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I want to share with you some observations and thoughts I made while using Stack Overflow more intensively over the last weeks.

  • Many/most of the very high-ranked users are posting many, many answers, but are asking almost no questions.
  • Obviously some users are like "answering-machines" waiting for new questions to answer freshly asked questions.

I'm wondering now:

  1. What is the motivation for these contributors? Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation? I'd assume the latter.
  2. Doesn't this behaviour result in lower quality or at least limits the level of quality of answers? (mid to long-term)
    comment: These people have a very high-level of expertise - that's out of the question.
  3. Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow? I'd assume they are encountering and dealing with more subtle problems according to their skill-level and finding better solutions for that.
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    Don't forget it is still Winterbash, behavior over the last few weeks is not a good basis to jump to conclusions. re-evaluate your observations in 6 to 8 weeks ... – rene Jan 6 '17 at 10:03
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    You can't know, or even expect to fathom an average of, people's motivations for answering. I expect it goes right across the spectrum. As long as the answers are good, who cares, right? – Clive Jan 6 '17 at 10:05
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    1. Most of questions require basic knowledge rather than expertize and after getting some experience we no longer need to ask we can do r&d and solve the problem. My asked my last question on November 2, 2015 and i asked only 4 questions in 2015 no question in 2014 – NullPoiиteя Jan 6 '17 at 10:13
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    "I'd assume last" - why? Why would you assume that pretty-much-meaningless numbers are more important to high-rep users than having a positive impact on the world? (I don't understand your point 2 at all... particularly the second sentence, which half seems to say that you think the high rep users do have a high level of expertise, and half seems to say it's unbelievable that they would have a high level of expertise.) – Jon Skeet Jan 6 '17 at 10:23
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    On why high rep users don't ask, maybe because of the shame related to asking. Idea taken from here – Tensibai Jan 6 '17 at 10:37
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    Not that I am in the target group being referred to here but I've yet to ask a question because so far, Stack Overflow already had all the answers. All you need is to be pretty decent at searching, and patience. Those are traits I associate with experienced people, so to me it makes sense that such people answer a lot but have few questions. – Gimby Jan 6 '17 at 10:49
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    I'd assume they are encountering and dealing with more subtle problems according to their skill-level and finding better solutions for that. one reason why there's often not much incentive to do so it that explaining a complex/subtle problem is a lot of work, and often enough it is more time-efficient to research the problem yourself than sit down and compose a good question from it – Pekka 웃 Jan 6 '17 at 10:55
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    For me, when I passed 20k, rep was no longer a factor. What motivates me now is to improve the quality of the site's content. This means I've got days where I lose more rep on downvotes, than I gain from the few questions I answer. – Cerbrus Jan 6 '17 at 11:17
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    Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation? I'd assume the latter. um... why, exactly? When you have, say, 50,000 reputation points, what is the point in accumulating 50,000 more? – Pekka 웃 Jan 6 '17 at 11:17
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    "Many/most of the very high-ranked users are posting many, many answers, but are asking almost no questions." Personally I know how to search and get answers to my questions... Everything I need to search for has been a duplicate on stackoverflow. – epascarello Jan 6 '17 at 12:11
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    I feel like the current set of close reasons has a stronger effect on the type of questions asked than the decision of whether or not high reputation users ask questions. Also, often when I have a question, it already has an answer here (which is amazing really) - either that or there is a bug in third party which can be unfortunate. Many high reputation users have very informed opinions which are only kept to themselves with regards to the main site, and asking for another expert's informed opinion (which is something I would be interested in) isn't allowed at present. – Travis J Jan 6 '17 at 19:41
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    My motivation. – user2357112 Jan 9 '17 at 5:48
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    Ever since I got to about 100 rep I have answered questions solely because I am bored with the questions people ask at work, and the questions on SO are more varied. (And trying to answer them teaches me a lot of new tricks, etc.) – YowE3K Jan 9 '17 at 6:28
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    I'm not exactly a "high rep" user, but personally speaking, the reason I don't ask many questions is that out of every 100 questions I have, about 99 are solved by the time I'm done making a MCVE / formulating them properly. As to why I answer, because it's fun and sometimes I find a question that tickles my fancy or makes me go "Hey, I could answer that" – Magisch Jan 9 '17 at 7:12
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    When I joined SO around 6.5 years ago my motivation was very simple. When I answered a question, people upvoted and/or accepted my answer or even just said a thanks it gave me a feeling that may be I'm not a complete trash, may be I'm not a fu***** loser as I heard/felt many time ... and may be I can be off some help to other people too. Even after 6.5 years, it still remains my main motivation. – taskinoor Jan 9 '17 at 7:16
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  • Many/most of the very high-ranked users are posting many, many answers, but are asking almost no questions.
  • Obviously some users are like "answering-machines" waiting for new questions to answer freshly asked questions.

