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After I answered this question, it was closed as opinion-based. I don't see that, although I can imagine a too-broad reason. It asked "I'm having difficulty visualizing how the code will run. Is there an intuitive way to approach the understanding of this piece of code?" I suppose that could be seen as opinion-based, but it clearly is an attempt to ask how and why the code in question works. I hope that the answer I gave can help a bit.

I'm tempted just to reopen. I don't like having the power to reopen on my own without others' input, but I do feel this was closed in error. However there were three experienced people listed as having closed the question, so I'm afraid I'm missing something. The history shows it was closed earlier as an (incorrect) duplicate then reopened by the same person, so there's a lot going on.

There is one portion here which is full of opinions. The comments on this question (including one of my own) express opinions about the style of code under discussion. But that's not a good reason to close a question, is it?

My answer was an attempt to explain how the code works; it did start with an opinion about the example used to illustrate the function, and it ended with a strong opinion about relative elegance of different styles. But in between was a straightforward attempt to explain how the code works. Moreover, we don't close questions because of opinions in answers, do we?

Should I just go ahead on reopen this one? Should I defer to the wisdom of the three who closed it? Is there any other alternative?

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    The question title "Correct way to visualize this recursion and HOC question" (emphasis mine) might sound primarily opinion-based. – Jeanne Dark Sep 1 at 15:08
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    "I don't like having the power to reopen on my own without others' input," - You do not have that power, it was not closed as a duplicate – Nick Sep 1 at 15:09
  • @JeanneDark: Agreed, I never thought about the title. I still don't think that's enough. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 15:10
  • @Nick. I didn't realize. I will vote to reopen then. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 15:10
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    The single-handed closing/opening of questions with the gold tag badge only applies to duplicate closures, not other kinds (because you're expected to know the canonicals etc. by the time you have a gold tag badge :) ) – Nick Sep 1 at 15:11
  • @Nick, I knew it was because of the gold badge, but I didn't realize that it was limited to dupes. I still don't like it, mostly because it's caught me by surprise several times, but it's less worrisome now that I know this. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 15:12
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    The comments that a question receives is actually a very good barometer for judging whether a question is opinion-based. – Robert Harvey Sep 1 at 15:26
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    It's certainly possible to answer a question asking for an opinion with an answer devoid of opinions... but that doesn't change what the question is asking for. – Kevin B Sep 1 at 15:34
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    In its current phrasing it's opinion-based, since what is "correct" or "intuitive" cannot be objective. This is basically a "how does this code work?" question in disguise, which are off-topic for a different reason – Michael Sep 1 at 15:36
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    It's actually a good question and answer, the intent behind it is proper. Questions where the OP is seeking enlightenment always get bonus points from me. It's just not a very good fit for Stack Overflow's format, I can understand that it was closed. – Gimby Sep 1 at 15:45
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    Naturally, you have to focus on the comments that are on-topic. Irrelevant comments are irrelevant. – Robert Harvey Sep 1 at 16:10
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    It doesn't really matter if a question asks for an opinion, so long as that isn't the only thing involved. In all seriousness, the "opinion based" close reason needs to be removed and replaced with a set of 4 reasons that actually spell out what it is intended to prevent: discussion, debate, argument, or polling. – Travis J Sep 1 at 19:36
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    @KevinB: To me this is the kind of question that is best served by having multiple different answers, precisely for the reasons discussed here: one person's visualization/explanation may not help as well as another one's for any given user. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 20:53
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    @KevinB: But that's precisely what I mean. For some questions, probably a large majority, there can be one definitive answer that will work well for most users. Others, though, are much better served by a variety of them. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 20:55
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    @KevinB: I raised the issue mostly because I thought that this was going to be an interesting question with several good answers that might prevent it from fading into obscurity. I also don't see "the OP has their answer". Did the OP chime back in somewhere? – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 20:57
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OP is asking for the "correct way to visualize code", and an "intuitive way to understand the code".

What is intuitive for OP or for you may not be intuitive for anyone else. Likewise, there is no single "correct" way to visualize how some code works. We can only know for sure if it is intuitive and correct for any given person, in that sense, if that person tells us. That's obviously not feasible for future readers, or potentially even for OP. Thus I voted to close it as an opinion-based question when I came across it in the Close Vote Review Queue.

