29

Basically the title. If a user gets gold on a certain tag, let's say, , shouldn't they be able to close questions? Python 3 and 2 aren't extremely different, and if the user has a gold in one version of the language, doesn't mean the other version is completely different. The only exceptions I've heard of to this, is R, where a couple versions are different by a large margin.

But why is this the case?

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    The question needs to be tagged (by someone else) with such a tag x, any x, prior to the dupe vote by the gold in x. Usually the gold would have it in python prior to any of the versions anyway. The problems arise when Questions are tagged wrong. – Drew Oct 4 '16 at 2:32
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    This is another perfect example of the need to relax the rule that you can't dup-hammer a question when you added the tag yourself. It is often the case that the OP tags the question incorrectly, which is especially likely with these version tags. So the user tags a question only with css3, even though it should be just be tagged css, and then a css gold-badger can't hammer it. – user663031 Oct 4 '16 at 3:33
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    @torazaburo That would just be another band-aid fix for the actual problem: the missing link between non-versioned and versioned tags. – user247702 Oct 4 '16 at 10:00
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    @Stijn I agree, of course, yet in practical terms removing the current rule could be done in about five minutes, while implementing some system of versioned tags will take who knows how long if ever. – user663031 Oct 4 '16 at 10:52
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    Theoretically, an expert in [python-2.7] could not know anything about [python-3.x]. Theoretically. It is a pretty strange theory but lots of [python] programmers appear to subscribe to it so it must be true :) – Hans Passant Oct 4 '16 at 12:22
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    @HansPassant This is a bit of a red herring. We are not talking about someone with a 2.7 badge arbitrarily hammering a question about 3.x features they know nothing about. We are talking about a question which should have been tagged python instead of just python2.7 (or javascript instead of just typescript or ecmascript-6), where the mistagging prevents the python export from using their hammer. – user663031 Oct 4 '16 at 12:57
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    Sad story here meta.stackoverflow.com/q/272475/4099593 – Bhargav Rao Oct 4 '16 at 14:18
  • @BhargavRao except that's not how it works now – Liam Oct 4 '16 at 14:35
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    @torazaburo isn't easier and more scalable to just have one tag to rule them all and specify the version on the question body instead (in case it's relevant)? – Braiam Oct 4 '16 at 14:36
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    Wouldn't a user who has a gold badge on one tag naturally be really close to getting the gold badge for related tags anyway? For example, my tag scores for ruby-on-rails, ruby-on-rails-3, and ruby-on-rails-4 are pretty close to each other. If I were to get a gold badge in ruby-on-rails, the other tags would soon follow. – Ajedi32 Oct 4 '16 at 14:39
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    I wonder if we could use Docs to rework this. Since all versions of a language should point to the same docs that the main tag points to then if you have a gold tag in the main tag then we trust you to hammer those questions as well. No sure how much complexity it is but it is just a thought. – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Oct 4 '16 at 14:44
  • @Ajedi32 depends on the tagging behavior of the ones asking questions. I checked the top users of all of them, and the composition isn't homogeneous. In the case of ror4, the top 5 isn't in the top 10 of the plain ruby on rails nor it's 3rd version tags. – Braiam Oct 4 '16 at 14:47
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    @Manoj Kumar: Why would you want to let anyone hammer that question (or any question they like for that matter) with a single vote? – BoltClock Oct 4 '16 at 16:05
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    @Drew Ruby's not quite the same as ruby-on-rails-3 though. While it's true that Rails is probably the most common usage of Ruby, it's entirely possible to be familiar with Ruby while never touching Rails. A better comparison would be ruby-on-rails-3 and ruby-on-rails-4. – Ajedi32 Oct 4 '16 at 17:31
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    @Ajedi32 Wouldn't a user who has a gold badge on one tag naturally be really close to getting the gold badge for related tags anyway? No. I'm at 2K on JS but only a few hundred on ecmascript-6. So I cannot hammer a question marked ecmascript-6 but not javascript even if it is a pure javascript question. This happens with some regularity. – user663031 Oct 4 '16 at 18:53
43

The goal of the Mjölnir is not to be perfect, but to be better than what was there before.

If 1 in 20 things that could be Mjölnir cannot be because someone tagged it without there is no significant problem.

