of Skip. For such edits to be approved they have to be skilled. Wait until you get rights to edit without queue, then you are welcomed to participate in rollback wars instead ;) – Sinatr May 14 at 8:49
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    @Sinatr Yeah no, I'm not "waiting until I get rights" to improve this site. Its taken me years to get to this many points and it's hard to come up with worth while questions and answers, it could take me months to get to 2000. I'm not going to stop improving answers because of two reviewers. Additionally I don't believe I changed the meaning of anything. AFAICS nothing I changed was technical, it was all grammatical. Also if you'd really reject this through the queue it would be nice to know specifically why. – opa May 14 at 13:19
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    @CodyGray I disagree that changing "Then" to "Afterwards" is a significant change. They are synonyms in this case and one isn't more clear than the other. It's just a style preference. I think it's likely that the reviewers were just skimming the edit, saw a couple of changes like that, assumed the entire edit was that way and missed the grammar corrections. ("No" to "No, it isn't redundant." is a good change OP should keep though. That should have been in my original comment too.) – BSMP May 14 at 17:22
  • context context context. "Then" may otherwise mean "Therefore" but "Afterwards" avoids that ambiguity. "Superfluous" likewise is context dependant; i feel Cody Gray meant 'edits superfluous to the post' whereas BSMP perhaps referred to 'details superfluous to the edit'. for all we can tell, each reviewer could be using "Superfluous" in a different sense! – ocæon May 14 at 22:48
  • @BSMP Yeah, your reasoning is actually sensible once explained. Leaving out individual superfluous changes reduces the odds that a sloppy reviewer will wrongly judge at a glance that the entire edit is made up of superfluous changes; therefore "changing less" really can, in some contexts, reduce the odd of "superfluous" rejections. It's just that the first sentence "Given that both reviewers who rejected used the "superfluous" reason, if you attempt the edit again, my advice is to change less" sounds obviously stupid until you see the full reasoning; I had the same reaction as Cody at first. – Mark Amery May 16 at 11:03
  • How is "in each subpass" clearer than "then in each of them"? If you must tweak it, I'd ask that you at least opt for "then in each subpass". The word "then", while grammatically optional, is doing useful work here. Without it, my brain is momentarily unsure whether "in each subpass" is still part of the conditional clause or is the start of consequence clause. Using "then" adds clarity because it unambiguously signifies the end of the conditional clause, which prevents readers being led up the garden path. – Mark Amery May 16 at 11:35
  • I would have rejected it. You're not just correcting typos or blatant english errors, but completely restructuring what they've written. I write a certain way, and I wouldn't appreciate it if someone else modifies what I wrote just to fit their own concept of how a sentence should be structured. As long as it's easily understandable, I would leave it alone. That being said, I did once submit an edit on a wiki page to change a comma to a semicolon, which was technically correct, and it was rejected due to being superfluous. – 404 May 16 at 12:54
  • @MarkAmery I'm sorry but I don't agree. In context: "Then the image is automatically transitioned from the initialLayout to the layout specified for a given subpass. If You have more subpasses, then in each of them You can use images in a different way and You don't have to worry about manual transitions." Then implies it's because of multiple subpasses that you can do this, when in reality its even if using multiple subpasses, you can use images in a different way and not worry about layout transitions. Its additional information, not a therefore. Then leads up the garden path here. – opa May 16 at 13:35
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Yes, you should try again, but also try to improve the previous edit and review the reject reasons.
But note that you may be blocked from suggesting edits by a moderator if you made too many rejected edits.
When you reach 2000 reputation, you will be able to edit without waiting for reviewing of the edit.

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