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I had asked a question about Limiting types in C#. This indeed is asking a How to implement? question.

The opinion-based flag description reads:

Opinion-based


This question is likely to be answered with opinions rather than facts and citations. It should be updated so it will lead to fact-based answers.

Neither the question I've asked nor any part of it, at least to me, looks like it invites opinion-based answers. I don't see how it was a unanimous decision to close it as opinion-based. Suggestions on how to improve the question are also welcome.

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    Minor point: the banner saying "opinion-based" doesn't mean the votes were unanimously for that reason; you'll get the banner even if 2/3 users used that reason.
    – cigien
    Jul 6 at 16:21
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    The only question I see in that question is "Can anyone help me about how to do this?" There's no clear problem statement on what you need help with. Your Problem section explains more what your goals are, rather than the problem you are actually facing. You don't describe what isn't working about the code you've provided, or the difficulty you're having solving the problem you have, and “Can someone help me?” isn't an actual question.
    – Larnu
    Jul 6 at 16:22
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    The first sentence of your question said "Can anyone recommend a good approach?" when it was closed, which may have lead to the "opinion-based" close reason being used. In its current form at least, it seems like a reasonable "how-to" question.
    – cigien
    Jul 6 at 16:25
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    It does not seem to be an opinion-based question as it can be answered with verifiable facts and not preferences. That said, I agree with cigien above - when closing, folks tend to rely on keywords when making decisions more efficiently, so using phrases like "recommend a good approach?", "any opinions?", "share experiences?" increase your chances of being closed even if at the core your question is the usual "how-to" post. Also, note that there is an ongoing debate about what is considered an acceptable "how-to" question, so this might've contributed to the closure. Voted to reopen. Jul 6 at 17:41
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    I deleted a bunch of comments arguing about what happens if voters choose different close reasons. The canonical Q&A on that subject is here, with details, for those who care. But it is completely irrelevant in this case, as the question mentioned here was closed by all 3 close-voters having chosen "primarily opinion-based" as their close reason. Thus, I think @cigien's theory is the most likely explanation of why the question was closed. Incidentally, there is now another pending close vote (as of 4 hours ago), but this is for "unclear".
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jul 7 at 3:30
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Let me start by saying this question was closed 2.5 months ago, so exact reasoning might be fuzzy for the close voters, and I say that as one of the people who voted to close the question (for reference, in addition to the time that has passed, that's going to be over 2000 close votes ago for me). I can't remember if I ultimately decided to vote to close this as opinion-based or as too broad or as unclear... maybe a moderator can tell for sure and remind me. I voted to close it as opinion-based, per Cody's comment below.

One could argue that changing "what is a good way to do this" to "how do I do this" would remove the opinionated bit, and sometimes I am of the mind to make such changes. In this case, though, I don't think it would have been clear to me that you were asking for how to do it rather than which way would be "best", and editing the question like that might change what the asker is wanting... not to mention there were already multiple answers, which makes editing the 'ask' an even more careful matter.

It's also possible that I missed the questions you asked as code comments in a big block of code ("// how to implement this?") and thought you were asking for the best way to do something you've already done (e.g. "is my implementation good or is there a better one?"). If that was the case, then missing the code comments was on me, but not asking your questions as prose in the question body is on you; I strongly recommend you always make sure to state your question in the body of your post rather than burying it in code comments. While reading code is often necessary to fully understand the problem posed in a question, one should not have to read code to find the actual question itself.

Especially now that someone has edited out the last sentence, the post doesn't even pose a question at all anymore.

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    I think the "Problem" section acts in lieu of an explicitly-stated question. That describes what is being sought, IMHO. Jul 6 at 21:37
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    @AdrianMole I guess I'm old fashioned in that I think a question should ask a question. A problem statement can be useful, but could lead to a number of different questions, each with their own potential answer set. In this case, the problem statement is too broad to address as an answer satisfactorily, in my opinion.
    – TylerH
    Jul 7 at 0:47
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    Since you asked: opinion-based. All 3 original close-voters chose that reason.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jul 7 at 3:30
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    I agree about the part where I wanted help was merely mentioned as a comment in a long code snippet. I've edited it to be more noticeable as part of the question text. This happens often, even when I review posts myself, as Adrian said, where a decision is usually made by the mere presence of certain words that make the question sound opinion based. Sometimes, I tend to use Can anyone recommend a good approach? with the intention of conveying that I'm not looking for an "ugly hack". What's funny is the question now has a whopping 9 downvotes!
    – Amal K
    Jul 7 at 9:03
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    @AmalK Unfortunately that is the Meta effect for you. For the future, I would suggest that "recommend a good approach" phrasing is unnecessary... it should go without saying that you want a good solution to your answer rather than a hack... if someone is giving you a hack for an answer they should know it/give that caveat in the answer... or suffer the consequences when people downvote their answer for being a hack rather than a good approach.
    – TylerH
    Jul 7 at 14:05
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The "Opinion-based" close reason is often misused, as it was (IMHO) in this case1.

There are many thousands of excellent questions on Stack Overflow with multiple answers offering a variety of possible solutions that use very different code. Such answers are not "citations" and, technically-speaking, neither are they "fact-based."

