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One of my recently raised flags got declined for the following reason.

Using standard flags helps us prioritize problems and resolve them faster. Please familiarize yourself with the list of standard flags

Which apparently is common practice. However, the question I flagged was asked solely because of a bug in the tool that was being used. There is no standard flag to report questions related to bugs and thus in this case I opted for the "in need of moderator intervention" flag.

To avoid situations such as above (where I believe I raised the correct flag and it got declined incorrectly), I would like to suggest the following.

Add a flag for questions related to bugs. Users raising that flag would be able to provide a URL to, for example, a GitHub issue related to that bug. Questions could then be closed in the same way as duplicate questions with a link to more information about the bug (GitHub issue or the like). Adding the bug flag would add the following benefits:

  • Moderators would receive less "in need of moderator intervention" flags;
  • The raised question would be answered (question is related to a bug) and could be closed;
  • The question would be connected to a bug report, where the discussion could continue;
  • Stack Overflow users would not waste their time on trying to help out on issues that are in the software itself (which might not be obvious at first).

edit: Fellow community members, most comments are about the aspect of closing a question after raising the proposed flag. This could be an option as clearly stated. Questions could also remain open. You are going past the point I am trying to make here. But judging by the downvotes you have made up your mind. You like the status quo and that is why I will just continue raising "in need of moderator intervention" flags for questions related to bugs as I did in the past. Enjoy your time here.

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  • What if the OP don't know that it's a bug? when you face an issue, you cannot know if it's your code or a system bug so such question is still valid. I answer a lot of question related to bug to actually say this is a bug and maybe provide an alternative – Temani Afif Jun 14 at 9:53
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    What's to stop someone just answering the question and saying it's a bug and linking to the relevant bug report. "It's a bug in X introduced in version Y, the bug report can be found here" is a valid answer. As described here – Nick Jun 14 at 9:54
  • @TermaniAfif Of course raising the question is valid. The point is to help out the OP with his/her problem. In case of a bug that would be pointed them to a bug report or the like. The question is then not worth spending more time on by the community in my opinion. – dkreeft Jun 14 at 9:55
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    no, you are wrong. I gave a lot of alternatives to counter bugs to have a working code. If something is buggy we use something different. An example of a recent question related to bug I have answered: stackoverflow.com/q/62322584/8620333 – Temani Afif Jun 14 at 9:57
  • @TermaniAfif you are wrong, at least for the example you provide. Pointing out an alternative as an answer to a question is not the actual answer right? – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:00
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    @dkreeft Did you read their question?: "What CSS would display the fixed background pattern in full width?" - The answer perfectly answers that – Nick Jun 14 at 10:02
  • why not? if you face a bug, you stop and wait until the bug get fixed? I don't think so. We try to provide alternatives and they are valid answers to bug related question. Bug related question should remain open to either point out that this is a bug or to give alternative solutions to solve the main issue – Temani Afif Jun 14 at 10:02
  • You could provide alternatives any time, but they could not be the answer to the question that was asked. Sure, it could help OP circumventing the issue, but you do not provide the right answer in that case. My proposal is exactly to close bug-related questions to moment the proposed flag is processed, to avoid others from spending time researching/answering something caused by something other than a lack of knowledge/skill/etc. – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:17
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    but you do not provide the right answer in that case --> SO is about questions/answers. Provide the answer you think is right by poiting out the bug and I provide another answer where I gave a working code doing the same without any bug. It's up to the community/ the OP/ to any future user to pick the suitable answer. You can even downvote the answer providing alternatives if you think they aren't useful BUT you should not stop people from providing answers simply because a bug is in play. – Temani Afif Jun 14 at 10:20
  • Whether the proposed bug flag would close the issue or not (that is something we could decide on later), everyone is free to open another question after the flag that is more inline with how to do X when I cannot use Y. My point is avoiding people asking for how to do X with Y and people coming up with A, B, C that are not related to Y in the first place and could thus be off-topic. Given the possibility that some users would continue raising question flags because of a bug, you also run into the issue of users raising flags on the answers for being non-related. Result: more work for everyone! – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:29
  • My point is avoiding people asking for how to do X with Y and people coming up with A, B, C that are not related to Y in the first place and could thus be off-topic ---> and what if Y is not the good solution to start with, what if Y is the wrong way to solve X. Providing A,B, C is not off-topic at all especially if the solution is a lot better. Again SO is about answers, you should not prevent people from giving answers even if you think they are wrong. You can downvote them and upvote the correct one. – Temani Afif Jun 14 at 10:43
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    I'm not liking this at all. You're proposing that all questions that are caused by a bug of some sort, should just outright be closed! No solutions, no workarounds, just "Closed - buggy software" ⭠ you're on your own! How does that make a better internet? Some bugs are also never fixed in subsequent releases. – Scratte Jun 14 at 11:02
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[T]he question I flagged was asked solely because of a bug in the tool that was being used. There is no standard flag to report questions related to bugs and thus in this case I opted for the "in need of moderator intervention" flag.

That's correct. There is no flag to report questions caused by bugs. Moderators do not need to intervene in these cases.

Instead, you should either:

  1. Cast a vote (or flag) to close the question as a typo/not reproducible, or
  2. Post an answer explaining that the problem is caused by a bug and linking to the associated bug report.

Do the former if you think no one else will ever have the same question/issue again; otherwise, do the latter.

The purpose of the declined flag message was to try and persuade you to use one of the "recommend closure" flags instead (option #1).

Add a flag for questions related to bugs. Users raising that flag would be able to provide a URL to, for example, a GitHub issue related to that bug. Questions could then be closed in the same way as duplicate questions with a link to more information about the bug (GitHub issue or the like).

This seems at first like a compelling idea, but I question the need for it. Why not just post that same thing as a proper answer to the question? This would allow others to post alternative answers that provide workarounds (e.g., if you cannot upgrade to the latest version containing a fix for the bug for whatever reason).

In general, we don't want to be closing questions as duplicates of off-site resources, since we don't control those.

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  • I do not agree with option #1. Going with option #1 and raising a flag to close the question as a typo/not reproducible does not cover the described scenario. The question is likely not a typo and it would definitely be reproducible. As a result, the wrong flag is raised. Option #2 could be a solution, but would not be a good solution for some scenarios. Think about the scenario where there are multiple answers already, and the accepted answer is one that is not related to the bug, but proposing using something else, like here: stackoverflow.com/q/62322584/8620333 – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:07
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    Why is posting another answer explaining that it's a bug not a good option in that case? @dkreeft – Cody Gray Jun 14 at 10:08
  • Because people might rely on the alternative which is not inline with their intentions or requires more work, even though a bug could be resolved faster. Especially when you think about 'give a man a fish...', providing the alternative is not a sustainable solution that would work for everyone who has the same question. It is better to fix the cause, than the symptom, right? – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:11
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    @dkreeft If it's a bug I don't know what alternative you're talking about, the only options are 1) doing it some other way, 2) waiting for the bug to be fixed... If I were in a rush I know what I'd pick – Nick Jun 14 at 10:14
  • Of course, in practice most would probably go with trying to circumvent the issue. But the point here is whether SO wants to provide the right answers to the right questions or whether the community wants to provide related answers to questions that should not be there in the first place (because it is caused by a bug). – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:19
  • What would be against adding a bug as a reason for the "A community-specific reason" flag that is currently in place? Especially if providing a URL to a bug report is supported, once the flag is approved, an automatic post could be added with some meta information that could be the accepted answer instantly. – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:24
  • Because the fact that it's a bug should not foreclose the possibility of other answers, and that's what closing would do. – Cody Gray Jun 14 at 10:29
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    @dkreeft Not relevant to the post, but the more you 'cry' for something on meta the more you start hating this network. I personally don't mind getting a flag declined, and I've even stopped posting such questions in vain. I don't know how this would go, but simply focus on the good things the site has to offer :) – Ardent Coder Jun 14 at 10:29
  • @CodyGray closing is just an option I provide in the proposal. That could or could not be implemented. The problem here is that moderators apparently do not like to receive "in need of moderator intervention" flags and I am proposing a solution for part of these raised flags (namely in case of questions related to bugs for which no standard flag exists). You can obviously be in favor or against the proposal, but then provide an alternative to fix this problem. Doing nothing is also an alternative, but then moderators would continue to receive these flags. – dkreeft Jun 14 at 10:35
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    Moderator flags should only be used when you're requesting moderator intervention. There was nothing for moderators to do in this case, so the flag was inappropriate. You cannot take a single declined flag as evidence that "moderators apparently do not like to receive 'in need of moderator intervention' flags". It is merely evidence that moderators decline flags where there is no need for moderator intervention. That question didn't need to be closed or deleted or otherwise moderated, so it shouldn't have been flagged. My alternatives are listed above, in the answer. – Cody Gray Jun 14 at 10:51
  • @ArdentCoder That doesn't match my experience. I've spent the past decade or so on this site, and I have repeatedly made calls for things on Meta. It hasn't made me hate the network to find that people disagree with some of my ideas. It is quite common that new users don't quite grok the uniqueness of how this site works, though, and that many of their suggestions are disliked by veterans. As such, it does maybe make sense to slow down the feature requests until you get a better feel for how the site is meant to work. – Cody Gray Jun 14 at 10:52
  • @CodyGray No worries, I admit the site is dominated by veterans because most 'new users' are kinda scared away. Anyways, there are many posts on metas that discuss this issue and if we start talking about it here then moderators will flag our conversational comments lol – Ardent Coder Jun 14 at 10:59
  • @ArdentCoder You can find a relevant discussion here: How do I participate in Meta and not die trying? It is on the global Meta now, but at one point in time, MSO was the global Meta, so that Q&A was actually written for MSO. – Cody Gray Jun 14 at 11:06
  • @CodyGray What a question! Though I won't rate the answers there, if that's what you people expect the participants to be like, then at least make it visible to new meta participants so that they 'understand' its workings and act accordingly. Otherwise, there is a high chance that some users take negative incidents personally. – Ardent Coder Jun 14 at 11:19

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