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One of my questions in Database Administrators Stack Exchange was closed as "off topic" and moved to Stack Overflow. This happened very quickly with no chance to defend the question.

And while the question did have some C# code in it, it really was a SQL Server question. Specifically, how to debug the SQL Server service broker when it wasn't firing events.

The C# code was just a driver and the real answer involved fixing a bad SQL Server permission, something that doesn't belong in Stack Overflow.

Anyways, why don't we have a way to say "Wait, slowdown, this is why it really belongs in X, not Y."?

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    The question, as stated now, is off-topic on DBA because it is a "Why does my code not work?" and the code shows a client-side program. There is no indication in the question that this is a configuration issue and not a programming one. Even if you self-answer the question, it still has to be an on-topic question. – BDL Oct 1 '18 at 8:14
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    For the records: The answer is also not great. It doesn't explain what the problem is (security settings screwed up is too unspecific. Which settings? Why does that influence the events). It does also not explain what exactly has to be done to solve the problem (Again, delete and recreate user without knowing which settings caused the problem is too unspecific). – BDL Oct 1 '18 at 8:16
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    The permissions as a whole were corrupted. Literally just deleting the user and recreating it with exactly the same permissions was what fixed the problem. Yes I know that's not satisfactory, but that's all I got for now. I was hoping a real DBA could shed more light on the issue. – Jonathan Allen Oct 1 '18 at 9:39
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    Anyone who actually knows how service broker works would recognize it as a SQL Server problem. There are lots and lots of ways to screw up the settings in the database. But the point is that the people who have experience with this didn't get a chance to see the question before the people who mindlessly close C# questions got to it. – Jonathan Allen Oct 1 '18 at 9:42
  • Considering that, is the c# code you posted in any way related to your question? – yivi Oct 1 '18 at 9:43
  • Yes, the C# code is the driver for this SQL Server feature. Which I could have explained in the question if given a chance. – Jonathan Allen Oct 1 '18 at 9:44
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    Complaining about "being given time" is a no-starter. You had all the time in the world before actually posting the question. – yivi Oct 1 '18 at 9:46
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    A "it doesn't work" question with only a code-dump as evidence is almost inevitably going to be migrated. Doesn't matter, Google doesn't care what sub-site it lives on. – Hans Passant Oct 1 '18 at 9:54
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    Many of you missed the point of this meta post. This post says the original question is about "How do I debug the SQL Server broker?". Some of you dug up the original question and argue it is a "How do I fix my C# code" question that would be off topic on DBA. It doesn't matter who is right. What matters is that the author wants to know how to challenge a migration (even if the author is ultimately wrong). – Rainbolt Oct 3 '18 at 15:49
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    @yivi Are you seriously proposing that people can everyone can magically predict when someone will want to migrate a question? That they can see the future and use that time to prepare an answer to some objection they haven't heard yet? – Jonathan Allen Oct 4 '18 at 1:19
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    @JonathanAllen The point is that (how SE is supposed to work is) the post is closed, then you clarify the post (fix or explain why it's on-topic), then it's reopened. Similar for migration (unfortunately it doesn't work?) – user202729 Oct 4 '18 at 4:18
  • @JonathanAllen: "That they can see the future and use that time to prepare an answer to some objection they haven't heard yet?" No, but you can look at your question and try to interpret it the way other people will. You're a DBA user with 1100+ rep, so you must have some knowledge of the culture. So you should know if questions that have a blob of code on them will trigger people's "off-topic" response. And if this is the question you're talking about, that is a huge blob of code. – Nicol Bolas Oct 4 '18 at 4:55
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    @yivi That's a silly argument. It's very common to think your answer is obviously on-topic only to discover that other people interpret it a different way. – Clonkex Oct 4 '18 at 5:21
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Well, you have, but it's not a predefined process: you can flag your (migrated) question for moderator attention and ask them to reverse the migration.

Some situations in Stack Exchange just don't occur often enough to warrant a predefined process to handle them (especially given limited development capabilities). In such cases, you can rely on the human exception handlers AKA ♦ moderators.

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    That's a problem because most people have no idea that's an option. – Jonathan Allen Oct 1 '18 at 8:07
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    Another alternative that I'm not even sure if it's a good idea is to vote to close the question and hope the question got closed and the migration is then reversed... – Andrew T. Oct 1 '18 at 8:12
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    it will just be declined so why put them to the trouble, it is a marginal question regardless of site and it screams too localized as well as not reproducible because the root cause is not known. The answer is basically the same as restart eclipse in java and those get closed and deleted pretty rapidly as they should. This question and answer are marginal at best and are not useful to anyone else in the future because of the nature of the problem definition and solution. Why not just vote to delete it here and be done with it? – user177800 Oct 3 '18 at 4:47
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    @JonathanAllen I would say that’s by design; they have too much to do anyway, this way they only get the most pressing cases. If they went advertising what they can do I think we’d need about three times more moderators. – 11684 Oct 3 '18 at 8:45

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