I'd say that these conclusions are broadly accurate.

For more thoughts on observation #1, see:

As far as observation #2, this is pretty much the central mechanism that makes Stack Overflow work. We get a lot of questions. If we didn't have "answering-machines" dedicated to monitoring these new questions and posting high-quality answers, the site would basically stop working.

In fact, it has been pointed out as a concern that the rate at which high-reputation users are answering questions has declined over the years.

  1. What is the motivation for these contributors? Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation? I'd assume the latter.

I'm not sure why you'd assume the latter. Most of the top answerers already have tons of rep, way more than they know what to do with. Once you get past 10k, you have virtually all the moderation privileges you need, and the additional reputation won't even buy you a cup of coffee.

That's not to say that there aren't people out there who are doing it for the reputation. But in my experience, if you're just in it for the rep, the novelty wears off rather quickly. I'd even go so far as to say if reputation is your sole motivation, you're doing it wrong. It's certainly not why I'm here.

The top answerers are all here for different reasons, and to know for sure, you'd have to ask them, but here's my list:

  • the satisfaction of helping people
  • the desire to improve my knowledge and learn new things
  • the ability to subject my existing knowledge/skills to expert review
  • the fact that Stack Overflow does Q&A right, with high quality standards, minimal chit-chat, absence of social-networking features, and so on.

Is it altruism? Well, that's complicated. Altruism is complicated. Parts of the motivation certainly are altruistic. But what if you derive satisfaction from helping people? Then are you behaving altruistically? Not really—you're actually pursuing selfish motives. But this complexity of motivations is why the community works! Humans aren't quite altruistic enough to do all of this for no personal benefit or satisfaction, but many of us are altruistic enough to see the value in helping others.

  1. Doesn't this behaviour result in lower quality or at least limits the level of quality of answers? (mid to long-term)

I'm not following the logic here. I guess this is an allusion to the fastest gun in the west problem, where the "gamification" of Q&A seems to encourage users to hastily answer a question just to gain reputation? That's been discussed at length, so I don't really want to rehash it.

It is decidedly not what motivates me. I'm equally likely to answer an old question as I am a brand new one, and in either case, I'm not interested in getting my answer posted quickly—I'm interested in writing the best, most thorough, and most accurate answer that I can. (Earlier today, I spent a fair bit of time answering this question, which had already received an upvoted and accepted answer—and one I wasn't even necessarily disagreeing with.)

I recognize that I might be unusual in this, but then I'd turn the question around: do you have any actual evidence for the supposition that posting rapid answers will decrease the quality of answers over time? It's not like Stack Overflow is a brand new website. It's been around for a long time, long enough that you could go back and compare the quality of answers from 2009–11 to answers from 2015–17. Anecdotally, going by what I've seen, there is no such decline in quality. If anything, the quality has increased because we have more participants to post answers, review answers, make edits, leave comments, etc. etc.

Even the FGITW problem isn't quite what you're concerned about here. With FGITW, people post short, arguably insufficient answers just to be first, and then flesh them out into real answers later. That's not a long-term quality problem, just a short-term one.

  1. Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow? I'd assume they are encountering and dealing with more subtle problems according to their skill-level and finding better solutions for that.

Maybe. I don't know. High-reputation users do tend to ask questions, just not very many of them. Generally, this isn't because they already know everything, but rather because they know how to determine the answers. Much of the time, when I set out to determine the answer to a problem, I find that it has already been answered—often on Stack Overflow. So no, I don't think the quality of our questions is necessarily suffering because high-reputation users aren't asking more of them.

But if you have ideas for encouraging people to ask better, more interesting questions, then feel free to share them. I certainly don't think we should do anything to discourage experts from asking questions. In fact, I'm a big critic of things I perceive as attempts to turn this into a "debug-my-code" site, because good programmers don't need other people to debug their code. They'll have more complex, nuanced, and interesting problems that don't just simply revolve around a code dump—and we need these questions too, to keep other experts engaged and participating.