The gold badge probably has . If someone else edits the post to add they can use their Mjölnir. They can edit in and let someone else with the python gold badge hammer it.

We are talking about an extremely marginal case, where you require 1 additional person with the Mjölnir to help. A system to solve this would require meta tags that teach SO that the variants of python belong to the same dupehammer family or somesuch. So the choice is, some kind of complex new system, or stay with an existing system that is only 98% efficient (estimated 5% of posts missing , requiring 2 people to close instead of 1, makes it about 100%-5%/2 efficient).

That is a high bar to pass. The 2% remaining issue has to be more important than anything else that would require a new system of similar complexity to justify adding that complex system.

The perfect is the enemy of the good. The Mjölnir system is pretty good; making it perfect would require lots of more work. Finding something else to make good seems like a far better idea than perfecting the Mjölnir.

  • But that doesn't take away that 1) we are already thinking about extending current tag powers towards other moderating tasks, outside duplicates, so having something scalable and simple, that doesn't require hardwiring conditions, triumphs over whatever; 2) it's still annoying. – Braiam Oct 4 '16 at 14:40
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    "where you require 1 additional person with the Mjölnir to help" can't you get a normal user (maybe somebody from the CV rooms) to add the tag and then hammer? I think the bar is even lower than you describe. – ssube Oct 4 '16 at 17:12
  • @ssube it is strictly forbidden from happening in the socvr chat room. Perhaps we need a "Could someone add this Tag" room. – Drew Oct 4 '16 at 17:17
  • @ssube maybe for low-traffic tags, but for any reasonable traffic tag just retag, activate the duplicate vote, and another Mjölnir user will show up shortly and agree with your duplicate vote. But yes, the effort increase is at most 2x and usually less. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 4 '16 at 17:23
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    Weird logic. Since the goal of something is not to be perfect, but to be better than what was there before, and we've already made some improvement, that means we should do nothing else? As I said, weird logic. It's not a marginal case, at least depending on how you define marginal. It's happened to me at least half a dozen times. Then you throw out more red herrings: since we can't make it perfect, it follows that we should do nothing at all. Read up on your logical fallacies. – user663031 Oct 4 '16 at 18:56
  • @torazaburo Once you have 98% solved a problem, justifying a new system to solve the remaining 2% requires that the additional solution be (much cheaper and simpler) or the remaining 2% be (2% of a really bad problem). Neither holds here. The remaining problem isn't large (two hammer people instead of one, with the 2nd hammer user having less work to do!), the solution isn't completely trivial (having to generate a pseudo-synonym or meta-tag system to attach tags to each other and spread the dupehammer's power, either manually, computo-magically, or through community). – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 4 '16 at 19:01
-3

This thread contains more logical fallacies, in answers and comments, than you can shake a stick at.

That would just be another band-aid fix for the actual problem: the missing link between non-versioned and versioned tags.

What's wrong with band-aids? Band-aids can be a perfectly legitimate response to a certain class of problems, in lieu or, or in advance of, some longer-term, more complete solution. Calling something a band-aid is not a valid argument unless you explain specifically what is wrong with the band-aid.

Once you have 98% solved a problem, justifying a new system to solve the remaining 2% requires that the additional solution be (much cheaper and simpler) or the remaining 2% be (2% of a really bad problem).

So we are never going to tweak anything? And let's be clear: this is a tweak, not a "new system". It's just removing the restriction that people cannot hammer based on tags they added. It should be a smallish development project.

Wouldn't a user who has a gold badge on one tag naturally be really close to getting the gold badge for related tags anyway?

No, they wouldn't. I'm sure a query on people holding gold badges in JS vs in "ecmascript-6" would prove this.

The python-2.7 gold badge probably has python

This is the converse of the issue. The question is if someone has python do they have python-2.7.

The perfect is the enemy of the good. The Mjölnir system is pretty good; making it perfect would require lots of more work.

Strawman. No one said make anything perfect. They said to tweak it to make it a bit better.

another Mjölnir user will show up shortly and agree with your duplicate vote.

Define "shortly". The issue is that they are not likely to show up until the question has already been polluted with redundant answers, making it harder to delete, and wasting the time of people who look at it in the interim.

