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Over a period of 4 years, I have answered a lot of questions on SO, and occasionally I get a down-vote on an old answer, which was valid at the time, but now better solutions/approaches exist, or should be updated to newer versions (of rails in my case mostly).

So what do people? Do they actively maintain the quality of their answers? I mostly notice when I suddenly get a down-vote and then, indeed, in most cases a better answer is already available.

What do you do in that case? Edit/improve your original answer? Credit the better answer? Delete the answer? I had the best answer in 2011, in 2012 a better answer comes along, in 2014 I get a downvote: how to handle that :) Just ignore it?

My general approach, in case of a downvote is to edit/update the answer, but I only respond to downvotes, I have no pro-active approach.

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    How you maintain your old answers is entirely up to you. I'm not particularly proactive about it; if someone points out a problem with one of my old answers, I'll either try to fix it or, if it has become completely obsolete, I'll just delete it. – Robert Harvey Aug 12 '14 at 20:26
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(Adding my answer here because I don't want a new post to be marked as duplicate)

I am having the same problem. I keep getting down voted for an answer on JQuery i gave back in 2013. It was valid back then.

why should I maintain my answers from 7 years ago? It was valid back then and got a lot of upvotes. Not only would it require extra effort that isn't worth it, it would no doubt become irrelevant to the original question. It's not my problem if the answer has become invalid over time and the person reading it can't see it's from an eternity ago.

My suggestion is to disable down voting for really old questions. Obviously that has drawbacks and implications, but it's better than nothing in my opinion.

Update Additional thoughts based on Cody's comment. Votes are literally tied to a "Reputation" system. So a downvote is a ding on one's reputation. A content rating system, such as one applied here on meta, where people upvote to say they agree, or downvote to express that they disagree (or it has quality issues) but those votes do not impact reputation.

If you were a stock broker, and you gave your friend advice 10 years ago about a hot stock, but they waited until last year to act on that advice and they ended up losing big. Now they are mad at you. Should your reputation be tarnished because your advice was no longer valid several years later?

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    Why in the world would you want to disable downvoting for old answers? A downvote means “this answer is not useful”. It sounds like you’re granting that it’s not useful because it’s out of date. That’s a perfectly valid reason to downvote. Actually, such posts should be downvoted as a signal to others that they are obsolete and no longer useful. Downvoting isn’t a punishment. It’s a content rating system. Content that is wrong is...not useful. Votes that have historical meaning only are not productive for anyone. – Cody Gray Jan 6 at 2:33
  • @CodyGray You say it's a content rating system, which I don't disagree with, but if that's all it is, then why reward users for the upvotes? If the content is no longer useful, why even have it available for searching? The signal should be the fact that it's a 7 year old question/answer. If I had 15 votes and the user downvoted once, it sits at 14 which still looks like a good answer, so it makes no sense. – Dustin Davis Jan 6 at 5:39
  • @CodyGray I added more to my answer in response to your comment. Too long to put into a comment. – Dustin Davis Jan 6 at 5:54
  • I don't really see gaining reputation points as a "reward". They mostly grant you access to more janitorial duties on the site. It's a privilege, not a reward. By the same logic, losing reputation points is not a punishment. It's all just balancing of the books. – Gimby Jan 6 at 15:10
  • @Gimby Now we're debating the significance of the rep system? At one point your SO reputation was considered during a job interview, just as your GitHub account is today. It's more than just a number referring to your custodial engineering level. How many questions would go unanswered if not for reputation? You can't sit back and say that reputation doesn't hold sway in the decision process for users. I certainly care less about rep now than I did back in the day, but that doesn't mean I want the work I did previously to be discounted because it's not relevant today. – Dustin Davis Jan 6 at 17:27
  • @Gimby by the logic put forth by yourself and Cody, among others from responses to similar questions I've seen, at some point, we would all fall back to 0 rep given enough time and "passers by" who downvote. Why even have a rep system then? – Dustin Davis Jan 6 at 17:30

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