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I've seen this discussed many times in the comments of questions, both those justly, and unjustly, marked as duplicates. Given the frequency of this issue, and the heat with which it is debated, it appears that the current approach isn't working, and poorly enough that it merits looking into a better approach.

Situation

Here is a common occurrence on this site:

I recently asked a question that some have suggested is a duplicate of an unrelated question, and others have said that it is not. Interestingly enough, some of the answers in the already existing question answer mine. And sometimes the answers that answer my question don't answer the already existing question (misinterpretation of the question).

However, upon initial reading of the already existing question and its answers, it looks like neither the question nor the answers relate to mine. Which is why I originally dismissed it and asked my own question.

In this case, is my question a duplicate if the answer is found in a seemingly unrelated question?

Problem I'm Trying to Solve

Primarily to mitigate the frequent conflict that occurs when questions are marked as duplicates.

Secondarily, to make the questions and answers more useful than they are now. Currently, there are questions with answers that apply in specific situations, that, while they may be useful for some new question, they do no answer the new question specifically, which severely hinders its usefulness and trustworthiness as an answer.

Thirdly, to mitigate the frequent occurrence of marking questions as duplicates when they, in fact, are not. Their answers might be duplicates, but if the questions are not, then they shouldn't be marked as duplicates.

Reasoning

It is my understanding that duplicates are considered duplicates on the basis of the question being the same, not on the basis of answers being the same.

My reasoning for this is that if an already existing question isn't the same, even if it is similar and contains the answers to the new question, it is essentially useless for the new question because anyone with the new question will see the old and seemingly unrelated question and assume that the answers there do not answer their's.

Marking a seemingly unrelated question as a duplicate also has the negative effect of casting doubt on the usefulness and interpretability of the other questions answers due to the difference in the questions. This is especially true if the answer requires code that is difficult to interpret.

In the end, it ends up looking like the new question isn't answered on the site, even if it is and is marked as such.

Suggested Alternative to Marking as Duplicate

The current approach is to either mark the question as a duplicate (what appears to be the preferred but very disliked and problematic method), or to copy/reword an answer from another question and post it in the new question (a less preferred method due to the duplication of the answer).

This policy tends to enforce the false idea that a question must either be a duplicate or a completely different question, when the reality is that it isn't always that black and white. Questions can be closely related enough that they have similar or even the same answers and still be counted as different questions.

So I would like to suggest the following approach:

Start by evaluating whether or not the new question and already existing question are the same.

A new question should only be marked as a duplicate if the new question and an already existing question are similar enough to be considered the same question, regardless of the answers.

(and even if the new question is included in the already existing question, if the new question is not the main focus of the already existing question then it is not a duplicate)

However, if the new question is similar to, but different enough from, an already existing question to merit a new question thread, then...

  • ...if the already existing question definitely has the answer to the new question:

If the responder personally knows the answer to the question, and that answer is found in an already existing question, they should post an answer that links directly to the existing answer, and explain in their answer how the linked answer applies to the new question even though the questions are different.

This gives the answer without duplicating the existing answer, and it gives the context needed to remove any doubts or confusion as to the usefulness and application of the linked answer to the new question. Posting it as an answer instead of a comment allows the asker to mark it as the correct answer, thereby making it clear to any future askers that that question has indeed been answered, instead of leaving them to wonder whether the comments ever answered the question.

  • ...if the already existing question might have the answer to the new question:

If the responder doesn't personally know the answer to the question, but has seen a similar (but still different) question, they should post a comment linking to the already existing question, stating in some way that they aren't sure if the answer is found in the other question.

If this does in fact lead to the question being answered, then either the responder or the asker should post the answer as an answer in the new question, just as the question would normally be answered. Again, this is for the sake of any future askers that may want to know for sure the answer to the new question.

This successfully provides assistance in finding the answer to the question without potentially falsely claiming that the question has already been answered elsewhere (something that does frequently happen with similar but different questions).

Example

For example, imagine seeing "What is 2+2?" marked as a duplicate of "What is 1+3?". They are extremely similar questions, and indeed have the exact same answer. However, the person asking the question may not have enough understanding to make the connection between the two questions and their answers, hence the usefulness in asking a new one, both for their sake and for the sake of those who may have the same question (and level of understanding) later.