I'll also just point out that asking a good question is extremely difficult—more difficult than posting a good answer. High-reputation users know what quality is, and they apply those same quality standards to themselves when composing questions. It takes longer to write a good question than it does to write a good answer. Pretty easy to imagine which one they think is a better use of their limited time.

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    Well there is one reason to keep grinding reputation - to be able to spend it on bounties and have free reign in downvoting without it ever risking to affect your privilege level. Of course if you have 150k plus you're basically set for life ;) – Gimby Jan 6 '17 at 12:56
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    the additional reputation won't even buy you a cup of coffee -> But it will buy you something better: unicorn paintings. – Martin Tournoij Jan 6 '17 at 14:26
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    Well observed: the ability to subject my existing knowledge/skills to expert review is certainly one of my main reasons. And when subsequently shot down, I'm not discouraged by the criticism but try to learn from it. (Well, usually.) – usr2564301 Jan 6 '17 at 19:18
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    Absolutely spot on, at least speaking for myself. – deceze Jan 7 '17 at 12:11
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    "Is it altruism? Well, that's complicated. Altruism is complicated. Parts of the motivation certainly are altruistic. But what if you derive satisfaction from helping people? Then are you behaving altruistically? Not really—you're actually pursuing selfish motives." This! I am a firm believer that true selflessness doesn't actually exist; we all do things for our own benefit, even if that benefit is the warm fuzzy feeling you get from helping others. Nice to see it written down better than I have ever managed ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 8 '17 at 15:36
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    Just to add, a lot of experienced users don't post [as many] questions because the process of writing a decent question (which an experienced user will tend to strive for) generally results in finding the answer anyway (something the less experienced users would do well to learn ahem). Though I've posted more questions lately as I have been working with slightly unfamiliar technologies, so there's always scope. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 8 '17 at 15:38
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    Personally, I find that I usually learn a lot more writing an answer than I do asking a question, although that may be because I can find answers for most questions online already, and thus don't actually need to ask them. – Justin Time Jan 8 '17 at 17:21
  • There is a huge difference between 20K and 10K. Instantly deleting questions/answer instead of waiting 3 days is probably the most effective moderation tool I could think of. Not to mention the dupe hammer which you won't get at 10K. – David Arenburg Jan 9 '17 at 7:29
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    The dupe hammer doesn't have anything in particular to do with reputation. It's all about holding a gold badge. You need a total score of 1k in 200 answers to get a gold tag badge, so if you were hyper-focused, you could answer only questions about a particular topic and earn a tag badge without getting to 20k. Also, instantly deleting questions isn't as satisfying as you'd think it would be. They have to be closed first, which is always the bigger battle. @david – Cody Gray Jan 9 '17 at 12:12
  • @CodyGray Well, I know what is a dupe hammer is (as I have one) and I only meant that it is literally impossible to get one if you''ll stop at 10K (because big part of this rep will be from accepted answers/questions/other tags)- so in order to get one, you will need to get at least another 4-5K. Regarding deletion- you are right regarding the questions, but bad answers is very easy to delete with only 3 votes which can be done within seconds using a chat room or such. Same goes for questions- 5 low reps to close and another 3 20K> to delete. Either-way, 10K is far from enough for me at least. – David Arenburg Jan 9 '17 at 12:19
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit From what I've heard, most of Ayn Rand's oeuvre is dedicated to expressing that very concept as eloquently as possible. Read any of her work? (I know she's pretty widely despised for her politics, and that her work and her politics are pretty inextricable, but though I haven't read her myself, I've been surprised to meet several fairly left-leaning individuals who seem to quite like some of her novels.) Even without reading any of her novels (which do strike me as probably longer than they are worthwhile), you could probably find a pithy quote online. – Kyle Strand Jan 9 '17 at 17:58
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About my personal experience.

What is the motivation for these contributors? Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation?

Neither. Well, rep is nice and all. But basically it's because answering an interesting question is like solving a puzzle, kind of fun.

