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Of late, I have noticed an high number[1] of comments by OPs whose questions I have closed as duplicates, who ask whether they should delete their question because they did not find the duplicate when searching, and now want to decrease clutter on the platform.

I have answered that they should not, because some of the dupes are hard to find and their questions will serve as a signpost, directing other users and search engines to the duplicate. Duplicates are supposed to increase the visibility of those frequently asked questions.

Is this directive still in effect? Are there some questions, like those that did not know the problem they suffered from and could not ask specifically for it, that should really be deleted?

Can we put some message in the text that the authors see when their questions are closed, that there is no reason to delete them (and if they do, it causes bad karma)?

1: Specifically, this happened 3 times to me in the past week. It might be a spike or due to my high vote activity, but it struck me as exceptional.

  • "I have answered that they should not, because some of the dupes are hard to find" -- this seems to be an important problem to fix. – DanBeale Feb 25 '15 at 17:41
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    I'm not wasting my time on dup votes anymore. My most typical comment these days is "Copy/paste the title of your question into the Google query box and take the first hit, it tells you everything you want to know". And that first hit is not often an SO post anymore. All these link traps to stale old posts is bad SEO. – Hans Passant Feb 25 '15 at 18:22
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Duplicates can serve as signposts. Most don't, but some do. Not all duplicates are universally valuable. Duplicates are valuable signposts when it's actually possible for people to end up finding the duplicate instead of the canonical question.

If the duplicate question uses different terminology, already has inbound links to it out on the web, etc. and you feel that there is a reasonable chance of people finding this duplicate for certain search queries or by following links that wouldn't result in the canonical being found, then the post is adding value, and we don't want it deleted.

These types of duplicates do of course happen, but for a significant percentage of duplicates this just isn't the case. Often duplicates do use the same terminology, and don't already have a lot of links scattered around the web. If the post doesn't seem like a useful signpost, deleting it is fine. If you feel that the specific post you are evaluating is in fact a valuable signpost, then encourage the user to not delete it.

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