With my approach, I would see the question "What is 2+2?", and instead of marking it as a duplicate (and potentially starting a conflict with the asker over it), since I know the answer, I would create an answer like the following:

Even though your question is different, there is a similar question here that has the answer you're looking for, which you can find here.

The answer works because, while 1+3 looks like (*) + (***), 2+2 works exactly the same way and looks like (**) + (**). Therefore they both end up with the same amount (****), being 4.

I hope that helps!

This may not be the best answer in the world, but it is certainly better than marking the question as a duplicate, or simply copying and pasting the answer "4" into the new question.

And who knows? Maybe someone will come into the question later just for the answer, but will leave with both the answer, and a better understanding of its relationship to other situations because of how I clarified.

Conclusion

My goal with this approach is to increase the usefulness and clarity of the questions and answers on the site, while minimizing the conflict caused by marking similar but different questions as duplicates of other questions. And I believe this approach does that.

TO BE CLEAR: I am not advocating that we never mark as duplicate! What I am advocating for, however, is only marking as duplicate when the questions are asking for the same thing even if they have similar or even the same answers.

Even if my new approach isn't used, there is definitely a change that needs to occur because of how often this conflict comes up, frequently resulting in spats between askers and commenters. We need a policy that supports the existence of the grey area and handles it clearly and respectfully.

This proposal is my suggestion to fill that gap (and in fact will be how I approach questions in the future, because, so far as I know, this approach isn't against current policy), and I hope that either this approach or something else can solve this problem.

What do you all think?


Here is a staff blog post by Jeff Atwood that I found interesting. It makes interesting statements like:

Trying to shoehorn a bunch of semi-related things into one arbitrary container in service of some Highlander-ish “there can be only one” rule is ultimately harmful.

I see some people in the comments advocating marking similar questions as duplicates, even if they are in fact asking something different, and this blog post appears to treat that ideology as too extreme for the site. Which is part of the point I'm trying to make. The goal of this site is to be useful for current and future users. Marking and closing a question as a duplicate when it is not such (especially when the answers are completely different) is detrimental to that goal.

Anyway, I believe I've received the response I kind of expected from this group. It was worth a try.

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    "It is my understanding that duplicates are considered duplicates on the basis of the question being the same, not on the basis of answers being the same." No, it's exactly vice versa. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 5 '18 at 17:54
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    One way to reduce the likelihood of a question being marked as a duplicate is to include in the question the prior research, e.g. "I've looked at this and this, but they only apply to single-threaded implementations. A parallel implementation is described here, but it does not use FroBozz V42." – HABO Jul 5 '18 at 17:56
  • @HABO - That is a great approach, but it will still frequently lead to questions being marked as duplicates even though they aren't in reality. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 17:58
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    @HABO: We already ameliorate dupes closed in error. A meta post usually sorts that out, although it's vanishingly rare. – Makoto Jul 5 '18 at 18:00
  • @Makoto - The problem is that we (not just you and I, but also a bunch of users) disagree on what constitutes a duplicate. If we had a clear definition that made the site clearer and more useful (which we don't), this problem would quickly be mitigated). – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:06
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    @Danegraphics: Of all the things which are "loosely" or "ambiguously" defined, I feel like duplicates is actually a lot more solid than other things. – Makoto Jul 5 '18 at 18:07
  • @Makoto - When I read "duplicate question" I think that the question is the duplicate, not the answer, which is what is being suggest here. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:10
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    Situation, reasoning, suggestion, conclusion... But what problem are you trying to solve? – techraf Jul 5 '18 at 18:18
  • @techraf - Primarily to mitigate the frequent conflict that occurs when questions are marked as duplicates. Secondarily, to make the questions and answers more useful than they are now. Thirdly, to mitigate the current torrent of marking questions as duplicates when they, in fact, are not. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:21
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    (1) The conflict usually is caused by questioner comparing the questions without reading the answers, or disregarding the answers that require application to their specific case. I don't see it a valid reason to change the way things are handled on SO. (2) Huh? By encouraging more and more fragmented/localised questions and answers? (3) Torrent? Please provide data and numbers to support the claim. – techraf Jul 5 '18 at 18:28
  • How is this related to etiquette??? – yivi Jul 5 '18 at 18:30
  • @techraf - (1) If the answer is written for a specific case, it decreases its usefulness and trustworthiness to the asker of the new but similar question. This is why many askers ask a new question in the first place. They don't understand or trust the answers on the other questions. (2) It is not fragmented if it still points to the other answer. Having the clarification of how the already existing answer applies to the new question is far better than a contextless reference to an answer to an unrelated question. (3) It may be just my experience, on this site, but that is my experience. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:37
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    In that sense, anything could be tagged etiquette, since comments can “break good etiquette” on many different situations. It really doesn’t apply. – yivi Jul 5 '18 at 18:41
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    (1) Yes. That's why SO tries to avoid proliferation of answers for specific cases. Exactly by the means of closing as duplicate. (2) For an experienced user it often takes more time to find and point to duplicate than writing an answer; and there is no reward for that. Any measure against that would lead to proliferation of fragmented and localised answers. The exact opposite of what SO users strive for. – techraf Jul 5 '18 at 18:55
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    (1) Show the data that questions are "frequently marked as the duplicates of specific questions instead of as duplicates of general questions". You can query SO for duplicate questions with duplicate:yes query. There are 389,599 duplicate questions as of this moment, please gather the data and add statistics which, and by what percent, is more frequent. (2) So you suggest newcomers should decide how things are not the people who already spent significant part of their time on building the community as is. Thank you for clarifying this point. – techraf Jul 5 '18 at 19:18
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This premise is flawed:

