-47

The "follow" feature is fantastic, since it allows you to easily track questions/answers that you are interested on receiving notifications for updates on them.

However, in some cases, I have noticed that there are users who have followed a post not because they're interested in it, but because they are interested in destroying it. So any time there is a new comment or edit, these users always respond immediately with negative feedback, arguing that the issue is moot, that the question should be closed, or that the post should be downvoted/deleted. This derails the conversation and offers no help in developing an appropriate answer.

My proposal is that either the OP of the question, or some (maybe 3) users should be allowed to force-unfollow the user from the post, so that they stop spreading negativity on the issue.

The UI could look like this:

enter image description here

Thoughts?

9
  • 7
    flag any innaproriate behavior, as simple as that. We should not implement a complex feature to fight something we are fighting since too long with other tools Mar 29 at 10:24
  • 8
    What's next after that? Force re-follow when people abuse the force unfollow feature and kick off legitimately interested users from following the post?
    – VLAZ
    Mar 29 at 10:25
  • @TemaniAfif: Flags won't necessarily work, because the user isn't technically breaking any rules. The objective isn't to have him banned, just to stop him from polluting the specific thread.
    – user000001
    Mar 29 at 10:31
  • 5
    I clicked that Force unfollow link a thousand times now. Stop bothering me.
    – rene
    Mar 29 at 10:36
  • 12
    just to stop him from polluting the specific thread. --> well, maybe it's you that simply don't like users to say what they think and give feedback. You see it pollution and we may see it contructive feedback. It's a matter of opinion Mar 29 at 10:42
  • 9
    "This derails the conversation and..." -- Yes, because a conversation is not desired. If it is required to develop an answer, then the question is not clear enough in the first place. Mar 29 at 10:52
  • 2
    Stack already gets labeled as 'elitist', and a lot of new users think (wrongly) that ppl collude to get them off the platform. Letting a number of ppl control THAT means any click can 'force unfollow' anything. Also.... Your proposal only serves to 'unstar' the question? Can the user still go to the question? Is it invisible to them?
    – Patrice
    Mar 29 at 12:34
  • Comment example looks like one from this (meta) site. While it unlikely to change the reception of the feature adding the clarification if a feature is requested for the main or meta site would be useful. (There is really not much point following on the meta for recent posts as it takes quite a while for post to fall of "the latest" page... so one would likely see updates without any special steps) Mar 29 at 19:58
  • 1
    "just to stop him from polluting the specific thread." - What exactly is "polluting" in this context? Comments you simply disagree with? What happens when the user follows the question again after being forced to unfollow the question, mind you, they don't need to actually follow the question to get notifications or follow the question. Mar 29 at 21:44
8

I would say the current flow of comment flagging ("needs moderator intervention" reason) is sufficient for dealing with users you think "followed a post not because they're interested in it, but because they are interested in destroying it". Can't agree more with Temani Afif's comment:

flag any innaproriate behavior, as simple as that. We should not implement a complex feature to fight something we are fighting since too long with other tools – Temani Afif

The diagram at the end of the post should show the decision-making process for comment flagging is clear and has tools to handle all cases (suggestions welcome in case I misunderstood or missed something). There is no need to introduce a system with the potential for being abused to replace what already exists.

Addressing your concern about the flagging system:

Flags won't necessarily work, because the user isn't technically breaking any rules. The objective isn't to have him banned, just to stop him from polluting the specific thread. – user000001

What you described is a good case where a moderator needs to step in, weigh the problem, have a talk with the offending user (or explain to you they don't think this was an abuse) to prevent them from doing this to others (no need for suspension the first time, but a warning might be warranted) and clear out the comments and/or lock the post should they deem this necessary.

By allowing users to "force unfollow" anyone who commented from their posts, we open a vast potential for abuse. Apart from concerns others brought up, editors (I speak from experience here) are often perceived as unwanted intruders by OPs, and the feature will only make their job harder.

or some (maybe 3) users should be allowed to force-unfollow the user

Granted, ensuring peer review reduces the possibility of abuse, but at the same time makes the feature duplicate the comment flagging even more since multiple comment flags from users greatly increase the chances of a moderator to step in.


Flowchart of possible actions to be taken on a comment including ignoring it, flagging, making a post on meta, or emailing the company.
29

No, there shouldn't be.

If the "following" user is not breaking any rules and their behaviour is not otherwise flaggable, what you describe as "interested in destroying it" reads more like "interested in curating the site".

Negative feedback is feedback. A user that follows a post may be doing so because they believe the post is bad to begin with, but are interested in possible improvements to the post.

Comments posted as a response to "follow" notifications are much more likely than not responses to either edits or other comments, or to changes in status in the post. If a user is notified of edits or comments and the post is still bad, what's wrong in giving additional feedback?

If you believe the comments are unnecessarily chatty, flag them as "no longer needed". If you believe the comments are any type of harassment, use a custom flag to explain what's going on to a mod. If it's simply that you disagree with the user and/or the comments, there is nothing to do.

4
  • Commenting once to express a negative opinion is ok. But if every second comment under a question is from the same user, and is also negative, it can be damaging for the post.
    – user000001
    Mar 29 at 10:46
  • 3
    Sorry, I don't follow what you mean. Commenting to reply to changes in a post, either to edits or to other comments, seems a particularly correct use-case of the "follow post" feature.
    – yivi
    Mar 29 at 10:47
  • I don't think that it is necessary to reply to everything, especially when one is not interested in solving the question, only in destroying it.
    – user000001
    Mar 29 at 10:54
  • 17
    No idea what you mean there, sorry. "Destroying" what in many cases we call "curation" here. Closing and/or deletion. Those are necessary tasks for a community curated site. Calling them "destruction" just to make it sound aggressive, targeted or bad does not make curation less necessary. I think I can guess what comments you are referring to, considering the example in your question, but I'm not going in how not applicable this objection is because it's simply orthogonal to the proposal itself.
    – yivi
    Mar 29 at 10:56
6

So any time there is a new comment or edit, these users always respond immediately with negative feedback, arguing that the issue is moot, that the question should be closed, or that the post should be downvoted/deleted. This derails the conversation and offers no help in developing an appropriate answer.

Badgering the post author with reiterated criticism is not an appropriate use of comments. Such a situation should be dealt with by raising a custom flag and explaining the situation to the moderators. Making a force unfollow button available to the OP or to regular users would go against the general principle that sanctioning user behaviour is done by the moderators, rather than by the community at large. See also the considerations in Oleg Valter's answer.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .