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I sometimes do a flurry of research, and find what looks like a very helpful question and answer somewhere in the Stack Overflow metaverse.

I upvote them.

Later, hours or days later, I may discover that while that answer appeared to be right, and maybe even was right in the past, it is out of date and/or incorrect. I then go to remove my upvote, but... it's locked, and not possible.

This has happened to me multiple times, and is unfortunate, because it causes the promotion of bad information.

Is the lock on upvotes really providing more value than the resulting inability to undo upvotes?

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    Perhaps a better process would be to bookmark your research findings and only go back and upvote after you actually try the various solutions.
    – charlietfl
    Feb 28 at 18:45
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    @charlietfl That's a nice idea, but unreleastic. I may open dozens and dozens of tabs. I have enough on my todo list without attempting to make sure I delay my upvotes until some vague, unknown point in the future. In particular, if the solution upvoted says 'this is not possible because x', but I later found out it is possible, then I believed I was at the end of my research and should upvote, incorrectly. That's therefore not a feasible solution to this problem.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 18:51
  • The process to keep track in order to go back and remove an upvote isn't significantly less involved though is it? You can use the internal SO bookmar kfeature to do this
    – charlietfl
    Feb 28 at 18:58
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    @charlietfl on the contrary, I just do either action (upvote or attempted reversal of upvote) whenever I happen to run into the tab. I cannot just 'put off my upvotes' until some point in the future where I believe I have perfect knowledge. That's crazy. That point of perfect knowledge is rare and difficult to know, and it's unreasonable to expect to reach that state before upvoting. If I'm not waiting for that point, then at any point short of that, I may in the future find new information that changes my desire to upvote.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 19:00
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    I am not going to store up questions to go upvote later, the action of upvoting is supposed to happen at the moment you believe you have found useful information. Some 'come back in the future and do it, use bookmarks' solution is not acceptable UX. Meanwhile, when I find contradicting information in the future, I will sometimes go track down wrong information and add a correct answer, but then cannot undo my upvote at that point.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 19:02
  • In that case if the one(s) you don't feel deserve the upvote aren't really of good quality I wouldn't worry about a stray upvote. That is not likely to cause a big change in other readers perceptions if they try the same code. you can always add a comment instead
    – charlietfl
    Feb 28 at 19:04
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    @charlietfl, you're really limiting your imagination here. In the case of a wrongly accepted answer, it can do significant harm. And this doesn't just apply to code, that's why I said 'stack metaverse'.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 19:08
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    Your question is about undoing one's own votes, e.g. because the answer is outdated. Outdated answers are in fact an endemic problem, and there's an initiative in progress to tackle that. You might find that interesting, in case you're not aware of it.
    – cigien
    Feb 28 at 19:13
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    I can argue the opposite. One vote does not greatly affect an answer or question. I agree however being able to switch that vote is a good idea.
    – charlietfl
    Feb 28 at 19:13
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upvote means you find the answer useful, if you find another as useful, upvoted them too.

So don't remove it.

For the case that it is outdated, you leave a comment that explains it and refer to the new answer.

If you really want to remove the upvote, you can only edit the question, what could be against the rules.

Anwers are in that regard different:

If an answer was good, but you get a better one, removed the accept from the old answer and use it on the new one

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    I think the question is talking about removing a vote from a specific answer, unrelated to the other answers... Also it sounds like the OP of this meta is not necessarily the OP of the questions whose answers they vote on
    – Tomerikoo
    Feb 28 at 18:46
  • as is aid in my answer, he shpuldn't rtemove his upvote on the old answer
    – nbk
    Feb 28 at 18:49
  • I don't see anywhere in the answer where you said they shouldn't remove a vote
    – Tomerikoo
    Feb 28 at 18:50
  • it was implied by the frist sentece, to upvote teh second too and let the old one stay
    – nbk
    Feb 28 at 18:52
  • This is indeed in regards to questions that I did not ask, just questions I find through google that others have asked.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 18:52
  • What if the others are not good as well? Should he just upvote all answers just to "balance" the votes even though they don't "deserve" it?
    – Tomerikoo
    Feb 28 at 18:53
  • he said that the fiorst was helpful, so the upvote is the right response.
    – nbk
    Feb 28 at 18:55
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    No. I said it appeared helpful, but was later discovered to be incorrect.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 18:56
  • in my changed answer, i explained that ypou have to edit the answer , to remove the upvote, but that can be against the rules
    – nbk
    Feb 28 at 18:57
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    While I have enough rep to do this, that's something most users don't have, and is not fundamentally a reasonable UX solution to this problem. But hey, I'll keep that in mind for next time.
    – Kyle Baker
    Feb 28 at 19:03
  • Although your situation is understandable, it might be unsolvable: on the one hand, you do not want to defer voting until sure about the helpfulness. On the other - SO needs to ensure votes do not get changed on a whim. Granted, the edit unlock is used as a loophole in such situations, but it serves a very specific purpose - to allow those who voted on the previous revision to reevaluate their decision (especially for those who found the post unhelpful). Given the above, if I were a decision-maker, I would choose to sacrifice some usability to preserve the benefits the vote lock provides. Feb 28 at 20:34

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