38

Should I do so? Or should I confine myself to flag only for closing and downvote the question. (and then the question gets deleted by its own after time)

I did it with the "need moderator intervention" flag so far and wrote there why. But it seems that this is not the right way because most of my flags (where I flagged for deletion) are declined with the hint to read how to flag.

But I read this multiple times and I thought maybe its worth to mark really bad questions, which are sometimes not even questions and meet many of the criterias, a special way.

So I searched a bit and read about flag for removal and here too. But I don't have such flag.

I also found an article about Flag Stack Overflow Documentation for deletion.

But none of them helped me with my question and it has no sense if I make all the mods more work than they have to do anyway.

So how should I handle this questions? Choose randomly one of the criterias (if there are multiple)

Or should I continue making moderator intervention flags and maybe describing the reason even more detailed?

34

Or should I confine myself to flag only for closing and downvote the question.

Exactly. With downvotes and close flags, you ask the OP to improve his/her post, so that it can be upvoted/reopened. Other people can help with this process as well, by commenting and/or editing. If the question would be deleted, you make this process nearly impossible.

(and then the question gets deleted by its own after time)

This is precisely where Roomba kicks in. It will automatically delete bad questions after a certain period of time has passed. There are some rare cases where premature deletion is warranted (spam is one of them, but this has its own flag), but you can let the 20k users worry about those cases.

  • 1
    "There are some rare cases where premature deletion is warranted" These cases aren't that rare. Every now and then someone dumps a whole bunch of code with the words "why does this not work" and absolutely no research effort. – dorukayhan Dec 20 '16 at 12:53
  • 4
    @dorukayhan but why do they need to be deleted on the spot? That's only the case if they have upvoted or accepted answers. – Glorfindel Dec 20 '16 at 12:55
  • I mean, in some of these cases the asker isn't even willing to improve the question. – dorukayhan Dec 20 '16 at 12:57
  • 5
    Well, that's exactly what Roomba is for. – Glorfindel Dec 20 '16 at 12:59
6

You should raise a moderator flag only if there's no other established way to handle the problem.

There aren't many cases where using a moderator flag requesting for deletion makes good sense.

If a post is awful because it is spam or irremediably abusive (e.g. nothing but a rant), then it should be flag with the flags dedicated for this purpose. This is really the best way to deal with these cases. A moderator flag will get lost in the flood, the dedicated flags for spam and abusive posts are given special visibility on the moderators' display.

If a post is awful because it has severe content problems, there's no emergency. The community can vote to close it, and can vote to delete it too. A moderator is not needed.

There are a few special cases that merit being handled by a moderator. For instance if a post should be deleted because it is plagiarized. There's no community mechanism like flags or a queue for dealing with plagiarism. You should raise a moderator flag for this kind of situation and present your evidence in the message you write. (Typically plagiarism is found in answers but in theory questions could also suffer from the issue.)

2

Questions can either be deleted by moderators, high rep users in concert, via spam/abusive flags and automatically if they fit the Roomba criteria.

  • If the question is spam or rude/abusive, flag it and it will be deleted once it gets 6 such flags, or if a moderator nukes it prior to that. Don't bother about closing the question in such a circumstance.
  • If the question fits a close reason, vote to close it.
  • If you think the question is poor quality, downvote it.

Note that none of these actions involve asking a moderator to do anything.

High rep users can only delete closed and downvoted questions so your close votes and downvotes would help them do that if they feel that's necessary.

Obviously 10K rep users have been around longer and are expected to know when deletion is appropriate i.e. not usually before users have been given a chance to improve a question, assuming of course it's not so egregiously off-topic that it can't really be improved into anything resembling an on-topic question.

By the time you get to 10K your views about what should and should not be deleted may well have evolved.

  • Why exactly 6 instead of 5? – nyuszika7h Dec 20 '16 at 18:37
  • Why is 5 any more special or desirable than 6? – Robert Longson Dec 20 '16 at 19:41

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