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I recently came across this famous question: How do I detect a click outside an element?

It has heavy mention that the main answer which is also the accepted one and has heavy upvotes, is just plain wrong, and it even has a dedicated post from an outside source:

https://css-tricks.com/dangers-stopping-event-propagation/

I think this is enough proof that we need to explicitly state that this answer is not correct for this question.

I did my part by downvoting, but that's not enough.

I remember coming across a question 'Java vs JavaScript similar?', which had the top answer 'They're similar as car and carpet are similar.' which had a note that that answer was there because of historical significance and should not be considered as example that similar questions be asked.

Are there any similar arrangements for this case?

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    The caveat is embedded into the answer itself. What more do you want? A blinking red light? – Cody Gray Mar 15 '16 at 6:07
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    @CodyGray Yes, for answers that don't have the embedded caveat... on this or other questions. – cst1992 Mar 15 '16 at 6:14
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    You can abuse 'Electorate' & 'civic Duty' badges for this. When you click on 'Vote' link , these kind of questions will be displayed on top of the list. People simply, upvote whatever coming in the top of the list. – Raju Mar 15 '16 at 6:17
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I think this is enough proof that we need to explicitly state that this answer is not correct for this question. - Yes, you could do that. But there is already a highly voted comment that does that. Also the answer itself has a clearly visible warning in it that goes like this:

Warning, if using this technique, be aware of ....

If a user ignores all these warnings and uses that answer, it is his mistake. If an answer is wrong, then you should drop a comment, down-vote it and hope people will see it. It would be great awesome if you could post the correct answer.

A side note on what not to do - Please don't flag such answers seeking a mod's attention.

Flags should not be used to indicate technical inaccuracies, or an altogether wrong answer

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    What is the guarantee that every answer which is similarly wrong will have a warning or a comment explaining that it's wrong? An answer might not have any of those. If, for example, a question is duplicate, the banner above the question is a better attention-grabber than a comment below it saying it's a duplicate. – cst1992 Mar 15 '16 at 6:33
  • @cst1992 - What is the guarantee that every answer which is similarly wrong will have a warning or a comment explaining that it's wrong? -> If you see that an answer is wrong, then (ideally) you should leave a comment and (perhaps) down vote it. When people look at an answer with down-votes, they will realize that there is some issue with that answer. We strongly recommend leaving a comment (if there isn't one) when downvoting – TheLostMind Mar 15 '16 at 6:40
  • That's exactly what I did, but with 1197 upvotes(counting my downvote), we need a stronger way. It's all coming down to those old questions/answers that are technically wrong but have a massive amount of upvotes, so don't appear to be. – cst1992 Mar 15 '16 at 6:45
  • @cst1992 - Wrong answers and duplicate questions are completely different things. An answer could change slightly and depending on the people looking at it, its state may oscillate between correct, wrong and blatantly wrong. Sometimes the OP chooses to accept a completely wrong answer that (somehow) fixed his problem. The measure of an answer's correctness is usually the number of votes that it gets. If 1197 people think that an answer helped them, I honestly think that there is very little that we could do (other than leaving that comment) – TheLostMind Mar 15 '16 at 6:50
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    Indeed, oscillation is a common problem with answers. – Cody Gray Mar 15 '16 at 7:08
  • If the answers are oscillating, the the question is unstable; it's Q is too high. Given the inevitable phase delay between posts and responses, oscillation is inevitable. – Martin James Mar 15 '16 at 9:32

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