You can always find questions about things you alone wouldn't have wondered about. You can encounter all kinds of interesting situations, some examples:

  • An user complained about his webpage being rendered incorrectly on Firefox. Didn't even bother to make a MCVE, but the problem drew my attention. It was a bug about writing modes. Back then I didn't have much idea about Firefox's code, Mercurial, etc. but I managed to find the problematic code and fix it with the help of Jonathan Kew. It was later noticed that as a sideways effect this fixed a sec-low crash.
  • Some user had problems about a web API being buggy on Firefox. Testing that, Firefox crashed. I managed to write a sec-moderate exploit which reproduced that behavior. I reported it and now Mozilla acknowledges me as a "security researcher". Sounds great!

I also learn a lot. For example, some of the first JavaScript questions I asked after becoming a Stack Overflow user were rather basic. Now I have a solid knowledge of the language. That's because when I learn a language I don't go read the standard, because it's difficult and boring. But when I answer I often include quotes from the spec, and that's easier. Eventually one becomes familiarized with it, and learn the language deeply.

Additionally, when you answer, you also read the answers from other people. There are lots of experts here, which may solve the problem much differently than you. So you notice what you could have done better and learn new ideas.

Doesn't this behaviour result in lower quality or at least limits the level of quality of answers?

I don't see why.

Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow?

Maybe.

However, when I have a question about a language of my expertise, I just go to the spec (as I explained, answering familiarized with the spec). That's because asking a good question is hard, and then I would need to wait an undefined amount of time until someone posted a satisfactory answer.

There aren't much incentives in asking at Stack Overflow when you can find the answer earlier if you don't ask.

Moreover, questions I would ask tend to be more theoretical and localized, and don't always interest the community.

For example, see my How does the removal of attribute nodes affect attributes NamedNodeMap in DOM4?, only has 39 views in 6 months. I guess that's because most people who use the DOM don't know attribute nodes, the NamedNodeMap interface nor what's different in DOM4. Or even what the DOM is.

Or Set DOM element's attribute whose name does not match XML's Name production, only 31 views in 9 months and even a downvote, possibly by someone which didn't see the real-world utility of what I was trying to do, and just thought it was bad practice.

What I mean is that the questions which will be most helpful to the community are the basic ones. But once you have enough knowledge of a language to be able to give lots of answers, then you no longer have these basic questions. You already know the answer. So usually you don't post them (unless e.g. you want to write a canonical question, which is so hard).

And about languages outside my expertize, I rarely ask because usually it's already on Stack Overflow. I guess answering improves your ability to search things in a successful way.

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    "answering an interesting question is like solving a puzzle, kind of fun." this. And money. – Braiam Jan 7 '17 at 18:04
  • This, this, this. In fact, sometimes when the answer is very short, I'll put it in as a comment -- in part because I don't feel like I "deserve" any rep for such a simple answer, but I do still want to help the OP. Incidentally, I know for myself, to the extent that my answers have dropped off it's precisely because it's gotten less interesting. There are fewer truly interesting questions, and more really bad questions that make finding even somewhat-interesting questions a slog. – yshavit Jan 9 '17 at 7:29
  • "But basically it's because answering an interesting question is like solving a puzzle, kind of fun." Hmm. You said interesting questions. However, many answered questions are not very interesting. I guess some guys just answer everything. I wonder if they really have the fun, you say they should have. – Trilarion Jan 9 '17 at 9:00
  • Agree. For me it's a mix: I answer easy questions to help newcomers and I answer tricky questions because they're fun to unravel and I often get to learn something in the process (or rediscover something I had forgotten). – Matthieu M. Jan 9 '17 at 10:40
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What is the motivation for these contributors? Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation? I'd assume the latter.

Speaking for myself, it's classic addictive behavior.

Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow? I'd assume they are encountering and dealing with more subtle problems according to their skill-level and finding better solutions for that.

Exactly, they are finding better solutions (themselves), meaning they don't need to post the questions. You do not sit at your computer pondering what question you might ask; you ask a question when you have one you can't solve yourself. FWIW I've asked 93, which might be a bit above average.

  • There are so many unanswered questions in Stack Overflow. Probably many of them are bad, unspecific, etc. But I'm sure, answering the remaining good questions would be to costly compared to the benefit in reputation. So it's easier for - all - Stack Overflow users to jump into new asked questions and re-utilize proven knowledge – Karl Jan 8 '17 at 11:14
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I am not High-Rep but I answer more often than I ask questions. This has a very simple reason.

