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Many buttons on Stack Overflow have useful tooltips. Examples:

  • Question upvote: "This question shows research effort; it is useful and clear."
  • Question downvote: "This question does not show research effort; it is unclear or not useful."
  • Answer upvote: "This answer is useful"
  • Answer downvote: "This answer is not useful"

I was somewhat surprised when I hovered over the accept answer checkbox and saw the tooltip, "click to set this answer as your accepted answer; click again to toggle". This tooltip provides no guidance to the user about why they would accept an answer, in sharp contrast to the tooltips for the voting buttons. This tooltip is only explaining what the button does, whereas the voting buttons are explaining what they mean.

This raises two points for me:

  • Do users need to be told that clicking the checkbox accepts the answer? In 2014 after quite a few years of Stack Exchange success, is it reasonable to expect that most users can figure this out without hand holding? It seems reasonable to expect that most users who join the site and post questions have probably already been reading other questions and noticed the accept check mark before. Clicking on it seems like a natural thing to do.
  • If the answer to that is, "Users can figure this out easily enough," then I think users and the site would benefit much more from explaining to users what criteria they would use when deciding whether to accept an answer or not than they do from being told what clicking it does.

If my memory isn't failing me, citing the tooltip text on the voting buttons is a frequent occurrence here on Meta. That makes sense since they briefly state the heart and soul of how the voting system should be used. Much guidance about when and how to vote and when not to vote can be derived from them. They establish an air of pragmatic and honest evaluation of content as opposed to overly strict adherence to a set of rules. While questions about accepting answers come up far less frequently, it would still be nice to have a brief phrase that captures how accepts should be used if or when questions come up.

This also shouldn't be overly burdensome in a technical sense. It should just be a matter of coming up with and changing some text.

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    "Do users need to be told that clicking the checkbox accepts the answer?" - Yes. Don't ever underestimate user stupidity. But I do agree that the tooltip could be more helpful by telling them when and why to actually accept an answer. – Stephan Muller Sep 21 '14 at 14:11
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    Also, the "click again to toggle" part is useless and somewhat clumsy. – anatolyg Sep 21 '14 at 16:16
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    "click again to toggle" should move/become "click here to unaccept this answer" on the filled checkmark. – Jeffrey Bosboom Sep 22 '14 at 0:00
  • @JeffreyBosboom: maybe not "unaccept". Pick something easier for non English speakers, like "to reverse the acceptance" or something. – John Saunders Sep 22 '14 at 4:33
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    @JohnSaunders: Maybe just "to undo"? – Jeffrey Bosboom Sep 22 '14 at 4:33
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    @JeffreyBosboom: "undo" is good. It's the name of a command on most "Edit" menus. – John Saunders Sep 22 '14 at 4:35
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    Perhaps: "Click to accept this answer. Doing so means the answer solved your problem, or helped the most toward finding your solution." – Kendra Sep 22 '14 at 15:43
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    Let me see what I can do about this. I agree that it isn't the most helpful thing ever in its current state. – Haney Sep 22 '14 at 16:37
  • "click again to toggle" is useful to as a reminder that you can change your mind afterwards. A number of times I've hovered over an answer, unsure, seen that and decided to accept it at least temporarily. – George Powell Sep 22 '14 at 16:39
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Thank you for your feedback. I've modified the tooltip for accepting an answer as follows:

When the answer is not yet accepted

Click to accept this answer because it solved your problem or was the most helpful in finding your solution (click again to undo)

When the answer is accepted

Click to undo acceptance of this answer; you accepted this answer [timestamp]

I took inspiration from Kendra's wording in the comments, which I felt was quite nice.

This will go live in the next build (meta: > rev 2014.9.22.2591, q&a: > rev 2014.9.22.1881).

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