However, I also see many questions, during review, that are opinion-based (like, "Why does C have a do...while loop but not a repeat...until loop?"). It seems, to me, that many reviewers spot certain key words/phrases (like "best way to...") and automatically assume that makes the question (primarily) opinion-based. For example, something like, "What's the best way to determine the 5th-root of a number using only integer arithmetic?" Is that opinion-based, if it elicits multiple answers?

Perhaps the text given for this close reason could be improved, to allow for multiple, different answers that aren't implicitly opinions. Or should we only accept questions that can only possibly have one, unique solution?


1 Just prior to posting this answer, I cast the third reopen vote on the question under discussion. In this case, a 'simple' (but good) edit like that made after the question was raised here on Meta would have saved 3 close votes and 3 reopen votes.

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    "However, I also see many questions, during review, that are opinion-based (like, "Why does C have a do...while loop but not a repeat...until loop?")" I fail how that questions like that are opinion based. It might have been an opinion when the language designers thought about design decisions like that, but now that choice it's hard historical fact. Not saying that those historical questions are necessarily on topic but that's another question.
    – Alex
    Jul 6 at 19:15
  • @Alex OK, perlahps not the best example. But many of the "Why..." questions can only be answered with opinions. That one may be answerable (by a very few individuals) with an actual citation. Jul 6 at 19:17
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    The problem is not having multiple answers (not sure where that came from). It's about the question, and whether it invites answers that are opinions rather than answers that explain themselves with facts and experience. If the question asks "what's the best way to loop over an array?" we have to ask, what do you mean by "best"? If the question asks "what's the fastest, most memory-efficient way to loop over an array?", that's something we can answer with facts and tests with proofs. Jul 6 at 19:27
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    @HereticMonkey Fair point (sort of). But, if the issue is, What do you mean by best?, then that would be a "Needs details or clarity" close vote rather than an "Opinion-based" one. Jul 6 at 19:34
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    ".... Is that opinion-based, if it elicits multiple answers?" - Yes Everyone can have an opinion on a subject on the best way to calculate something with only integer arithmetic. Can anyone recommend a good approach? that was the author's question originally. The author didn't even bother to define "a good approach". Lots of answers could use C# 4.0, which could be considered "good", if it was 2007. The author's originally question was subjective, but multiple different votes, are not shown in the close reason. Jul 6 at 19:35
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    @SecurityHound I can see your point. However, a simple edit would have been better than three close votes, in this particular case. And bear in mind that many users of this site are not native-English speakers, so the subtleties of the language may not be clear to them. Jul 6 at 19:41
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    Either one, IMO, Adrian. I don't see what's wrong with "Primarily opinion based" when that gets to the heart of the reason we're closing the question. "Needs details or clarity" just leaves them twisting in the wind if they don't understand why we close opinion-based questions. Jul 6 at 19:42
  • @AdrianMole - There isn't a language barrier when one asks "what is a good way" to do something. This question wasn't closed due to a language barrier. On a separate note, unless there was a huge chance in the last couple years, questions are still expected to be in English on Stack Overflow Jul 6 at 19:57
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    @SecurityHound Yes, questions are required to be posted in English. However, they are not required to be posted by non native-English speakers, which is what Adrian said. And I agree in general; there are many valid questions that I come across that could be closed based on a strict interpretation of the slight misuse of grammar in the text. Honestly, this is not restricted to non native-English speakers either. I think the point here is to try and salvage the question if at all possible. If removing trigger words leads to an on-topic question, that's a good edit to make.
    – cigien
    Jul 6 at 20:11
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    @Alex "but now that choice it's hard historical fact" so, you have a concrete, unbiased, objective explanation why there isn't a "reapeat..until" loop? Or do you just have guesses? I also encourage you to read what Eric Lippert has to say about the "why" of language design choices here and here.
    – VLAZ
    Jul 6 at 20:17
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    @VLAZ Not for that particular design choice, but in general there are a lot of resources explaining design choices of languages. As an example I've been a bit engaged in questions about Typescript and in their github repo you can find a lot of documentation explicitly about why certain design decision where taken, straight from the language designers themselves.
    – Alex
    Jul 6 at 20:25
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    This wasn't opinion-based. The fact that you can conceive of multiple possible answers does not make a question opinion-based. There are often many different ways to solve a problem. That's why we allow questions to have multiple answers.
    – Cody Gray Mod
    Jul 7 at 3:37
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    IMO, a true opinion-based question would be something like Do I put the braces on the same line or the next in curly-brace languages? where clearly no answer can satisfy the asker and both ways are "acceptable".
    – Amal K
    Jul 7 at 9:13
  • Re: Or should we only accept questions that can only possibly have one, unique solution? – I share your assertion that this close reason is often misused, and I honestly despise the fact that one whiff of "best" in a post, despite anything else, seemingly warrants a CV from some curators. But I don't think this is the right question; "multiple" answers was never the issue here– nearly every programming question can be answered with different approaches. The goal is to limit opinion-heavy threads that lack a good means of measuring answers' usefulness.
    – zcoop98
    Jul 7 at 14:58
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    Also somewhat related: Shog9's answer to "When is a resource request on-topic?". This answer specifically talks about the "resource request" close reason, but the logic around what we're trying to avoid about "opinion-based" answers is still relevant.
    – zcoop98
    Jul 7 at 15:05

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