Most questions I'd ask have already been answered in one form or another. When I search for an answer on SO, most of my questions (mostly related to ruby-on-rails, erlang and postgresql) have already been answered in very high detail. Even if the answer does not fit my question 100%, the answers are mostly good enough to solve my problem.

As for why I answer: I like to contribute. The gamification elements (Rep, Winter-Bash Hats, etc.) are part of it. But for me it's more important to take part on a platform that has helped me sooooooooo many times.

  • agree with you. Also my experience. The point is: questions are "good enough" but do they get better or stay at the same level? – Karl Jan 7 '17 at 10:40
  • sorry, I meant "...answers are good enough..." of course – Karl Jan 7 '17 at 11:36
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    @Karl: I think they mostly stay at the same level. But sometimes a new answer gives some additional detail, wich I wasn't aware of before – Mathias Vonende Jan 7 '17 at 12:13
  • Agreed. In my case, although I have been using SO and other sister-sites for 3-4 years, I felt guilty that I was not contributing. So I officially joined 8 months back, mainly to contribute. Then I realized, as pointed out, most simple questions, and even many complex scenarios have been addressed in detail - so even if I wanted to build rep, it is going to be at a very slow rate! – NameRakes Jan 8 '17 at 14:44
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I'm not a very high ranked user myself, but here's my try:

What is the motivation for these contributors? Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation?

It can be both, and this will really vary per user. You need a basic level of reputation in order to make efficient use of the site; I'm still advancing slowly to 20k, to be able to delete answers and vote to delete questions more quickly. More reputation also increases your chances in a ♦ moderator election, and you might receive swag upon reaching a certain undocumented reputation level.

Doesn't this behaviour result in lower quality or at least limits the level of quality of answers?

No, why should it? Answer quality is hard to measure in numbers, but even if users answer only for the reputation, low(er) quality answers will attract less upvotes.

Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow?

That might be, but I doubt it will be measurable. Almost all questions I encounter during development have already been asked before. If I come across such a question, and its quality is suboptimal, I'll edit it to make it more clear (if I have the time). This is probably the nature of Stack Overflow, being focused on concrete programming problems. Those are generally easy to ask, and harder to answer.

  • Is it one of your long-term targets, to be a moderator? I dare say that's not your typical SO user's goal (if such a creature does exist). – usr2564301 Jan 6 '17 at 19:22
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    I was merely pointing out one of the possibilities. Another one would be the swag. – Glorfindel Jan 6 '17 at 19:26
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What is the motivation for these contributors?

There are probably almost as many answers to this as there are users.

Is it altruism or are they hunting for reputation? I'd assume the latter.

Altruism, rep hunting, boredom, programming practice...

Doesn't this behavior result in lower quality or at least limits the level of quality of answers? (mid to long-term)

Motivations don't necessarily affect the quality of the results.

Wouldn't an increased participation of these users in asking increase the overall quality and knowledge base of Stack Overflow? I'd assume they are encountering and dealing with more subtle problems according to their skill-level and finding better solutions for that.

My answer to that question is another question: Asking what? The information people need is probably already out there. Stack Overflow has been around for years, and other programming resources have been around for decades. Some programmers are better than others at finding the information they need on their own, via Internet searches, practice, tutorials, documentation, and so on. The better a given user is at doing this, the fewer questions they need to ask.

My first post here was a JavaScript question. I had learned from W3Schools how to access and modify a single element, but I couldn't figure out how to extend that to a group of elements. I thought there must be a simple way to perform a single action on such a group (like vector operations in R or Julia), but no such functionality exists. It would require writing some JS code, which I didn't know how to do. Since I didn't know it would require actual code, it wasn't technically a "give codez," but it was obvious that I hadn't learned the language. I got some answers I didn't understand, and I've let the question sit there as an example of insufficient research (I had spent hours looking for the magic word, but no time at all learning the language).

Now let's look at a couple of my more recent questions.

Have you ever tried to debug Android apps without a modern PC or proper drivers for your Android device? I have. After significant research, I concluded that I couldn't figure it out myself, so I asked a question. On the plus side, it got me the Tumbleweed badge. On the other hand, the only activity it got from users other than myself was a single upvote several months later. There are two factors to this: first, it's a tough question. Second - and more importantly - it's not a useful question. Many people need to know how to center a widget on the screen. Very few people need to know how to retrieve tracebacks when their PC is eight years old and therefore missing key emulation features (HAXM, Hyper-V, AMD-V, etc.) and their phone manufacturer is listed in the official Android driver page but the link points to ancient drivers for a single obsolete model. The question is very localized - it's not bad per se, but it is of interest to very few people. Technically, that means it isn't useful.

