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I see several users on Stack Overflow answering questions very quickly, and sometimes also very badly.

In one example, the answers are generally quasi code-only, and not very precise. I already tried to comment for asking this user to improve/explain his answers, but I never had a response. Anyway, when they notice they get voted down, they remove their answer.

In my opinion, it is a bit easy to be able to answer badly and delete only when the answer is badly received (downvoted), and I do not think this is what the site endorses.

The problem is that his strategy pays off: sometimes the answers are badly perceived and immediately deleted, sometimes they solve (or partially) the problem and receive free upvotes.

I'm here asking for advice. How should I react against this type of user?

I already downvote bad answers (and it is a reputation-suicide given the number of responses), but I think the problem is more about the user mentality than his answers.

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    Anyway, when he notices he has downvotes, he removes. I call that success. We only need moar people to down vote... – rene Mar 9 '17 at 8:46
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    It looks like you're asking for targeting a user which is for several reasons not something we should do, despite the crap they bring in. Don't forget to address the questions that attract low quality stuff. – rene Mar 9 '17 at 8:49
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    I could post a fast answer, but I know this topic has been discussed at meta multiple times, so I won't. Otherwise typical for the kind of question that attracts fast answers, no research, so answerers tend to not put much effort into it either. – Hans Passant Mar 9 '17 at 8:49
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    @rene That is not my intent. My question is intended to be more general. Should I edit to remove link to the user I took as an example? – Mistalis Mar 9 '17 at 8:56
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    I leave that to you. Without a link it becomes a bit of a theoretical exercise. To balance you could add more examples from different users if you really want to make a point. – rene Mar 9 '17 at 9:08
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    "In my opinion, it is a bit easy to be able to answer badly and delete only when the answer is badly received (downvoted), and I do not think this is what the site endorses." - well eventually it may lead to an answer ban if the downvotes come frequently enough. Just deleting the answer does not hide the evidence - quite the contrary in my understanding, it may work against you. That just strengthens the fact that downvoting is key. – Gimby Mar 9 '17 at 10:28
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    @Gimby Sometimes, I feel like they pass between the cracks... :( – Mistalis Mar 9 '17 at 10:30
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    related: It’s time to retire the term “rep-whore” – gnat Mar 9 '17 at 11:04
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    You cry in a corner after you realize there is nothing you can do about it. Then you decide to let it go and answer questions for fun instead of rep. – nwp Mar 9 '17 at 11:13
  • @Mistalis thanks for making me popular again :) btw show me a post where you have asked me to improve answer – Sajeetharan Mar 9 '17 at 12:06
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    @Sajeetharan How can he show you such a post? You have allegedly deleted them. – DavidPostill Mar 9 '17 at 21:55
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    @Sajeetharan - "thanks for making me popular again" - If this isn't the first time, have you thought that it might be a good idea to try and improve your answers to explain what issue they attempt to fix? – Sayse Mar 10 '17 at 10:04
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    I'll tell you another side affect of this. It turns people like myself away from answering some questions. I have limited time, so to make the most efficient use of my time I prioritise questions without an answer. Why? Some questions that already have an answer have good answers. Although others, as you've pointed out, are bad answers. The only one's I'm sure won't have bad answers are, as you've guessed, the ones with no answers. So I pick these ones out and see if I can help. Then I go about fixing my own buggy code. For this reason I think it is a problem that really needs to be fixed. – Conor Gallagher Mar 10 '17 at 14:37
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    It is not ok to start a witch processes directed to individual users on Meta. You can write this question without naming the user, and you can copy/paste examples from their posts without linking to them. Overall, it gives me the impression that you are stalking this user, no matter your intentions. This is disrespectful and much worse behavior than any form of rep-hunting. You are not a diamond moderator and there's a reason why the real diamond mods don't broadcast all their actions against SO users on the internet. This is not the place to rally lynch mobs. – Lundin Mar 10 '17 at 15:04
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    Isn't this virtual democracy? Not saying that you are wrong in highlighting this issue but SO is based on liberal democratic views. I have seen bad/incorrect answers get more votes than good ones. Votes are opinions and answers are evaluated based on opinion rather than quality (i.e. voters up or down could be wrong). A lot of posters abuse this system but that is by design IMHO – Imran Saeed Mar 10 '17 at 17:54
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Your decision should be based on the post itself, regardless of when and how fast it was posted.

If you see a low quality answer, downvote it and try to explain why you took this action. Hopefully the OP will improve their future posts.

