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This question already has an answer here:

I know that this website was founded on the idea where users of a special field (in this case programming) come to ask creative and productive questions. Unlike its other web counterparts (Quora, Yahoo Answers), Stack Exchange does not spoon-feed its users. It makes sure that people have done their homework well before submitting a question.

This website relies on a system that bans a user from asking question when the questions they produce are unworthy (such as those the can be easily searched).

I totally agree and respect that, since it means that this website has a high standard and therefore high-quality contents, and so that it teaches people to do more research before asking.

The problem is I am a new programmer. I encounter a lot of problems of which a lot of those I cannot yet solve, because I am not yet good. I know it may be very easy for several programmers to solve such problem, but again I have yet to develop the skill and experience to solve it.

The problem is most of these programming problems are hard to search for. I've been searching for hours looking for a good solution, but I could not find any. Of course, before I search online, I would try to see if I can do it by myself without the help of the Internet.

Most of the time I am able to solve it, but for some part, I can't. So after I have done my research I would ask Stack Overflow. The problem is, not everyone, but some people would downvote my question, and say I was stupid because I wasn't able to see that one very very tiny error in my code which did not make my code compile.

Rather than leaving it as a complaint, I thought I'd just ask you guys for help. How do I make a better question? I have followed most of the tips here: https://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask, but still I am at the risk of being ban. So how do I formulate better questions?

marked as duplicate by gnat, ArK, Luke, Glorfindel, Infinite Recursion Mar 21 '16 at 10:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    I can only see one downvoted question, but that is umm... 'not good'. There are a LARGE number of posts re. NllPointerException, an error that is very easily sorted by the most minimal attempt at debugging - it should have been obvious that the array entries were all null and calling methods on them would fail badly. That particular problem did not need an SO post and the downvotes on it could have been avoided, as in so many cases, by a sane amount of debugging effort. I can't see any other downvoted questions - did you delete them? – Martin James Mar 21 '16 at 7:34
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    When you ask a question, do you include what you have searched for? You'd be a lot more likely to avoid my downvote if you state exactly what terms you had searched for since that alone shows research effort and may show that you simply are just missing a simple keyword – Sayse Mar 21 '16 at 8:04
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    One common problem of low quality beginner questions is that they do not isolate the problem enough. My advice: debug a bit before you present the problem. By debugging I mean: make a minimal example that runs and shows the error. By minimal I mean: throw out everythng that has nothing to do with the error. Once you have that and present a single, specific problem without much clutter, it has good chances of getting an anwser here. – Trilarion Mar 21 '16 at 9:34
  • Learn how to debug in general and how to use the debugger in the program you develop with. Show your research: be specific about what you looked for and what you tried (while still being concise). If you coded an attempt to fix it, include that. Search SO for the error that you're getting. Always look for duplicates before posting your own question. If existing answers don't help you, link to those questions in your own and explain why none of the existing answers work (not just the accepted answers, all of them). – BSMP Mar 21 '16 at 12:44
  • How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example or MCVE. – BSMP Mar 21 '16 at 12:45
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This website relies on a system that bans a user from asking question when the questions they produce are unworthy (such as those the can be easily searched).

It's a combination of your post scores, the amount of posts, how many deleted (negatively scored) posts you have and general activity. The exact formula is undisclosed.

The problem is I am a new programmer. I encounter a lot of problems of which a lot of those I cannot yet solve because I am not yet good. I know it may be very easy for several programmers to solve such problem, but again I have yet to develop the skill and experience to solve it.

That's not a problem! We have questions and answers to thousands of new programmer problems on this site, so if you have a question, just take your time to use the search feature before asking. If you honestly cannot find the solution to what you've been looking for, take some time to read how to compose a question and do so carefully. In fact, often while composing a question properly you will happen upon the solution!

The problem is most of these programming problems are hard to search for. I've been searching for hours looking for a good solution, but I could not find any. Of course, before I search online, I would try to see if I can do it by myself without the help of the Internet.

Then it's not bad to ask a question here. We don't have an aversion to easy questions, just bad questions. Just make sure you compose your question with all necessary parts, and formulate it well. See how to ask on help for that.

So after I have done my research I would ask Stack Overflow. The problem is, not everyone, but some people would downvote my question, and say I was stupid because I wasn't able to see that one very very tiny error in my code which did not make my code compile.

Part of composing your question properly includes using a debugger and doing some testing to reduce your problem to a minimal complete and verifiable example (MCVE). If your error could be resolved in doing so, then that's an indication that you didn't do your homework properly, and votes will reflect that.

I have followed most of the tips here: https://stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-ask, but still I am at the risk of being ban. So how do I formulate better questions?

Try harder and do more of your own research before asking. The community appreciates well-asked questions, even if they are easy.

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    "We don't have an aversion to easy questions" - we do, those are called duplicates. The only downvoted question by the OP that I could find, was a classical NullPointerException. – CodeCaster Mar 21 '16 at 10:23
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    how many deleted (negatively scored).... not quite. It is how many "poorly received questions (including deleted posts)". There is nothing special about deleted posts that makes them count differently than undeleted ones. – psubsee2003 Mar 21 '16 at 11:20
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    official reference on what @psubsee2003 wrote: Can self-censoring end up with a question ban? "Deleted posts are mostly irrelevant to the question ban. If someone tells you otherwise, tell them they're wrong; if you see a meta post that says otherwise, edit it. What matters are poorly-received posts. ..." – gnat Mar 21 '16 at 15:13
  • thanks @gnat could not find that point this morning. – psubsee2003 Mar 21 '16 at 15:17

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