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SO, I think we need to talk. You became dogmatic.

This reflection stems from this question onhold/closed: What is the best practice for breaking up a single python script into modules?

However I have been thinking about that for some time. I feel that SO has become too dogmatic in closing/putting on hold anything that isn't clearly objective. This question to me is a decent example. I'm not thinking it's a great question, but I think it could have value. It's ultimately may partly depend on the quality of the answers given, yet within about 5 minutes it got the 5 votes it needed to be put on hold and it will probably be closed. So it won't get a chance to get attention, and will just fall by the wayside.

Then if I decide to upvote it and comment to express that point of view, of course I'm being told not to upvote and not to comment. Hence the prevalent point of view ends up being reinforce by a handful of power-users and there doesn't seem to be much of a way to provide a counter-weight when it is warranted.

While I understand the guidelines on this and agree they have a value, can we at least accept that judging whether a question is too subjective or not IS in itself a judgement call? Are we sure that we have a (still) balanced approach to that question?

EDIT:

Fine. I agree with the comments below that I posted this harshly and too quickly, without enough research and without taking the time to formulate properly what I want to get at. And it's true, reading back, that the formulation probably makes it a bit too adversarial to be productive.

I still think there is a discussion to be had, but I have to admit at this point that either it'll be for someone else to formulate it, or myself when I have motivated enough to structure it properly.

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    ultimately may partly depend on the quality of the answers given: that's the point though. Those answers are going to be subjective, and based on opinions. And there are way too many ways you could approach the question. You may get one or two good answers, but they'll be followed by 30 crap answers, over time, all trying to show their unique approach to the subject. – Martijn Pieters Feb 14 '18 at 22:22
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    And yes, sometimes a question can be on the border. It still takes 5 community members before a post is closed however, and it can still be edited and reopened. Closing a post is not the end of the line. But you have not picked one of those borderline questions. That one is firmly too broad and opinion based, and it should definitely have been closed. – Martijn Pieters Feb 14 '18 at 22:24
  • I find it interesting that this gets instantly downvoted, as I suspected it would. Does this mean that asking the question/bringing the discussion (on meta) is in itself frowned upon on SO? Hence my comment - SO has become dogmatic and I think this is, overall a bad thing. – logicOnAbstractions Feb 14 '18 at 22:25
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    @Francky_V It means that you've done a very poor job of bringing this to meta. You haven't done your research, you haven't written a clear proposal, you haven't demonstrated why your proposal is beneficial, etc. You've just said that you don't like a well established policy with a history of improving content and that it should be changed (without saying how) based purely on your word that changing it would be better. That's just a bad meta question. Making baseless accusations about dogmatism only makes your question that much easier to dismiss. – Servy Feb 14 '18 at 22:30
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    The humility in the opening sentence tho. – arg20 Feb 14 '18 at 22:31
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    What you seem to be missing is that SO does not exist for all questions that have value. "I'm 3 months pregnant after a ONS. What should I do?" is a valuable question that needs to be discussed, but it is off-topic on SO. And "it could have value" just isn't good enough for SO. If you want Q&A where the questions must be clear with an expert answer and everything else gets closed then SO is the place. If you value any question regardless of form try reddit. – nwp Feb 14 '18 at 22:35
  • @nwp I'm pretty sure a ONS doesn't require such an opening sentence. Otherwise, it wouldn't be a ONS. – Mysticial Feb 14 '18 at 22:38
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    It's not even a single question, it's a multi-parter, with many of the parts being broad and vague at that. Nothing over-zealous about closing that question. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 14 '18 at 22:44
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    Grrrrrrrrrrrowl – Martin James Feb 14 '18 at 23:15
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    @HansPassant: While the idea of getting rid of "hopeless forum chatter" has been there since day 1, realizing what kinds of questions create it and which ones don't has not. Recognizing and expunging subjective questions has not always been what SO has done. Though really, that had already come about by 2011, so his "became dogmatic" thing is still at least 7 years out-of-date. – Nicol Bolas Feb 15 '18 at 3:04
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    @HansPassant Nicol is right, this isn't a founding principle of SO, rather it's something that came about very quickly after it launched. In fact, you can even look at Joel's announcement of SO and see that one of his big exaple questions of what he was thinking the site would be used for is a textbook subjective question. The idea of not allowing subjective questions though took a mere months after the site's founding to be determined to not fit well with the site's format. – Servy Feb 15 '18 at 14:10
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Then if I decide to upvote it and comment to express that point of view, of course I'm being told not to upvote and not to comment.

That's correct, you shouldn't upvote posts that you don't think are useful Since you said, "I'm not thinking it's a great question" you shouldn't vote in a way that contradicts your own opinion of the quality of the post, just because you want to push some kind of agenda.

The user was also quite right to point out that if you want to have a meta discussion over whether or not subjective questions should be allowed, that belongs on meta, not in the comments of some random subjective question you found.

there doesn't seem to be much of a way to provide a counter-weight when it is warranted

Sure there is. If you want to change the policy, you merely need to post on meta explaining why the policy is bad, how you think it would be changed, and why that change would be beneficial. Of course, you haven't done any of those things, which is why this meta post isn't going to result in any changes.

Also, for the record, when posting such a request it's important to do your research into past discussions and ensure that your proposal hasn't been raised before, or if it has, that you're addressing all of the concerns brought up in earlier discussions, otherwise you're just wasting everyone's time repeating it. You haven't done this either. There are lots of discussions on subjective questions here, and why highly subjective questions aren't allowed. You should familiarize yourself with these past discussions before writing yet another proposal that we remove this policy.

While I understand the guidelines on this and agree they have a value, can we at least accept that judging whether a question is too subjective or not IS in itself a judgement call?

Of course it is. No one said it wasn't. Of course you are the one who said that the question is subjective. You aren't arguing that the question isn't subjective, you're arguing that we should allow it even though it is subjective.

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I'm going to remark to this line here, probably because it resonates with me a bit:

While I understand the guidelines on this and agree they have a value, can we at least accept that judging whether a question is too subjective or not IS in itself a judgement call? Are we sure that we have a (still) balanced approach to that question?

I randomly came across that Python question earlier and immediately felt that it was going to start up an opinionated discussion. The fact that the OP mentioned "best" and also decided to ask three questions for the price of one practically sealed this question's fate.

There's been some finer gray line stuff before here, but what I saw was as clear as day: there is no way that you can get a single, subjective answer for three questions.

Is it balanced? In some cases, the mob gets it wrong. This is why we can vote to reopen questions (with the right privilege). This is why we can voice our opinions on Meta Stack Overflow so that the rest of us get s chance to pass judgment on this. I'd argue that it is balanced, given that we have routes to ameliorate true errors.

However.

This wasn't an error.

This question needs to be closed. It's asking entirely too much.

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This reflection stems from this question onhold/closed: What is the best practice for breaking up a single python script into modules?

The notion of "best practice" is inherently subjective. Fortunately, it is often possible to reformulate "What is the best practice for doing X?" into "How to achieve X given this Y requirement?". Difficulties in identifying Y suggest the question is too broad, which seems to be the case here.

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