It is my understanding that duplicates are considered duplicates on the basis of the question being the same, not on the basis of answers being the same.

Standing advice contradicts this stance. It is often the case that duplicate questions are questions which ask the same thing, but it's also the case that a question closed as a dupe also implies that a similar question answers the exact same thing.

If we can't close questions as dupes because they're not asking - verbatim - about the same NullPointerException they're getting, then we're going to have a lot of fragmented and divided information on the site, which is what we really want to prevent.

  • The problem with that policy is what we have now. The information may not be fragmented and divided, but the information becomes FAR less useful and less trustworthy. An answer being the same does not by any means signify that the questions are the same. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 17:57
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    @Danegraphics: I fail to see your perspective here. If, hypothetically, you're asking why your application fails with a NullPointerException, and another person is confused as to why when they run their application that they're getting a NullPointerException, and even though the code to generate the error is radically different, you're suggesting that the root cause is not the same...? – Makoto Jul 5 '18 at 17:59
  • That is exactly what I am saying. Because the code is different, there is no indication that the cause is the same. In one instance it could be because the object wasn't instantiated correctly, in another it could be because they mistyped the name of the reference, and in yet another, it could be because it was referenced out of scope. The same error does not indicate the same cause. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:03
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    @Danegraphics: You're right, but those are the exception rather than the rule. It is very much the case that I have closed a question in error when the cause was something other than what it had seemed to be, and that was ameliorated in the principle way we do around here - a Meta post and more eyes on the question. In all reality the duplicate question should cover the scenario which would cause the error to be invoked, which is why one would vote to close in the first place. – Makoto Jul 5 '18 at 18:04
  • In my experience on the site, it tends to be the rule rather than the exception that the questions are in fact different, requiring an individually clarified answer. Far too often, those marking it as dup assume that the asker understands the similarity of the question and how its answer applies, which is often not the case. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 18:08
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    @Danegraphics: It is not unreasonable to expect users to be able to apply general information to their specific use cases. Some problems manifest themselves in manifold way, all requiring essentially the same solution. We cannot be here to hand-hold every single user through the same information. – Nicol Bolas Jul 5 '18 at 19:02
  • @Danegraphics If a question is not a dupe, the onus is on the asker to clearly state how it's not. If all we get is, "I get this error, and it's not working", well, what are we supposed to do? Tease all the relevant information out of him bit by bit until we figure out what he's asking? Or just dupe it, and leave it to him to figure out how it doesn't work? – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:08
  • @fbueckert - I'm not talking about the cases where a question is impossibly vague. I'm talking about the questions that are specific in such a way that they differentiate it from a similar question. I see far too many of those marked as dupes. When asked to clearly state why its not, they often do, only to be told "but it still works the same blah blah blah therefore dupe", which is both inconsiderate and unhelpful. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 20:12
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    @Danegraphics And if it still works the same, what's the problem? They're getting their answer, we're just not spoonfeeding it to them. We do require users here to exercise at least a modicum of effort on their own behalf. If it doesn't work, the onus is on the asker to differentiate how it's not. That doesn't seem like too much to ask. – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:13
  • @fbueckert - It doesn't work just the same though. I've seen users get their questions locked without an adequate answer just because it was a similar question that asked for a more specific answer. – Danegraphics Jul 5 '18 at 20:17
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    @Danegraphics And is that information in their question? Is it clearly stated? Do they tell us why the dupe doesn't work? Or do we just get a, "I read the dupe, but it doesn't work"? Please give us some concrete links of where you believe a question was duped, and you think it's wrong. Then we have a proper scenario to compare against. – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:19
