20

I'm wondering what the policy/guidelines are for users registering with user names that are obviously impersonating actual persons? For example: Hillary Clinton. Politics aside, is this something Stack Overflow is condoning?

Edit
From the comments, and links to other questions, apparently Stack Overflow is represented by a number of political figures:

I'm sure there are more, but I'm not going to search.

We should probably just close this question since it's been asked a few different times:

  • 8
    Names are usually not unique to a single person. But then there's the picture... – Stibu Mar 26 '16 at 20:41
  • 6
    I wonder what Donald Trump would say to this? – Rizier123 Mar 26 '16 at 20:42
  • 5
    @Rizier123 Unfortunately Barack is about to retire. – Bhargav Rao Mar 26 '16 at 20:45
  • 7
    What if Hillary really needed help understanding LINQ? What if that is the real Hillary but we are not believing her! Damn, I am off to get an autograph bbl. – Bhargav Rao Mar 26 '16 at 20:50
  • 9
  • 3
    There are hundreds of Jon Skeets – Martin James Mar 26 '16 at 20:52
  • 15
    Even Donald Trump impersonates Jon Skeet. – Martin James Mar 26 '16 at 20:53
  • 11
    @Rizier123 sorry, Donald had to leave. – ChrisF Mar 26 '16 at 21:05
  • 3
    Hillary seems to be distracted from campaigning by her new hobby: 11 questions in 16 days. – Josh Caswell Mar 26 '16 at 21:27
  • 31
    Donald Trump is going to make Stack Overflow great again! – Cody Gray Mar 27 '16 at 15:52
  • 2
    @MrLister No. Smeg-head. (Sorry, had to make up the 15-character minimum.) – beaker Mar 27 '16 at 16:19
  • 6
    Guys why can't we all just barry the hatchet and get along? – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '16 at 17:14
  • 2
    Bob Dylan asked about Python the other day. He had the picture and all. Then again, I wonder what the real Bob Dylans out there think about the fact that Robert Zimmerman stole their name. – jDo Mar 27 '16 at 17:41
  • 3
    "What's in a name?", asked Shakespeare. "This question", answered Stackoverflow. – Sajib Acharya Mar 27 '16 at 19:33
  • 6
    If either Hillary Clinton or Hillary Rodham Clinton were asking questions on SuperUser.SE or Security.SE about running a private email server, it might be believable, but c, c++, php, sql -- no. – shoover Mar 28 '16 at 20:37
22

There are a few problems with denying names.

  1. Do you have proof that those people don't actually have those names?
  2. While StackOverflow probably wants actual names, it is impossible to force people to use them.
  3. What harm is it to anyone on the site that they use those names.

In general while it is easy to say that people should not be able to use other names, you also can't. Those people have the right to call themselves whatever they want (whether it is their legal name or just a nickname).

Hope this maybe clears up some thoughts people are having about the topic.

  • 1
    If any of the actual people with those names complain though ... – o11c Mar 28 '16 at 0:43
  • 9
    So... who is to say that is not actually what they want to be called? And even still. You can't be telling me that there is only one "Donald Trump" in the entire world (name wise) – Trevor Clarke Mar 28 '16 at 0:49
  • 4
    @TrevorClarke For that specific name, I think he might actually be the only one... by now. :P – Siguza Mar 28 '16 at 1:17
  • 6
    Per mmyers' comment, maybe we should ask those people not to impersonate Stack Overflow users. – usr2564301 Mar 28 '16 at 1:20
  • 1
    @RadLexus Legally you have no way of proving that those are not their real names. It's not like StackExchange enforces names anyway.. Maybe if they did enforce names THEN maybe, but until then if you have "RadLexus" as your name than someone can have "Donald Trump"... That's just my opinion. – Trevor Clarke Mar 28 '16 at 21:20
  • While I agree with the premise of this answer, it's a bit misleading to say that it's impossible to force people to use their real names. Facebook does it (how well they do it is up for debate), and I bet if SE wanted to, they could do it too. – Cypher Mar 29 '16 at 6:17
  • @Cypher Related case. Out of any appreciation of this hoax, I think there will be people to use false identity anyway. IIRC SecondLife approach for age verification has been a fail too. – Tensibai Mar 29 '16 at 10:05
  • There has to be a limit to this though. I'd bet that usernames like "Joseph Stalin", "Adolf Hitler" etc wouldn't be tolerated. Then there would be the whole argument over "why this name but not this name?" Joke names like Lmao Tse-Tung etc would probably be border cases. – samgak Mar 29 '16 at 10:14
  • @samgak, we do have an Adolf Hitler. No sign of Joseph Stalin, though, at least for now. – Frédéric Hamidi Mar 29 '16 at 13:13
  • 1
    I believe this answer doesn't actually address the question where "obvious impersonators" is the operative phrase. The question is not about what someone may choose to be called; the question is specific about users intentionally impersonating someone, i.e., when the impersonating name and avatar image are one in the same, then this is case of impersonating someone else. Now, if Barack, Hillary, or any of the others listed in the question are THE Barack, Hillary, et. al., then that's a story the media needs to pick up: "Presidential candidates plz sendz codz". – Metro Smurf Mar 29 '16 at 13:23
  • @FrédéricHamidi Welp. I guess I lost the bet with... whoever I was making it with. He must be posting from Argentina. – samgak Mar 29 '16 at 13:30
  • @samgak No. Canada. – Trevor Clarke Mar 29 '16 at 14:29
-12

This is a valid election campaign tactic: impersonate your rival, humor him, let his well-known personality/speech be recognized in spoof posts, and then use screenshots on Facebook/Twitter.

Yes, everybody knows Trump/Sanders/Clinton are not Stack Overflow users. Yet, there is potential for slander.

I would ask moderators to:

  • put the impersonating accounts on a watch list;
  • close/delete non-technical/spoof/'funny' posts quickly, regardless of the moderator's own political views.

The potential damage to Stack Exchange in case it is perceived as a propaganda vehicle is immense. You don't want those IRS officials checking and re-checking every transaction...

  • 4
    Wait, if you're unfortunate enough to share your name with a presidential candidate you end up on a watch list? That's a terrible idea. And what does the IRS have to do with anything? – Frédéric Hamidi Mar 29 '16 at 9:30
  • @FrédéricHamidi - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRS_targeting_controversy – Deer Hunter Mar 29 '16 at 9:35
  • @FrédéricHamidi - those who share names of presidential candidates must have already gotten used to being on watch lists... – Deer Hunter Mar 29 '16 at 9:36
  • Thanks, I see what the IRS tried to do. Now we don't want to make the same mistake as them, right? – Frédéric Hamidi Mar 29 '16 at 9:37
  • @FrédéricHamidi - SE should, ideally, stay away from politics. – Deer Hunter Mar 29 '16 at 9:41
  • 2
    I completely agree. Putting people on watch lists and closing/deleting their posts quicker than other users' does not strike me as staying away from politics, though. – Frédéric Hamidi Mar 29 '16 at 9:42
  • @FrédéricHamidi - cutting propaganda is a good way to stay impartial. YMMV – Deer Hunter Mar 29 '16 at 9:47

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