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    This stance is extremely naive, if not harmful. Bad apples must be removed. Comments can (and will) be ignored, and it takes five downvotes to cancel a single upvote. If a user routinely posts bad answers and/or questions, they must receive a formal warning. Flag for moderator attention. – CodeCaster Mar 10 '17 at 12:28
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    @CodeCaster A mod flag for this is likely to be declined. With "Flags are not to be used for technical inaccuracies". – S.L. Barth - Reinstate Monica Mar 10 '17 at 14:38
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    @S.L.Barth that depends on the flag's contents, of course. You have to describe the user's behavior, not the problems of the single post you're flagging. I have hardly ever had a mod flag declined when flagging users who consistently show bad questions and/or answers. – CodeCaster Mar 10 '17 at 15:40
  • @CodeCaster My point is that an action, which can be also flagging the post, should be taken regardless of the time of the post. – Maroun Mar 10 '17 at 15:42
  • @Maroun the question here is about a user who jumps out at being consistenly bad. Your response is to base your decisions on just the post itself and try to explain why you downvote, where the OP here already said they've tried that plenty of times, and points out that the problem is the user, and them not changing their behavior, not the post. – CodeCaster Mar 10 '17 at 15:46
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    If a user consistently posts answers that get downvoted, @CodeCaster, they will ultimately be blocked from posting any more. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 11 '17 at 20:54
  • @Lightness and if some of their posts get upvoted because they're not considered bad, they won't receive any signal they're not behaving as they should. – CodeCaster Mar 11 '17 at 22:47
  • @CodeCaster: If some of their posts get upvoted because they're not considered bad, then they are behaving as they should. – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 12 '17 at 1:23
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit that's not entirely true. I've seen some really bad answers receive up votes. If the user is slinging mud to see what sticks chances are even his upvoted answers are a net-loss to the community due to the lack of quality. My point is that an upvote is not inherently beneficial to the community. I personally think downvotes on deleted posts should still count against you. – Dan Beaulieu Mar 12 '17 at 2:47
  • @Lightness do you believe the user we're talking about in this question is behaving as a model answerer? – CodeCaster Mar 12 '17 at 7:51
  • @DanBeaulieu: They do, don't they? – Lightness Races with Monica Mar 12 '17 at 13:12
  • From my recollection, when you delete a downvoted post your down votes are no longer counted. I recall doing this a few times when I was brand new and being surprised that I got my points back after my post was deleted. Perhaps things have changed since then? – Dan Beaulieu Mar 12 '17 at 13:14
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Most answers and comments seem to ignore this part from the OP: downvoting a user like this is reputation suicide.

A user can post bad answers rapidly, gain points for them, while downvoting them only costs. The game is heavily in favor of the fast answerer, and set against those who wish to maintain quality.

An alternative strategy is to look for better answers on the same questions, and upvote those; hopefully helping those rise above the allegedly bad answer(s).

If you're going to comment on answers that you believe are bad, wrong and/or sloppy - remember that honey catches more flies than vinegar does. Phrase the comment as a suggestion to improve the answer. Come back later and see if they've taken the comment to heart. Then you can upvote or downvote as you believe is appropriate.

Aside from this, try not to focus on specific users. It'll just give you annoyance and confirmation bias. If a user posts a lot of bad answers that you downvote all... you might even be hit by the serial voting detection script.

There will always be users who try to game the system by posting answers as fast as they can, without regard for quality. Instead of trying to fight users or behaviors, focus on the actual answers. Upvote what's good, downvote what's bad, suggest improvements for what can be improved. And if they don't want to listen to your suggestions for improvement - that's their decision. You've done what you believed necessary, now move on.

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    There is a problem with your suggestion. For some reason I feel extremely reluctant against improvement of a blatantly wrong answer. I feel it's unjust to encourage those people by making their answers better. May be I am too oldschool and not too used to millennial ways but I believe that either you know what you're talking about or just remain silent. – Your Common Sense Mar 10 '17 at 11:23
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    @YourCommonSense The blatantly wrong deserves a downvote. But as you've often pointed out, fighting all the bad posts on SO is a lost battle. So I've moved to a different strategy - see what is at least moderately good and see if you can help make that better. I myself have benefitted from people pointing out mistakes and misconceptions in my answers. – S.L. Barth - Reinstate Monica Mar 10 '17 at 11:34
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You seldom get a concrete answer on Meta, so here goes one: There is nothing you can do.

Those few who care about quality here, end up realizing that Stack Overflow is about anything but quality. Stack Overflow is about gamification, having fun, providing answers, servility toward opening posters' whims, greed for the virtual reputation points and badges - everything is welcomed but quality. Ochlocracy, that is offered to you as a palliative for the quality control mechanism, by no means can be used to. So as long as someone is having fun writing guesswork / quick-and-dirty answers, it's OK from the rules' point of view and you can't do anything here.

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    In many (but not all) cases a lack of interested in quality happens despite the rule's point of view, rather than because of the rule's point of view. Not that that's really any better. – Servy Mar 10 '17 at 18:21
  • "Ochlocracy, or mob rule, is often incorrectly equated with tyranny of the majority; however, ochlocracy involves illegal action and does not necessitate a majority". Are you suggesting you have to break the rules in order to maintain the order? – John Dvorak Mar 11 '17 at 22:17
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SO is a site that heavily relies on gamification to achieve its goals. So unless explicitly prohibited any strategy that brings positive reputation gain is valid and "welcome"*.

The strategy you described is used by many high-rep users. When Jon Skeet is not awaiting he provides answers insanely quick - granted such "quick and dirty" answers are way above most other posts on SO but it is the same strategy. Sometimes better action would be to close post as duplicate - but closing posts does not bring any reputation rewards (at best) and hence can be considered not-so-welcome strategy.

If your main concern that user does not want to reply or change they behavior - this is perfectly normal human behavior. Most people don't want to change and never will.

Overall the best option is to vote on quality of the post and add such users to "don't even try to talk to" list.


* whether community actually welcomes such strategies is totally different question - this answer is not concerned about it.

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If the answer is bad then you should downvote it and put an explanation in comments. So that they can learn from their mistakes. But the problem with downvotes with comments is if you put a comment some users will take it personally and try to take revenge and downvote your answers on other post.

So it all depends on user to user. We can just put a downvote or comment both on low quality answer.

  • lol.. someone doesn't like this answer and downvoted without comment. @downvoter I won't downvote you if you disagree with this, just post a reason in comments. If I agree with you I will delete this answer. – Atul Mar 12 '17 at 17:10

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