  • I agree with you but you insert one fallacy (#42 or #50, not sure) youself: NOTHING takes five minutes of dev time. (here's hoping you are not in management). From finding where the change should be, to making the change, to committing the change, to running the tests and then to deploy to production, i doubt any of the bolded verbs would take five minutes or less, even less so all together. – Mindwin Oct 6 '16 at 12:35
  • @Mindwin Yes, "five minutes" is an idiom which means a "small T-shirt". – user663031 Oct 6 '16 at 12:54
  • yes, I recognize its an idiom... "when you point a finger at someone, three are pointing at yourself". If you are going to play the I-spot-your-fallacy game, you have to double check your own cards or you weaken your argument. – Mindwin Oct 6 '16 at 13:18
  • @Mindwin Thanks for your kind counsel. I have reworded the part in question. – user663031 Oct 6 '16 at 13:41
  • I'm glad you took that path (of pointing out the fallacies in the discourse). Rigour begets rigour. XD – Mindwin Oct 6 '16 at 14:08
  • Honestly, I expected better after a claim to put fallacies into light than empty open statements like "What's wrong with band-aids". You actually say nothing. Please explain why they're good. Please explain how this semantical difference from perfect to tweak actually changes the matter. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Oct 6 '16 at 15:18
  • @FélixGagnon-Grenier Although you hardly seem inclined to actually listen, "It's a band-aid" is a version of the fallacy involving proclaiming that "SOMETHING IS X!!!" with the unexamined assumption that X is somehow horrible. My response to this says exactly what it means. Band-aids can be a perfectly legitimate response to a certain class of problems, in lieu or, or in advance of, some longer-term, more complete solution. Calling something a band-aid is not is not a valid argument unless you explain specifically what is wrong with the band-aid. – user663031 Oct 6 '16 at 16:46
  • @torazaburo Why don't you add that content in your answer? This is actually what I am asking you. Explaining why the band aid can be ok, relating to the situation at hand, not in some general way. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Oct 6 '16 at 17:22
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Tags are tags, they are used on SO to distinct some versions, but for SE's tag system, the difference between python-2.7 and python-3 is the same with that c++.

The right question is are they worth it ? Do we need really 2.7 tag and 3 ? Are the users following them really differents ? Probably not for that specific case.

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    There are some pretty large differences between these two versions, and so for some questions the answer is "you are using the syntax of the other version" and others can only be answered "for" a certain version. – usr2564301 Oct 4 '16 at 9:00
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    @RadLexus there may be gulf between versions, but the are still the same language. Python doesn't stop being Python between 2.x and 3.x – Braiam Oct 4 '16 at 11:59
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    @Braiam It doesn't stop being python but if someone is limited to 2.x features then they need a way to show that and a tag is a good way to do that. giving them a 3.x solution would not be helpful since they cannot use it. – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Oct 4 '16 at 14:46
  • @NathanOliver how many times a day does it matter? On UL we removed all version tags for all distros (the complete stack can be different) and we haven't look back since... if they ever appear we quickly remove them. Granted, the most popular tags are ~5 questions/day, but we don't create them just because there are different versions for X. They have to prove themselves useful. – Braiam Oct 4 '16 at 14:51
  • Granted, the most popular tags are ~5 questions/day => I suppose the frequency is the same, but the much higher number of occurrences in Python/Java/JavaScript tags may make the problem more prevalent? I am personally not sure that tagging for answering is needed (it can be specified as free-flow information) but for searching it might be useful. – Matthieu M. Oct 4 '16 at 15:06
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    when things like angular and jquery have large swathes of incompatibility between major versions, or worse, become total rewrites, it becomes necessary to differentiate between the two, and as Nathan has already said, tags are the best way to do that. – TylerH Oct 4 '16 at 18:13
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    @TylerH Angular v2 is another framework, not just an upgrade of version. So this doesn't apply – Walfrat Oct 5 '16 at 6:19
  • @Walfrat It's the same framework, it's just a total rewrite. – TylerH Oct 5 '16 at 13:08
  • @TylerH whatever, i agree than in the case of angularJS this can't apply. – Walfrat Oct 5 '16 at 14:19

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