5

I've mentioned this every year for the past few years, both in the feedback as the survey was live and after the survey. The Developer Role section is missing a selection for people involved in process improvement roles. A common response has been that it's for people who write code, but I continue to point out that this is a multi-selection field and there are a number of non-coding roles listed (designers may or may not write code, business analysts in my experience don't tend to write code, product managers often don't write code, marking or sales professionals don't write code). Maybe other roles are missing, too.

I find the number of people who code as a hobby to be extremely high. The text indicates that people who are caretakers, those who exercise daily, and those who spend more time outside are more likely to code as a hobby. I find this unusual. Personally, I've been kicking around some projects, but haven't had the interest to sit down and code after coding at work. I'd really like to know how these people manage to work a full day, do their other activities, and still have time and energy to do coding outside of work.

I found it interesting that engineering managers have about 10.2 years of coding experience. I'd be interested in min/max here. Is it safe to say that after something close to 10 years, people transition to engineering management? Since this is tied to roles, I'd be interested if the role selections were better defined and more complete (see my first paragraph). Especially as someone who is coming closer to 10 years of professional development experience.

I have questions about the degree program section, unfortunately the survey didn't allow for it. I think it would have been interesting to have a couple of free form fields here in addition to checking the type of program - entering the university name and the name of the degree program (two separate fields). I'm also not sure how useful the breakdown is. But I do recognize that this is hard - so many schools have their own names and groupings of departments and ways of organizing specializations versus separate degree programs.

For ways that developers learn on their own, I'm curious if the ~50% of people who said "online developer communities other than Stack Overflow" were indicating any of the other relevant Stack Exchange communities. I think that "Questions & Answers on Stack Overflow", "Questions & Answers on other Stack Exchange communities", and "Online developer communities other than Stack Overflow / the Stack Exchange Network" would all be interesting options. Plus, an easy opportunity to link people to the rest of the network.

I find it somewhat interesting that 8.5% of respondents indicated a mood or emotional disorder and 7.8% indicated an anxiety disorder, with almost 20% of respondents in the US indicating dealing with one or both. I wonder why it's low globally, yet high in the US. It also seems like a good area for improvement within the developer community.

I'd be interested to see connections between the Technology and Society and Ethics questions and education - highest level of education attained, type of education, and undergraduate major. I would suspect that your educational background would have an impact here. I'd also be interested in other aspects of their background - country, age, years of experience. I'd be really interested in the ~40% of people who would write code for an unethical purpose, the over 50% of people who would not always report ethical concerns with code, and the 20% of people who are unsure or don't believe that developers have an obligation to consider ethical implications of their code.

Maybe when the datasets are posted in May, I can dig deeper into some of these questions I have.

  • Interesting thoughts. 8.5% ... indicated a mood or emotional disorder and 7.8% indicated an anxiety disorder... I wonder why it's low globally, yet high in the US very likely because cultural norms around this seem to have shifted especially in the US, it seems like it's increasingly acceptable to be open about it, particularly among younger folks... slowly trickling into the rest of the world. But there's definitely also a lot of pathologization going on, a tendency to label as "disorder" what one used to think of as just tics or weaknesses or character. Not an entirely healthy trend, that – Pekka 웃 Mar 13 '18 at 11:35
  • For ways that developers learn on their own, I'm curious if the ~50% of people who said "online developer communities other than Stack Overflow" were indicating any of the other relevant Stack Exchange communities that sounds like something the next survey should catch! – Pekka 웃 Mar 13 '18 at 11:37
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    @Pekka웃 So many questions should be combined with continent and/or country, age, gender, educational background. I'm honestly surprised they didn't build the appropriate visualizations or visualization tools for diving into the data now. So much to explore, but we either need to wait until the data set is released in a month and a half or hope that the data team does a deeper analysis on some of these. – Thomas Owens Mar 13 '18 at 11:40
  • " do their other activities" -> get time out of this. – CptEric Mar 13 '18 at 12:11

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