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I'm wondering , are there high rep people who were question banned in the past? of course this is not an insult, we all make mistakes and personally I respect the people who fail but then succeed in a high record, more than the people who succeed at the first time, those are still good, very good actually, but this is my opinion which can be wrong of course.

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    what is your definition of "high rep"? – psubsee2003 Dec 28 '14 at 15:57
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    "I respect the people who fail but then succeed [...] more than the people who succeed at the first time [...]". So if a surgeon operates on you and messes the operation and has to cut you open a second time to finally succeed, you'd respect that surgeon more than the surgeon who would have done it right on the first try. Quite peculiar. – Louis Dec 28 '14 at 15:58
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    Measure twice, cut once @Louis – Ňɏssa Pøngjǣrdenlarp Dec 28 '14 at 15:59
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    Yes, I'm a prime example. I've had three question-bans, and yet have gone on to be moderately high-rep (when using the average reputation). – AStopher Dec 28 '14 at 20:28
  • I was question banned on meta a long time ago, way before the MSO split. There might be others too. – prusswan Dec 29 '14 at 14:40
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    Lets echo psubsee's question. What do you consider hi rep? @cybermonkey and I have a different idea of what that might mean. – paqogomez Dec 29 '14 at 21:07
  • @paqogomez True, it all depends on prospective. However as the OP of this questions seems unwilling to participate in their own question I guess we'll never know what they mean by that, especially since they seem to be intentionally ignoring the question: puu.sh/dOMkV/dade577d16.jpg – AStopher Dec 29 '14 at 21:08
  • @paqogomez I mean higher than let's say 1k or 2k. – niceman Dec 30 '14 at 14:34
  • @niceman Don't delete your questions. I got question banned for indefinite time for deleting my own questions. The ban was lifted a few months latter although I did nothing. Had to create another account, which is now merged with the original account. – user2330678 Dec 30 '14 at 21:10
  • @user2330678 thanks I won't – niceman Dec 31 '14 at 12:28
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In a word, yes.

Stack Overflow's model can be a bit intimidating to new users, and we all make mistakes. There are plenty of people who have overcome question bans in the past and learned how to use Stack Overflow effectively enough to reach high reputation levels.

I assume you're asking this because you have recently received a question ban yourself and are wondering if you have any chance at making an impact on the site, and the answer is, of course, yes. I recommend thoroughly reading through the Help Center and Meta FAQs to familiarize yourself with the workings of the site, and hopefully you'll be able to pull yourself through and help plenty of people out in the process.

Good luck!

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    Are you aware of specific people yourself or just assuming that probably there are? (not asking you to name them) – Martin Smith Dec 28 '14 at 16:02
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    @MartinSmith I haven't been here long, but I have seen a few people pull themselves out of question bans as sub-200 rep users after opening a discussion here on Meta and go on to be 10k users (although I'm not sure what the OP's definition of a "high rep user" is). – AstroCB Dec 28 '14 at 16:04
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    yes exactly, I received a question ban and still not lifted – niceman Dec 28 '14 at 16:13
  • good advice, I want to delete all my questions so to come back and undelete them to make them better but I'm affraid of doing so, do you advice that ? the reason for this is to not disturb people with bad questions when searching on SO. – niceman Dec 28 '14 at 16:14
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    @user2397162 I'd recommend taking a look at this FAQ and fixing up some of your old questions. – AstroCB Dec 28 '14 at 16:14
  • @AstroCB sorry, forgot @, do you advise I do that or not ? – niceman Dec 28 '14 at 16:40
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    @user2397162 I wouldn't delete them if you can avoid it (as it probably won't help your question ban to do so), but under normal circumstances this would be okay (to remove your question/answer from the public eye while you're fixing it up). In this case, however, it's better to just edit them as you go, fixing them up gradually. I'd also take a serious look at that linked FAQ, as it tells you the best way to go about getting out of a question ban. – AstroCB Dec 28 '14 at 16:42
  • @AstroCB that's why I considered deleting, I want to read How to ask thoroughly, I need time before editing my questions . – niceman Dec 28 '14 at 16:45
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    @user2397162 That's fine; you won't disrupt anyone by leaving them be as you read through the guidelines. Every time you edit, they'll be bumped back to the top of the front page to give people a chance to reevaluate your fixed-up question. Only delete them if they're unsalvageable. – AstroCB Dec 28 '14 at 16:46
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    I pulled out of a question ban on MSE after having like 3 LQ questions. – bjb568 Dec 28 '14 at 20:36
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    @niceman don't delete all your questions, that has a negative effect on your account's status. See here: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/267929/… – Michael McGriff Dec 30 '14 at 20:35
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Though this question has already been answered, I would like to share personal experience. Since the OP is more or less in the same reputation bracket as myself, hopefully he will find the points in this answer relatable.

My previous account was question banned because I had numerous low-quality questions (i.e. downvoted, closed, duplicate, etc.). This was during the time I was first learning Java (and learning how to use Stack Overflow). Fixing my posts unfortunately did not lift the ban, so I went and contacted a moderator to just delete my account, which they kindly did.

I believe it was a month or two before I signed up again with a new email. As I have learned more about Java from the last time I was on Stack Overflow, I began to ask better questions and became more acquainted with the site's workings and etiquette.

To prevent your questions from being received poorly, I have found the following to be helpful:

  • Link related questions to your post. Stackers like effort, this shows you have done your preliminary search.
  • Tell specifically why the solution in the linked thread did not work for you. This prevents your post from being marked [duplicate].
  • Be concise and precise. Stackers are more likely to take pleasure in helping if you if you have a well-formatted post that only includes the necessary information (post code snippets instead of entire classes wherever possible) and a precise question.

To answer your question (somehow), I for one, am not a "high-rep" user. Though I needed a new account to start over, what I can tell you is this account is doing much better and gaining more +reps than the previous account ever did by doing the things above.

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