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    @Danegraphics Okay. So show us some links, so we have specific items to discuss. – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:22
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    @Danegraphics A question closed for five years seems like a less than ideal example, but alright. The second dupe looks like a more applicable one. Now, look at the answer. It's short, concise, and shows exactly how to treat an Enum like a list. How does it not answer the question? – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:49
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    @Danegraphics Yes, and that gets back to the whole, "We won't spoonfeed you" bit. You are required to exert some effort of your own, and adapt it to work for your specific scenario. Either before asking, and showing us what you found and why it doesn't work, or after getting duped, and showing how it doesn't work for you. If all you do is copy and paste the answer and it doesn't work, and that's what you complain about, it's not going to get reopened. – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 20:57
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    @Danegraphics No, I'm saying that if the user is unable to articulate how it does not work, either through inability to adapt code or exercise any effort on their own, then we're not the place for it. You're looking for us to treat each user to a specialized tutorial that explains whole concepts and algorithms to them, whereas we're specifically assuming the user has a baseline level of ability to put more generic answers into practice. We'll help you with your task. We won't do it for you. This is a core difference between your help desk and our repository. – fbueckert Jul 5 '18 at 21:05
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My reasoning for this is that if an already existing question isn't the same, even if it is similar and contains the answers to the new question, it is essentially useless for the new question because anyone with the new question will see the old and seemingly unrelated question and assume that the answers there do not answer their's.

There is a saying: you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.

The same goes here. We have done our due diligence by clearly and unequivocally saying "your answer is over here". If a person wishes to disregard that advice, that's up to them. But so long as the advice is valid, we've done all we reasonably can.

For example, imagine seeing "What is 2+2?" marked as a duplicate of "What is 1+3?". They are extremely similar questions, and indeed have the exact same answer. However, the person asking the question may not have enough understanding to make the connection between the two questions and their answers, hence the usefulness in asking a new one, both for their sake and for the sake of those who may have the same question (and level of understanding) later.

The correct solution in this case is to create a canonical question. In this case, that question is "what is addition?"

The only way those could be questions is if the user didn't know what a number is or doesn't know how addition works. We expect people to know what a number is, so that only leaves how addition works.

Any question about a specific problem which can be resolved by understanding a general process should have a similar canonical question of this sort.

I've written a number of such canonical questions, which exist primarily to be used as dupe-targets for more specific expressions of the same understanding:

Consider the latter one in particular. It handles numerous versions of the same basic concept. It has a lot of questions linked to it that ultimately are all asking about the same thing, even if the OP of the dupes didn't know it.

That's how we handle this sort of thing; not with new answers on duplicate questions, but with proper questions. Questions are how we index information; answers are how we provide information.

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Questions are closed as duplicates when the problem is the same.

There are myriad ways of asking about a given problem. The value of duplicate-closing is in providing multiple paths from these different questions to a single set of answers that all address the same problem.

That doesn't mean that questions which concern different problems should be closed as duplicates if an answer happens to satisfy both; "6" is the answer to both "what is 2 times 3?" and "how many legs do insects have?", but those are not identical problems.

Similarly, none of this suggests that every answer to the target question will answer every duplicate; answers can be wrong, of limited usefulness, out of date or misleading in any context - that's why we have downvotes.

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