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There is a user, who either pretends that they don't understand how an answer is related to a question, or indeed has a sort of a "blind spot" that prevents them from realizing the actual meaning of the question.

Either way, it's not the first time when they make a strange claim that a dupe target I used is "wrong".

Recently they made a very similar claim again. (Update: the post has been deleted by the OP recently, here is the comment):

The last post has been deleted by the OP since, so here is a comment:

@YourCommonSense Look at the following very carefully SELECT count('id') and WHERE 'username'. You didn't choose the right duplicate, AGAIN. I know you're not going to bother replying here, but maybe if I flag this question stating to moderators that you have not chosen the right duplicate for the question as you have many times before. Is that what you're waiting on? Maybe you won't respond to me but am pretty sure you won't have a choice from a moderator. Next time; choose the right one(s).

I find their comment counter-productive in many ways:

  • first, one cannot claim that the dupe target is "wrong" only because there are other issues in the question
  • second, I believe that to address the error message is much more important as it makes the question relevant, while addressing a typo is hardly useful for the site visitors
  • nevertheless, the said user has the power to edit the list of dupe targets without the need of forcing other people to do that
  • threats to report me to the mods are off the track

I believe, that partly such an attitude is caused by the said user's preferred answering mode: they prefer to pick a question with a lot of typos / transition errors and write a long and ranty answer picking on the every small issue. So their idea is that such a question should be answered with a lengthy review. However, in my understanding such an answer would be off topic on Stack Overflow. Therefore, a question with many issues should be closed as either off topic, or - if its core part is a duplicate - as such.

So the question is: how to explain that an answer on Stack Overflow should address only one issue? And if such an issue has been already answered that a question should be closed as a duplicate?

This question is written partially because I believe that such matters are on topic on the Meta site. Initially I wrote a comment to answer right there, but then realized that such a discussion on Stack Overflow would be a complete off topic. So I deleted it and went here.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Funk Forty Niner, Jay Blanchard, Robert Longson, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName Apr 2 '18 at 18:32

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Independently of this probably being a lost cause, it is a bit sad seeing something like this being answered by a couple of very high rep users. And the user you are pointing the finger at even reopened the question directly... :( – yivi Mar 13 '18 at 11:34
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    @ErikvonAsmuth you are right. Probably, suggestions I proposed are off the track as well. I will try to refine the question – Your Common Sense Mar 13 '18 at 11:48
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    Honestly YCS, based on what I have seen you really have no desire to educate this user. I have seen them ask you questions on numerous occasions and you choose to ignore the questions, providing no response at all. If you really wanted to educate you would join a discussion. – Jay Blanchard Mar 13 '18 at 13:23
  • @JayBlanchard the comments is not the place for any discussions, including education of any sort. That's why I posted here. – Your Common Sense Mar 13 '18 at 14:12
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    Honestly, based on what I'm seeing between you and the other user, what you need to do is both of you sit down with a mod/CM and talk things through, until you both get to the point where you can interact with each other nicely. I'm highly doubtful that bringing this up on Meta will lead to anything beneficial. – Andrew Myers Mar 13 '18 at 14:13
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    @AndrewMyers except that's not what mods/CMs do. Meta is the place to bring these issues up for discussion; as long as you're willing to admit that you may be in the wrong yourself. And there moderators or stack overflow employees may decide to chime in too, as regular users without special privileges or responsibilities. – Gimby Mar 13 '18 at 14:25
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    Then you should invite the user here for that discussion @YourCommonSense or get together in a chat. At least respond saying, "I don't think we should hammer this out in comments, let's go to chat." As smart as you are it seems you would have thought of that. It seems disingenuous to say, "comments is not the place for education" when we use comments to educate all of the time, even when the comment/education has nothing to do with the OP's original question. – Jay Blanchard Mar 13 '18 at 15:47
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    Considering stuff like this, I can understand while YCS might feel that "taking it to chat" wouldn't be very productive. Still, nothing wrong in pinging Funk Forty Niner so they can have their say in this meta question. – yivi Mar 13 '18 at 18:20
  • Geez @yivi, you had to dig for that conversation which is a couple of years old. But you're right - someone else had to point out the Meta question in comments on the question in question as the OP here, despite his claims, never invited the other party to an educational discussion. – Jay Blanchard Mar 13 '18 at 20:41

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