-25

We get questions with images of code, or images of exceptions.

Can they be community edited?
Yes!

How?
By using any online OCR image to text service.


The suggestion

First I was thinking "Why don't we get a "convert image to text" button when editing a post."

Now I'm thinking if we do have such a feature built in, we can go one step closer to stopping code being posted as images.

How about running an OCR image to text conversion on images uploaded to Stack Overflow and if it detects text there be a warning that states code as images is not accepted on Stack Overflow, would you like to convert the image to text? (a convert button)

Note: This could give users who for whatever reason no longer have access to the source code or exception message and only have the image, the opportunity to convert their image into code.

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  • 1
    Hey Tom, that one was closed for being a duplicate of another which suggests a warning if an image is uploaded and there is no code in the question. Which is different from my suggestion. I do see the similarity to the one you've linked but I find mine different in the sense it suggests offering conversion of the image to text in the event the question asker has only an image for whatever reason. Jul 31 at 5:18
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    Why should we go to such a large effort to convert the image to text when the person who asked could have simply copied and pasted the actual text for significantly less effort?
    – JK.
    Jul 31 at 5:26
  • 3
    But they didn't copy paste the text and it happens. This is reality and we need to change it. Jul 31 at 5:33
  • @JK. i agree but i think some users get images of codes from somewhere else and they do not have access to the code as text so his idea is probably helpful Jul 31 at 5:35
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    @I_love_vegetables if all the user has is an image of code, how are we supposed to help them with that code? If it's so important, it should be the question author that transcribes the code so they are sure it works.
    – VLAZ
    Jul 31 at 5:40
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    "This is reality and we need to change it." I agree it's reality. However we shouldn't do OP's jobs for them. We are volunteers and we deserve some amount of respect for donating our time. Just dumping stuff in the question box and expecting us to donate more time so we put it into shape and then donate even more time to solve the issue and answer it is...let's say a tad disrespectful. Moreover, if we do all the work, why is OP even involved? Me or anybody else could just repost a self-answer.
    – VLAZ
    Jul 31 at 5:43
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    "Now I'm thinking if we do have such a feature built in, we can go one step closer to stopping code being posted as images." I do not see how this gets is anywhere closer, to be honest. If somebody posted a screenshot instead of copying the already available source code then why would they be clicking any buttons to convert it back to text?
    – VLAZ
    Jul 31 at 5:45
  • @I_love_vegetables let me put it another way - just how often do people only have access to an image of code instead of code? Does it really make sense to implement this feature if it's, say, 3 people?
    – VLAZ
    Jul 31 at 5:46
  • @Vlaz yeah it is the question author's responsibility to transcribe it, what im saying is we can help them do that by this feature right? or am i misunderstanding it? Jul 31 at 5:47
  • @vlaz ah yess nvm i get it now, it doesnt make sense to implement a feature for only a few people Jul 31 at 5:48
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    What happens when the OCR makes a mistake and alters the code? Whose fault is that? Yet more wasted effort sorting that out. Posting images of code is rude and abusive, simple as that. Jul 31 at 15:53
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To minimize implementation effort, Stackoverflow could use a client-side ocr library like https://tesseract.projectnaptha.com/.

Some have said it is useless however I think there are some benefits.

  • First, sometimes error messages can't be copied and it must be done manually.
  • Second, for new users who do not understand how the site works it could lead to more error messages in text.
  • The third use I see is that for more complicated user interfaces an image and text could be included to get the best of both worlds.

That said, it may be a lot of implementation effort so I think it is unlikely to ever happen.

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    I want to know why so many people down voted your answer when all you did was provide a solution. Stack overflow is all about solving problems yet we seem to be beating down on any attempts to do so. Jul 31 at 15:27
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This could give users who for whatever reason no longer have access to the source code

How many are those users? Do you have some statistics? Are we talking three people in total or three hundred a day?

This is important because we want features that benefit people. The more people, the better. And trying to get help with code without having the source code seems like something that should happen extremely rarely. How are those users going to try any suggestions or solutions they get?

or exception message

That seems a bit more common than people not having access to their code. However, again, how often does it happen? Are there so many people with just screenshots of error messages without the actual error message?

Presumably these people do have access to the code or application that produced that error message in the first place - are they completely unable to recreate the error condition? Because it seems in many cases we can offer very little help. If the user cannot recreate the error, then how can they confirm it was fixed?

There are some notable ways to only have a picture of a message - if there is no easily copyable version of it. For example, it shows up as an error popup where you cannot copy the message. Those are legitimate cases where a screenshot comes in handy. However, those are also usually rare. At least rearer than a screenshot of a logfile or a console in my experience.

But they didn't copy paste the text and it happens. This is reality and we need to change it.

(from a comment)

Let's talk about reality, then, shall we? From my experience many of the questions that show images of code/errors are not even worth keeping. They are often caused by typos, by extremely small and basic logic errors, very common error messages, or are otherwise often seen duplicates. They simply do not fit into the high quality repository of knowledge that Stack Overflow aims to build. They are "debug this for me" low quality posts that treat Stack Overflow as a personalised help desk.

Let's also talk about another aspect of reality. Again from my observation, many users who post images of code do it to bypass the quality filter. Stack Overflow questions that include code should also have some ratio of plain text to go with it. This is because we want explanation - what the code does, what is expected, what happens instead, what the user has narrowed down the problem to. Yet, plenty of posts are in the form of:

I have problem with this code

enter image description here

There is barely any explanation - maybe a "it doesn't work" (how?) or "can someone help me" or something of the same calibre. In either case, if there is no code, there is no warning to add more explanation. The users either never intended to provide details and just pasted a screenshot, or they pasted the code, got the warning, and pasted a screenshot anyway.

So, to recap, the reality I've observed shows me that we don't really have some need to accept or keep the posts with screenshots of code/errors. Yes, there are some exceptions but doesn't seem to be worth the effort to implement feature to just help them. In most other cases the feature will just lower the quality of questions in general.

I'm open to seeing some data and statistics that show that what I've seen is an outlier and there are just many people who post very high quality questions where the only problem is that they happened to have lost the source code or error message and only have a picture of it.

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