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I am referring to this question: Tk treeview column sort (Here is the suggested edit)

The situation is very simple: we have a question with two answers. The accepted answer (let's call it answer A) comes from the author of the post himself, and I believe it should be assumed as wrong, because it is not working neither in python 2.7, nor in python 3.x

Then we have another answer (answer B), which appear first, starting with

"This did not work in Python3"

It took me a while to understand that the word "This" was referring to the accepted answer A below. Also, in answer B there is written

This did the trick for me:

Followed by a code snippet. Again, it took me a while (a little bit less :P) to understand that this was another reference to the accepted answer A.

Finally, I've realized that the answer B was incomplete, because in short it states that in answer A there is a portion of code that is wrong, but it does not mention that such portion is repeated twice.

In the current situation, I've seen this answer (answer B) as correct but badly written and potentially misleading, so I tried to

  • Explicit the reference to the other answer
  • Add that the code that should be fixed is repeated twice
  • Provide a full working snippet

Nonetheless, my answer has been rejected. I am trying my best to give a good contribution, where did I do wrong?

I mean, you may end up telling me "this does not respect the rules of post modification" but aren't we here to improve the platform and ease each other's life?

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    That edit looks like complete rewrite... Answer instead (unless maybe when you have silver/gold badge in language tag of the question). – Alexei Levenkov Apr 29 at 4:38
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    @AlexeiLevenkov Thanks for the tip. Still... I feel like answering means taking ownership of the solution. The answer I've edited is not wrong, and I am not the one who found the solution, he is. It would be more honest to just edit what he wrote, so why would someone bother refusing my modification? – Federico Dorato Apr 29 at 4:44
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    I converted my comment to answer, hopefully it explains enough... Don't forget that reviewers aren't necessary experts in given language by design of the review queue. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 29 at 4:59
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That edit looks like complete rewrite... I totally expect this change to be rejected. If author of the post sees such change they may accept it (author has binding vote on edits). Additionally to being an extensive change it added new code - that is really not something that an edit should do - When should I make edits to code?.

And "does not work in python3 (and apparently in python2.7)" sounds like you don't actually know what you are doing. This does not instill confidence that any code change you've made are likely to be valid.

Alternatively:

  • Changing just "this" to "The answer provided by Sridhar Ratnakumar" alone (or with other spelling/formatting changes) would probably be accepted.
  • Providing new cleaned up answer instead is recommended option if you want to provide information you have in your edit.
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  • and apparently in python2.7 is due to this affirmation not coming from me but from another comment. Still, I understand your point, but what I wrote in my comment is still valid: I feel like answering means taking ownership of the solution. The answer I've edited is not wrong, and I am not the one who found the solution, he is. It would be more honest to just edit what he wrote, so why would someone bother refusing my modification? – Federico Dorato Apr 29 at 4:59
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    I would reject that edit too. Putting a lot of words (and especially code) into author's mouth is not something to take lightly. – Alexei Levenkov Apr 29 at 5:03
  • That is a perspective I didn't consider, thanks a lot! – Federico Dorato Apr 29 at 5:15
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    @FedericoDorato FWIW, as one of the rejectors of your edit, I fully endorse this answer. – Nick Apr 29 at 7:36
  • @Nick I appreciate both the explanation of Alexei and your confirmation – Federico Dorato Apr 29 at 8:18
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    @FedericoDorato Worth noting, if you're truly concerned about feeling like you're stealing an answer, you can provide a link to the comment in your answer and make your answer a community wiki by pressing the community wiki checkbox before posting it, this will mean that it's a community answer and you won't get any reputation or anything for upvotes, as if it were just, well, a communal answer :) – Nick Apr 29 at 9:48
  • @Nick New day, new things learnt! Thanks a lot – Federico Dorato Apr 30 at 6:08

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