-15

I have a question regarding the utilization of AI assistance, particularly with regards to answering questions on the main site or other platforms within the Stack Exchange network. I understand that the new policy strictly prohibits the use of AI-generated answers as official responses, even if they have been verified for accuracy.

However, I'm curious about the possibility of rewording an AI-generated response or answer. Would such a modification make it permissible under the current policy?

My concern is whether other users would be able to identify that the response has been derived from an AI model and subsequently voice their objections. I would greatly appreciate any insights or guidance on this matter from the community.

original post / re-worded post: https://chat.openai.com/share/005bb43c-c386-4015-bf56-9a01ee44c1e3

15
  • 1
    Unfortuately, we can no longer definitely answer that as the company decided to unilaterally change the policy. That said, even under the old guidance everything depended on us being able to reliably determine whether the content is generated. As they say, if it looks like one and quacks like one... In this case - if an answer can't be identified as generated, it is, obviously, fine, and vice versa. Jun 4, 2023 at 0:21
  • 3
    stackoverflow.com/help/referencing -- Since rewording doesn't abstain you from the requirement to reference the sources, I'd say it would be quite easy to identify that. As to how easy it would be to find out in case you failed to do so... do you want to risk it?
    – Dan Mašek
    Jun 4, 2023 at 0:21
  • Referencing the sources? Who requires that i reference the source if it's just a simple answer?
    – machine_1
    Jun 4, 2023 at 0:41
  • 10
    “My concern is whether other users would be able to identify that the response has been derived from an AI model and subsequently voice their objections.” - I most definitely could, because every AI answer I have seen, has the same elements. It’s trivial to identify OpenAI generated trash content. “Who requires that i reference the source if it's just a simple answer?” - You as the answer author should care, i as a community user, care if an answer is properly cited and quoted. Jun 4, 2023 at 0:42
  • 19
    It would be easier to write your own answer from what you learned from AI. We want to trust your knowledge and expertise, not the AI.
    – Dharman Mod
    Jun 4, 2023 at 0:50
  • 5
  • 13
    At the very least, blindly rewording AI answers where you yourself don't have the expertise to verify that it answers the question with some degree of accuracy is not permitted. If you cannot verify the accuracy of an answer you found elsewhere (regardless of its source), you shouldn't be posting it, reworded or not. We would treat consistently posting such low-quality answers as a problem, should it come to our attention. On the other hand, as Dharman said, taking what you learned from the AI, research, etc. and writing an answer of your own is allowed and encouraged.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 4, 2023 at 1:11
  • @RyanM I didn't mention anything about lack of expertise. The question is about verified re-worded answers
    – machine_1
    Jun 4, 2023 at 1:14
  • 2
    If by "verified re-worded answers" you mean that you used the information you learned to write your own answer that's entirely your own words and code, that's fine.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 4, 2023 at 1:16
  • 1
    @Makyen Oh, in that case, let me reference my question then...
    – machine_1
    Jun 4, 2023 at 1:17
  • 12
    Honestly, your original version was better. Shorter and more to-the-point. The AI just added a bunch of excessively verbose language.
    – Ryan M Mod
    Jun 4, 2023 at 1:23
  • The question that prompted the reformulation to ChatGPT reveals a characteristic of LLMs that its users insist on disregarding. ChatGPT is a computer program trained solely to provide satisfactory responses using natural language, but without consciousness. In simpler terms, ChatGPT is an excellent linguistic tool but lacks skills in contextualization, judgment, or content validation... Jun 4, 2023 at 4:42
  • 2
    ...What happened is that in your reformulated post, even though you provided the context that it would be a post for META, ChatGPT violated the Expected Behavior Statement. Despite having a copy of that statement in its corpus, the AI appended greetings, thanks, and tag line to the requested content. So, instead of getting better, it got worse. Jun 4, 2023 at 4:43
  • 1
    Anything you post that is not credited to a source other than you you must know from your own experience is correct & everything originally from another source whether quoted, paraphrased or rephrased by you you must properly credit. This is true no matter where content originated. Separately from that the moderators have not rescinded the no-ChatGPT-sourcing. How to Answer Help center [meta] Meta Stack Exchange
    – philipxy
    Jun 4, 2023 at 6:26
  • 4
    "My concern is whether other users would be able to identify that the response has been derived from an AI model and subsequently voice their objections." Misrepresenting the source of content is disallowed & unethical.
    – philipxy
    Jun 4, 2023 at 6:29

1 Answer 1

1

At the very least, blindly rewording AI answers where you yourself don't have the expertise to verify that it answers the question with some degree of accuracy is not permitted. If you cannot verify the accuracy of an answer you found elsewhere (regardless of its source), you shouldn't be posting it, reworded or not. We would treat consistently posting such low-quality answers as a problem, should it come to our attention. On the other hand, as Dharman said, taking what you learned from the AI, research, etc. and writing an answer of your own is allowed and encouraged.


I originally posted this as a comment, but it really is an answer, and the roomba will otherwise eat the question.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .