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This is probably one of the most brutal queries to write (since I as a mere mortal don't have access to two missing variables), and point(s) I wish to make related to this rely on a high degree of accuracy, so I appeal to those who have this knowledge.

What are some statistics around users who have and maintain a positive question record? Specifically, I'm interested in:

  • Rough time of day (aligned UTC) that they post questions
  • Break out by reputation (2-100, 101-500, 501-1000)
  • What percentage of active question askers they are
  • What percentages of questions they account for at specific times of day (aligned UTC)

Motives:

  • I'm looking to do a correlation between the amount of questions we receive per day and the number of users who are considered to have a positive question record. My hypothesis is simple: if any sort of (additional/yet another) rate limiting "feature" could have a snowball's chance in Hell at passing muster anywhere, we could look at and permit the people who have demonstrated in the past that they can actually write good and concise questions, and have a track record of doing so to be exempt from any blocks.

  • Seeing what impact this data point has actually had on our community - seeing how many users are actually contributing positively - would be a useful metric to see. It'd also be useful to see at what time of day they're doing it in UTC, to see if that can be correlated to the traffic spikes we observe on the site during certain times of day.

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    Don't tell him it's all the work of that one person we hired to write good questions; I think he might be on to us. – Tim Post Mar 12 '18 at 16:39
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    @TimPost do you reckon if you offer to pay 'em more they'll stop creating all those new accounts and posting "do this for me", wall of code, unclear, or just gibberish questions? – Jon Clements Mar 12 '18 at 16:42
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    @JonClements: I'm not convinced enough Bitcoin exists in the world to pay for that... – Makoto Mar 12 '18 at 16:43
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    You hired someone for this, @Tim? I was sure it was a Jon Skeet-built AI – Patrice Mar 12 '18 at 16:43
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    Break out by reputation you mean the reputation they had when they posted the question? What defines a positive question record? – rene Mar 12 '18 at 16:44
  • @rene: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/262814/… – yivi Mar 12 '18 at 16:46
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    @rene, not necessarily. You have to have a positive question record at the time you earn the badge, but you do not have to keep the record to keep the badge. – yivi Mar 12 '18 at 16:50
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    Right - I'm not necessarily interested in the total number of users who would have those badges. I'm interested in the users who have the "positive question record" criterion satisfied. The reputation when they posted the question...that may be tricky but I think that'd be useful to know. @rene – Makoto Mar 12 '18 at 16:53
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    Since the missing information is staff only and the calculation is fairly expensive - it might be prudent to say why you want this? – Jon Clements Mar 12 '18 at 16:55
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    You need SE staff to answer this, SEDE can't tell you how many deleted question a user has. Finding their rep at time of posting isn't doable and if it would, highly inaccurate. I don't recall if the internal SEDE keeps the reputation history. – rene Mar 12 '18 at 16:56
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    @JonClements: I'm looking to do a correlation between the amount of questions we receive per day and the number of users who are considered to have a positive question record. My hypothesis is simple: if any sort of rate limiting "feature" could have a snowball's chance in Hell at passing muster anywhere, we could look at and permit the people who have demonstrated in the past that they can actually write good and concise questions, and have a track record of doing so to be exempt from any blocks. The other mechanical details are in my yet-to-be-actually-written write up. – Makoto Mar 12 '18 at 16:59
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    "new data point" - sorry - what's that referring to? (forgive me if being dumb!) – Jon Clements Mar 12 '18 at 17:04
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    It's interesting that you mention time of day, as I've gotten the subjective impression that SO has "turd hours" that see an above-average number of zero-effort homework dumps and "omg, how do i liek becom a programmer???" questions. It would be great to have some hard statistics. – Columbia says Reinstate Monica Mar 12 '18 at 17:10
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    @RobertColumbia: At a certain rep point you can see site statistics. There's some interesting data in there, and I like yourself also feel some kind of way about specific hours of the day for rough questions. However, bad questions are a dime a dozen. I'm looking to see when the good askers are lurking. – Makoto Mar 12 '18 at 17:15
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    i have a terrible asking record – user400654 Mar 16 '18 at 18:25
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I've been meaning to look back at asking record and whether it's a useful statistic. To be perfectly honest, we concocted it as check to prevent very prolific, but not terribly useful askers from getting badges for asking. It's purposely a high bar to clear since it triple counts negative signal:

(total questions - negative questions - closed - deleted)/total questions

I graphed the total number of users within various asking record bins (left side) and the same thing for users with at least five questions (right side):

Asking record for all users Asking record for users with at least 5 questions

I multiplied the asking records by 100 to make binning easier. You can see noticable spikes at -200, -100, 0 and +100. That's because those are the only scores an asker of just one question can have. By the time an asker has 5 questions, they will likely have a non-integer record. If you click on the images, you can get a full-sized version of either graph. The median user has an asking record of 81 and the average user has 41. Again, the statistic is skewed toward lower scores.

Looking at asking record by reputation is confounded by the fact that upvotes add to reputation and reputation can never drop below 1. So people with < 5 reputation have pretty terrible asking records and everyone else has decent asking records on average:

Asking record by reputation

The dip at 100 is because of users who get the association bonus. It's not that these users are bad at asking. Rather it's because many have asked questions and not been given an upvote to increase their reputation. I cut the graph at 1k reputation because it gets pretty noisy beyond that. But the general trend is for higher reputation users to have better asking records.

Now looking at core of your question. How do asking records vary by hour of the (UTC) day?

Statistics by hour

The maximum question asking rate is at about 1400 UTC when Europe, Africa and the Americas are awake. The other local maximum is at 1000 UTC when Europe, Africa and Asia are awake. I've graphed the count of questions with a positive and negative score to show that those lines follow the trend of the total questions asked line. Finally, I graphed a scaled up version of the asking record for each hour. As you can see, it does not fluctuate as much as the questions lines do. I don't know if the minor movements are statistically significant, but if there were signal, I would have expected it to be more noticable.

Unfortunately, I can't dig deeper today because of database maintenance. I have not yet answered your question which would require me to break out users by whether they have shown the ability to ask well-received questions over time. And this is further complicated by the fact that so many of our questions are asked by people who never ask a second question:

Most people only ever ask one question

This is one of the reasons we are looking at ideas for helping users ask better questions even before they ask. We think there's a lot more we can do to help people ask better questions (or not need to ask after all) right after they press the "Ask Question" button.

  • I await a deeper dive once maintenance has let up, but this information is incredibly insightful thus far. It feels like my initial hypothesis has been debunked, but there is some skew due to the fact that for all of the issues we've had with "low quality questions", a vanishing percentage of those users actually come back to ask again. I'll have to do a deeper trawl when I get in, but this is valuable. Thanks again! – Makoto Mar 16 '18 at 21:05
  • It may be valuable to use local time rather than server time, if geolocation is possible. Breaking out results by region might also give interesting information: are North Americans significantly different in pattern from, say, those in India and Pakistan? – Dewi Morgan Nov 6 '18 at 16:58

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