For what it's worth, I didn't read any of the comments before casting a close vote (I still haven't read them); comments are transient and anything in them that could affect the outcome of the post should be edited into the post (or the post should be edited to address them).

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  • Thank you for this follow-up. I guess that makes sense. Obviously from the votes to my question here, I'm a ways from the sense of the community. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 15:54
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    Well, the OP can indicate that it was correct using the accepted checkmark, which will indicate to other future visitors which visualization helped the most. Can you cite or source any example or guidance stating that a question must be viable for all future readers? I feel like as a community we are getting a little too hung up on the idea that there needs to be value for every person in the future who visits every question, and that is coming at the expense of not having questions get answers. – Travis J Sep 1 at 19:32
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    @TravisJ Answers don't have to be equally useful/viable for all future readers; what i was saying was a general explanation that, in general, future readers can't be guaranteed to find what you said to be intuitive/correct. I used "future readers" interchangeably with "all future readers" or "all [the] future readers" meaning "all" as a group of many, not necessarily every single one. But I can see where it might lead to some confusion; I'll edit the post to remove that word and the ensuing confusion. – TylerH Sep 1 at 20:10
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    However, what isn't feasible for all future readers is for all of them (yes, all, this time) to tell us whether it is viable, which is the only way we can know. We've all (in the general sense again) seen those posts where comment chains start growing over the years of "It's 20xx and this still doesn't work" or "now in 20xx the best way is this"... and it's just noise, for the most part. The point is there's no guarantee even if OP accepts an answer that it will be useful for someone else who is in the exact same scenario with the same exact code, because the determination is POB. – TylerH Sep 1 at 20:13
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    I find the point by TravisJ valid. Different visualizations will be useful to different users. Now.. there's only one, because it's closed. Other Answers would not have made the post into a discussion or debate, so what's the point of closing it? Any one who answers it will use whatever visualization works for them. No different to any other Question where users post a solution that works for them. – Scratte Sep 1 at 20:15
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    @Scratte The point of closing it was because it was phrased in a way that was not objectively answerable. That you are upset only one answer was posted is completely irrelevant. – TylerH Sep 1 at 20:21
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    You missed my point. The answer isn't opinionated. Neither would other answers be. The honing in on particular words as if they are forbidden isn't making Stack Overflow or the internet better. – Scratte Sep 1 at 20:24
  • @TylerH: Would you vote to reopen if the question was edited to remove "the correct way" from the title and "an intuitive way" from the body? Or do you think it's more fundamental? – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 20:27
  • @ScottSauyet If you remove the POB language (probably should be OP's prerogative) and can somehow avoid/remove the vague "how can I visualize this code" request, I might, but others have started that "please explain this code to me" is off-topic as well, so others might not agree/might re-close it for that reason. – TylerH Sep 1 at 20:32
  • @TylerH: Sorry, what does POB stand for here? And no, I wouldn't edit the question for this myself. – Scott Sauyet Sep 1 at 20:41
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    @ScottSauyet It stands for Primarily Opinion-Based. See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/40353/… for an exhaustive list of acronyms used on this site/other Stack Exchange sites. POB used to be the name of the close reason that is now just named "Opinion-based" (which, funnily enough, is more permissive when it comes to what's close-worthy). – TylerH Sep 1 at 20:43
  • I disagree with the point that just because the accepted answer isn't useful to someone else in the same situation then that means this is primarily opinion based. So is the choice to use dependency injection. Does that mean any post which involves dependency injection is opinion based? What if a user was of the impression that DI Containers were just bloat that caused excessive use of reflection to accomplish lazy development, and as a result they decided that anything which was regarding dependency injection was in fact, an opinion based post? – Travis J Sep 2 at 4:40
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    You see, the issue with calling this group of problems "opinion based" is that what it really amounts to is an arbitrary decision of useful at that point. Any situation which is deemed not useful is also subject to closure as "opinion based" under the current rules, which leads to all sorts of problems, and largely contributes to the friction hounding the exchange today. There is absolutely no reason for these types of questions to be closed, and having them open is not hurting the exchange nearly as much as having them closed is causing damage. – Travis J Sep 2 at 4:40

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