...Except to me. I would've liked to resolve that issue and make progress with Android development. Unfortunately, the folks sitting around watching for new questions passed over this one (due to difficulty, hassle, disinterest, etc. - I'm not complaining; I pass over lots of questions, just like everyone else), and it didn't attract enough interest to eventually catch the attention of anyone who could or would answer it.

That dramatically reduces my confidence in getting answers to difficult programming questions on this site.

Next, I asked a question about the specified behavior for a Python standard library module. I'm sure you've all seen questions from new users along the lines of "my program won't compile, therefore I'm sure I've found a bug in the compiler; please confirm" or "I haven't looked at any documentation, therefore this behavior is totally undocumented; please explain it." Well, this time there actually is an issue with an official project or resource... probably. The question got a few upvotes and a single outside comment, then fizzled out with no conclusion. I can't be sure that I've found something.

That makes me less likely to ask questions here about potential issues with existing projects.

TL;DR: More experienced users have fewer questions to ask, and the questions they do have are less likely to get answers, discouraging them from asking even those questions.

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I'm not a high-rep user, but I was a frequent asker. I have 169 answers and 41 questions.

When I was new to the site (and in the field), although many of my questions were honest asks for help, I thought about questions as potential rep mines and my dream was to ask a viral question. Although I got lucky with one, I had to realize that asking questions is hard and has some downsides, too:

  • I'm pretty good at finding things, so most of the time I realized that my question was already asked.
  • Even if I wasn't able to find my question, usually after I asked it, it turned out that I'm still not perfect at finding because it was asked but with a title I hadn't thought about.
  • Asking a lot of mediocre questions is not a rep gold mine.
  • When you look back at your questions you asked a few years ago, you get really ashamed that you weren't able to find a solution for something that easy.
  • Questions show things you don't understand.

So around 2014, I explicitly decided that I will not ask questions in the future, until:

  • It is a self-answer.
  • I'm in really deep need for a solution I can't find.
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    Well, that is kind of a shame to hear. Obviously you shouldn't ask questions that you can find the answer to, and obviously you should spend some time searching, but if you really can't find the answer, then there are probably other people that can't find it either, so you should ask the question! Note that there's no shame in having your question closed as a duplicate. And there's no shame in not knowing/understanding things; no one knows everything—at least not until they ask! – Cody Gray Jan 8 '17 at 16:39
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    @CodyGray I agree, but after I changed my views I simply searched until I found a solution. I can't really recall a time when asking a question was necessary. Of course if I thought the solution would be a help for others I wrote a self-answer, that's the reason why I listed that one as an exception. – totymedli Jan 8 '17 at 16:47
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    Good. Nothing wrong with exhaustive searching. As long as you're not holding back on asking when you legitimately can't find things! – Cody Gray Jan 8 '17 at 16:53
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The dynamics are a typical 'reward system' where reputation points become valuable just to have. Maybe people think it will help with job searches, maybe it's just bragging rights, who knows. But I think those are the two primary motivators.

It might be that these high rep people don't ask questions for fear of looking dumb, or not knowing an answer, or not being willing to research their own questions.

I had a question a few weeks ago at another exchange. I asked it. Then I answered it because I found the correct answer before anyone else posted to it. So, I try, but I am a fairly humble guy. So that would be normal behavior you would expect of everyone, were it not for paragraph #2.

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Another motivation would probably be "guilt" (not sure if the best word, maybe "repayment" fits better)

A lot of questions have good quality answers, I'm sure a lot of those high rep users would often search for solutions to their own problems, and find them on stack overflow.

They'd then feel like they need to repay the community for the help they got. If they didn't they'd feel guilty and repay the community.

  • Probably not applicable for psychopaths however. – mateos Jan 8 '17 at 15:02
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    Rather than "guilt" you might be thinking of "reciprocity." – David Thomas Jan 8 '17 at 16:03
  • Definitely the word. – mateos Jan 9 '17 at 3:12

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