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I started doing review queues and one option there was to edit a question and I spent 5 minutes editing a question, but when I submitted, it said the queue was full.

Isn't it better the spot is reserved when a user enters editing (which indicates that queue has space)?

If it is a gamble of editing with chance of submitting (on new questions with a clear editing need chance entering is high, but chance of submit is slim) I won't gamble my time and never edit.

Plus it adds stress because it is a race, who edits faster gets submitted so edits are more in rush.

Update

I want to highlight this comment so meta users know that technique of reserving has been implemented before so it is not a technical problem, but a decision:

"Holding a spot for a limited period of time is...actually not an unreasonable solution. The system uses a similar technique for certain review queues where the review is "held" by a user for a certain period of time to allow them to thoroughly review it without it getting sniped from underneath them."

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  • 4
    Holding a spot is for a limited period of time is...actually not an unreasonable solution. The system uses a similar technique for certain review queues where the review is "held" by a user for a certain period of time to allow them to thoroughly review it without it getting sniped from underneath them.
    – Ryan M
    Nov 3 at 6:57
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    "Abandoned" edits are also a thing. On SO scale, it would mean that the queue would be full much more often, since the queue would be filled with "reserved" spots that would or would not be finalized and submitted.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 at 6:59
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    It can be reserved for a time like 10 minutes and user can click it to extend it.
    – M.Mavini
    Nov 3 at 7:00
  • What I would do is "ping" the queue every so often and let the user know that the queue has filled while they are editing, which could happen some minutes before the edit is completed and save a bit of frustration.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 at 7:00
  • @M.Mavini Reserving it "for 10 minutes" would cause the exact same issue that I mention in my previous post. The suggested edit queue to be filled more often than it is now.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 at 7:01
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    Race conditions are a thing no matter what you do. It could also happen that while you are performing your edit another user with >2k reputation (or the author) submits an edit without having to wait for review, making your suggested edit moot. It happens. This works more often than it doesn't, and it still better than this suggestion, IMO.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 at 7:05
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    @yivi Less submissions is better than making user a fool and letting user do an edit that won't be submitted.
    – M.Mavini
    Nov 3 at 7:05
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    No, @M.Mavini, less edits is not better. It's worse.
    – yivi
    Nov 3 at 7:06
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    "Isn't it better when user enters editing (which indicates that queue has space) the spot is reserved?" you are indirectly implementing a queue to enter the editing queue.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 3 at 7:12
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    @VLAZ One way would be to add to queue for a limited time when a user starts editing.
    – M.Mavini
    Nov 3 at 7:15
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    @M.Mavini my point was that we already have a queue that has a problem. Adding another queue on top of it at best treats the symptoms. Not the problem. And in effect, having a queue to enter a queue is similar to extending the first queue. Not exactly the same because there are different rules for the secondary queue but that's the effect you get in the end. One longer queue.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 3 at 7:16
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    When answering a question that just got closed, there is a grace period: if you started answering before the question was closed, you have a few minutes to submit your answer. Doing something similar for edits (where the "grace period" means that you can still submit an edit that you started when fewer than 500 edits were in the queue) sounds reasonable. I understand that working for 10 minutes on an edit to have it rejected because the queue is full can be frustrating and needs to be fixed...
    – Dada
    Nov 3 at 7:54
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    Someone correct me if I'm wrong but didn't the suggested edit queue getting full start being a regular problem again with the pandemic? They upped the limit to 500 and reduced the number of reviewers required to review a suggestion to 2 and that seemed to fix it.
    – BSMP
    Nov 3 at 8:33
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    The period for a dead man's switch could be much less than 10 minutes. Nov 3 at 12:07
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Yikes. It is a real problem - that I did not know about until now - that Stack Overflow blocks low-rep users from submitting edits after they've done all the work of writing them. That is gratuitously user-hostile and you are justified in being annoyed. I would not be surprised if we have permanently lost some potentially valuable new contributors whose first attempt to contribute to Stack Overflow was a slowly and thoughtfully crafted suggested edit that hit this block. Why would anyone stick around on a platform that automatically rejects their contributions for the sake of satisfying an arbitrary global limit they had no way of predicting they'd hit? It's a terrible first impression to give.

That said, the solution you propose seems more complicated than necessary. I see no reason not to simply Allow edits which have already started even when queue is full. It's not like anything bad will happen if the queue goes a few edits over capacity.

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    "that Stack Overflow blocks low-rep users from submitting edits after they've done all the work of writing them" Just for extra information - users with up to 19999 rep also have this problem when trying to submit a tag wiki edit. I had this problem few months ago before I had 20k rep. And it's indeed very frustrating to be blocked after you've done all the work. I had to keep the tab open and occasionally try to submit the edit again.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 3 at 11:47
  • "It's not like anything bad will happen if the queue goes a few edits over capacity." at this point, we may as well remove the cap on the edit queue. And I'm not being snarky - maybe we should. We'd likely get more and more edits in the queue over all but...so what? There is a fundamental problem there with having too many edits. Arbitrarily rejecting some from entering the queue doesn't fix it. We may as well eliminate one of the problem as it's irrelevant.
    – VLAZ
    Nov 3 at 11:50
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    Yes, it is another violation of the principle of least astonishment. Nov 3 at 11:55
  • @VLAZ an even more annoying version of the problem is where you have to go review yourself (not review your suggestion but to go through the queue, I mean) to get your edit into the queue - that is extremely astonishing. Nov 3 at 14:37

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