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On this Suggested Edit review page, it looks like the editor improved certain sections, yet degraded another section and added seemingly superfluous text:

"This my piece of code"

"...Thank you :)"

It didn't feel to me that the editor was malicious so I checked the history of the original post and it turned out that there were already other better edits done (and approved) in the meantime while this edit was still in the review queue.

The diff that I was seeing was based on the updated post, not the original post that the editor edited against. This explains why some sections looks like it was improved while others degraded.

It didn't seem to make sense to only show reviewers a diff of a newer version with an older pending edit with no other information:

  • Approving means a partial regression of the post in those sections which were edited since the editor made the suggested edit.
  • Rejecting means losing the original edit which actually improves the post in the sections where he/she made the edit. It also tarnishes the statistics of an editor whose edit was in good faith.

To clarify, the original edit actually only improved the post. The sections that looked like it was degraded by the edit were actually not edited by the editor, but because they were improved upon by others afterwards, it looked like the original edit degraded those sections in addition to its original improvements.

I would expect something like one of the following behaviors which handles this case more explicitly:

  1. Use a 3-way merge to allow the reviewer to handle this situation manually
  2. Auto-merge the edit with the newest version and diff this against the newest version (similar to rebasing). Also give an option for the reviewer to view the original edit in case the auto-merge failed.
  3. Edit Review would be diffed against the original version (instead of the newest version) and there would be a note saying there is a newer version available.
  4. Remove the Suggested Edit from the review queue if it has been sitting there too long and there were already edits done after the editor saw the post.

Finally, how should this situation be handled with the current behavior? I rejected the edit, but was it the right thing to do?

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    "...it doesn't make sense to show reviewers a diff of a newer version with an older pending edit." Actually, I feel like this does make sense, as you're looking at the edit at that point in terms of how it would change the current post. Looking at it from terms of where the editor started editing could be an improvement on the revision they started from- Yet still be a horrible edit to the current version. That's what you want to review- In terms of the current revision of the post, is this edit worthwhile? In this case, it wasn't, so you were right to reject. – Kendra Oct 20 '15 at 15:40
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    At the same time, I think this is an odd edge-case of a scenario. It looks like the two suggested editors started their edits around the same time and the accepted edit was pushed to the queue and very quickly reviewed. By the time the second edit was pushed to the queue, the first one was either already being improved or had already been improved, which made it look like the second editor was undoing a lot of the changes made to the post by the improver of the first edit. – Kendra Oct 20 '15 at 15:44
  • @Kendra I meant that it doesn't make sense in the grand scheme of things, not just for the post itself. That's why I followed up with two outcomes -- specifically this one: "Rejecting means tarnishing the statistics of an editor whose edit was in good faith." By showing the diff of the newest version vs the editor's version, it frames the editor as being malicious when in reality, he/she wasn't. I understand what you mean though and I do agree with you if all that matters is the actual post itself, though I do think it would be better if it auto-merged the changes instead just as in a VCS. – user193130 Oct 20 '15 at 15:55
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    One single rejected edit is not going to hurt an editor. Even one every once in a while isn't going to hurt them. I should know, I've got a few myself. What matters, and the reason the reviews exist, is the quality of the post before and after the edit. The queue isn't to see if editors are making good faith attempts to improve a post, it's to see if they actually are improving the post. Auto-merging the post has the potential to make an even bigger mess. For instance, say two editors reword the same line. (cont.) – Kendra Oct 20 '15 at 16:02
  • (cont.) Which rewording do you use? Both, and have a duplicate line? What if they use two spellings of the same word, British and American? It's too much of a hassle for the devs to implement for this uncommon edge case. Now if this was happening with half the edits made every day, it might be at least worth looking at, along with other options. But this just doesn't happen often enough from what I've seen to really warrant any special handling. – Kendra Oct 20 '15 at 16:03
  • @Kendra Yep a single edit isn't going to hurt but this still feels wrong (like knowingly convicting an innocent person). In cases where there's a conflict, it could always fall back to a 3-way merge or just show one of the versions, but when there isn't a conflict, an auto-merge is pretty useful. I understand that it would be a lot of work for the devs to implement, but it doesn't change the fact that this "edge-case" is probably not being handled optimally and is therefore a bug. – user193130 Oct 20 '15 at 16:17
  • @Kendra (cont.) Taking the edit I came across for example, the editor improved the readability of the code section, but rejecting it means their perfectly good edit was lost because another sections which they DID NOT modify looks as if it was degraded from the view point of a reviewer. I just feel there are better ways to handle this and it should be given more thought. – user193130 Oct 20 '15 at 16:19
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    Last I'm going to say here on this. This is an uncommon edge-case. It doesn't happen often enough for anyone to worry about. It is not worth developer time to "optimize" for, as the system is working as intended in this case, and there is little reason to put a lot of developer time into "fixing" something that just doesn't come up that often. If you can provide evidence that this is a common occurrence and a huge problem, then I can see making an argument that it's worth developer time to fix, but until then, it's just not worth changing this when the system already works as intended. – Kendra Oct 20 '15 at 16:26
  • @Kendra You're right that it's an uncommon case and I'm not going to dispute that. I've removed the emphasis on this being a bug as it may be the devs' intention to forgo handling this case but I do hope that it would be fixed eventually so no one's hard work would be wasted. – user193130 Oct 20 '15 at 16:40
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    @user193130 this isn't a bug and really isn't a discussion. You are in reality proposing a feature to change the behavior of a system that is working as designed. – psubsee2003 Oct 20 '15 at 16:49
  • @psubsee2003 Ah, I didn't think of it this way, but I guess it could be thought of as such. As I didn't know the original developer's intent, I saw this as a race condition that should be handled explicitly. If it was the developer's intent for it not to be handled differently, then yes, I think it can be improved upon, though it's probably not a high priority. – user193130 Oct 20 '15 at 17:04
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    At the end of the day the edit is harming the post, that's what the reviewer sees, so the reviewer correctly rejects the edit. The fact that the harmful edit came about due to a conflict with another edit, even though the edit was made in good faith, rather than just being a bad edit, isn't really relevant. The correct action in either case is just to reject the edit. It's not like there's some punitive action that needs to be undone. – Servy Oct 20 '15 at 17:24
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I really don't know why there's so much pushback against implementing a basic tenet of software development (namely, use revision control that is sensible enough to handle conflicts) here on SO. But there it is.

I would expect something like one of the following behaviors which handles this case more explicitly:

  1. Use a 3-way merge to allow the reviewer to handle this situation manually

Since most reviews require agreement by multiple reviewers, this is out of the question.

  1. Auto-merge the edit with the newest version and diff this against the newest version (similar to rebasing). Also give an option for the reviewer to view the original edit in case the auto-merge failed.

That's a decent idea, although the fallback option is still dubious; in practice, it would probably fallback to just showing a confusing diff that would make reviewers approve or reject much like they do now, errors and misattributions included. However, the improvement in accuracy does seem useful.

  1. Edit Review would be diffed against the original version (instead of the newest version) and there would be a note saying there is a newer version available.

Since we care much less about the suggester's occasional glitches than about ensuring maximum post quality, this is also a non-starter. (And I say this as someone who has had several edits rejected for no particularly good reason across the network. It does sting, but them's the breaks.)

  1. Remove the Suggested Edit from the review queue if it has been sitting there too long and there were already edits done after the editor saw the post.

Determining when the editor actually saw the post is the only really tricky bit here, I think, since tracking the last load/AJAX-reload time for every page anyone ever sees is not fun. Instead, simply allowing the edit form to figure out when the last update happened would probably be best.

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