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This question already has an answer here:

I ran into a user today who answered a question I did the next day with the exact same answer, formatting and everything (minus my description). This made me think that, with him being a new user, he might be doing this fairly often.

Here's a photo of it since it has since been deleted

I checked, and of the 5 or so answers I looked at two more seem to be doing just about the same thing.

I already left a comment, but is it proper to downvote an answer in such a case? While if the answer were by itself it could be useful, posting it after a full answer has been given saying the same thing seems useless/not helpful.

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters discussion Jan 22 '15 at 0:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    @animuson Looking again, there seems to be another – Zach Saucier Oct 19 '14 at 1:08
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    You certainly cannot downvote based on the merit of the content - because it's your content :) – usr Oct 19 '14 at 10:31
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    It's worth pointing out that this tactic is also used by some spammers who would copy good looking answers (or in the rare case, write a well thought out one) while sprinkling in some gratuitous self-promoting links or other garbage. Be sure to flag accordingly as appropriate. – Jeff Mercado Oct 20 '14 at 5:56
  • Sounds very like a clever bot to me. Parse fragments from existing answers, harvest upvotes, then presumably spam the site. – superluminary Oct 20 '14 at 9:21
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    @usr: You evaluate based on the merit of the new material the answer brings. The first answer adds high-quality content, which is useful. Answers regurgitating that via cut+paste are not adding high quality content, so they are useless. – Ben Voigt Oct 20 '14 at 17:40
  • He was trolling you. – frosty Aug 5 '15 at 3:51
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Better is to custom flag for moderator attention - explaining the copying and providing a link to the original. Both copying someone else's answer and posting the same answer repeatedly are not allowed.

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    Yeah, this is plagiarism -- which should be flagged for moderator attention. – hichris123 Oct 19 '14 at 0:19
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    And also downvote, please. – kapa Oct 20 '14 at 9:35
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    How does this answer the question? Is the answer "yes" or "no"? – anatolyg Oct 20 '14 at 9:50
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    All of the above, and also add a comment—both in case this is a user doing something bad because he doesn't know better, and so that other users can see that it's plagiarized and not upvote in sympathy for your downvote. – abarnert Oct 20 '14 at 21:01
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    I've done that before and got the moderator response "declined - And both of them are trivial, which is why they are similar." I've given up flagging stuff, doesn't seem to be any point to doing it. – robertc Oct 21 '14 at 17:45
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This actually happens quite a lot. Downvote, flag and comment so that other users can see it's a stolen answer no matter how good the actual content is.

Sometimes a bad user provides a bad answer, sees a good answer shortly after and copies it. In this case it's really hard to know or prove who wrote the original answer since the timestamp says the bad user was the first to write an answer but we don't know the original content, due to non-tracked edits within the first 5 minutes after posting.

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    I would suggest this is more of a problem for answers posted hours, days or months later. The number of (non-simple) answers stolen within 5 minutes is vary few and far between. – worldofjr Oct 19 '14 at 21:49
  • @worldofjr, it says you are a member for 2 months... Anyway, what I wrote is just an addition to what's already described by others, I agree it doesn't happen as often. – Shomz Oct 19 '14 at 22:06
  • Well, you can see the revisions and note that the post was edited to create a new answer. So long as it wasn't edited within 5 (I think that's the amount) minutes, it will still show the original answer and you can see that it has been plagiarized. – Pokechu22 Oct 20 '14 at 18:11
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    @Pokechu22 That's what the second paragraph is all about. – Shomz Oct 20 '14 at 19:52
  • @Shomz: I'm member for 6 years (since beta) and I've never seen this (plagiat within the edit grace period). It means that it is very rare. @Shog9♦ says "That might happen, but it would require very careful timing and so far it hasn't been observed "in the wild"." -- if you know any instance of it, please, add it in the comments there -- so far there is none. – jfs Oct 21 '14 at 7:22
  • @J.F.Sebastian It has happened to me 4 or 5 times this year only. So far I've always managed to get it my way (flagged answer removed). One of the last times I had to bluff with a screenshot of their original answer I've supposedly taken before they have stolen mine. :) I did get a downvote in the end, but it was worth it because we ended up with one less stolen answer. – Shomz Oct 21 '14 at 7:30
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Downvoting is your choice - feel free to downvote any answer you don't feel adds any benefit to the site.

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I would do all of the things people have suggested here, not just some:

  • Flag for moderator attention. Probably using the custom/other flag, with an explanation that this is plagiarism, and that also points the mod to the other instances you've already done the hard work of finding so the mod won't have to repeat that work.
  • Downvote, because it's not adding any useful information—in fact, if it ends up with more votes than your answer (or getting accepted), and it's the same as your answer but without the explanatory part, it's hiding useful information.
  • Add a polite comment explaining that it's plagiarism. This may be a user who doesn't realize that what he's doing is wrong, and how else is he going to find out? And meanwhile, the comment will discourage other users from upvoting him in sympathy for your downvote.

Obviously all of these are up to you—some people don't like to comment on anything they downvote for fear of being stalked by angry noobs, some people like to reserve downvotes for more specific purposes so they don't dilute the meaning, etc.

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