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I've recently noticed that moderators are now able to edit a section below the Help Center's search box on the landing page. For reference, two other sites that are using this section as well are Hardware Recs and Code Review.

While I have added in a simple section for starters, thoughts and suggestions are welcome.

logged-out view of the help center's landing page, with editable section circled

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    Okay, so this is a step in the right direction. – anonymous Oct 25 '19 at 7:03
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    Just to be sure I get this right: you can edit that whole section, including markdown? So the title "Welcome to the...." can be removed/replaced as well? – rene Oct 25 '19 at 7:08
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    Yes, @rene. That is correct. We could probably even put a YouTube video or an animated GIF there. Think big! – Cody Gray Oct 25 '19 at 7:45
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    We need a queue for this, normal users should first approve youtube channels of moderators. – Sinatr Oct 25 '19 at 7:55
  • @rene I think it's just markdown and basic HTML, since it's using the same post rich text editor. – Samuel Liew Oct 25 '19 at 8:14
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    I think a big problem is people not looking at this stuff to begin with, maybe something in place so that new users have to read a certain page outlining how-to-ask, once they've read that, then they can post a question - not sure how to enforce the reading aspect though :S – treyBake Oct 25 '19 at 13:34
  • How about linking actual meta-threads instead of SO's own documentation? I think that users can gain more information from meta-threads instead of the help center's official documentation – weegee Oct 26 '19 at 4:38
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    @CodyGray We need a "Welcome to Stack Overflow" marquee and an autoplay MIDI as well – Machavity Oct 26 '19 at 13:25
  • @treyBake Not sure how much that would help, but it's a thought. – Chipster Oct 26 '19 at 17:59
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    @Machavity Please no! We want users to actually use the help section! – Chipster Oct 26 '19 at 18:00
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    @Sinatr 'need' is probably not a necessity here. Moderates are elected representatives after all. though, I would like a feature to review and support content in this manner; I do think a policy based living document should be written up on the matter - so that reviews and moderates can reflect on what content is appropriate to promote. And to that point, it shouldn't be a youtube video unless it's on a channel owned by SO. We'll need a means to upload and stream videos from SO, or get those videos into an SO channel on 3rd party stream services. – Brett Caswell Oct 26 '19 at 23:47
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    @Chipster nor I to be honest! haha I guess it depends on the person, but people signing up because they have a realtime problem will probably skip the "welcome to.." section - which would suck if people would put this much effort into formatting it and providing info, hence I reckon a mandatory visit before posting would be good - but I could be wrong :S – treyBake Oct 28 '19 at 17:00
  • Don't think it needs a full answer but "Meta" is just a short hand way of writing Meta Stack Overflow and would probably be better writing the full name to further emphasise its connection to the main site – Sayse Oct 30 '19 at 8:40
18

Let me re-use an investigation for a potential feature request I posted earlier on MSE:

Are there any statistics on how often a search in the Help Center ends in "0 Results"

That request for statistics also asks for a top 10 of search terms used that return 0 results. My plan was to post a feature request to have that empty "0 results" page turn into something useful. The lack of response is probably due to pressing matters elsewhere and/or the significance of the request is misunderstood.

But I'm fine to scale it down and instead use that same list of often looked for but never found topics to take up the space on that help center page.

I imagine we can based on the statistics find the matching posts and provide links to it or write new meta posts for search terms that are even new to us. We can repeat that process each quarter so it matches with what actual users try to find but fail miserably on.

I'm not a writer but for style I imagine a simple bullet list without a heading, all written in a first person style, and linked to the appropriate MSO post:

  • "I'm down voted! 😢 "
  • "My question is on hold! 🤷‍♂️"
  • "I reached my limit! 🤦‍♀️"

you get the idea. I guess we take those phrases from the titles from deleted meta questions over the last week.

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    C’mon, emojis? You know I was kidding here, right? – Cody Gray Oct 25 '19 at 20:19
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    "I reached my limit!" <- Finally, a Help Center article for people who have reviewed thousands of terrible posts! :P – Laurel Oct 26 '19 at 0:45
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    @Laurel: How did that go, ah yes: "Come back in 14 hours". – Nathan Tuggy Oct 26 '19 at 9:09
  • I believe the exact message was "Come back in due time" :P – S.S. Anne Oct 29 '19 at 19:34
  • I do not approve of this idea – SeinopSys Oct 30 '19 at 0:27
  • Well played @SeinopSys, well played 😜✨✔ – rene Oct 30 '19 at 7:53
  • I don't understand the upvotes on this... this isn't a good suggestion. though this could be a useful feature for some of us (as analytics and statistics go), it doesn't belong in the help center (let-alone the landing page). For, we promote the help center to new users with the expectation that they review and use it to find helpful information, not analysis over it as a tool that doesn't achieve, or express, that notion. – Brett Caswell Dec 3 '19 at 20:25
  • @BrettCaswell it is an awesome suggestion! It just proposes to actual put in that space that info that users fail to find. Not something dreamed up, just gather stats, do an analysis, publish the top 5 links of most often searched for but never found topics. Rinse repeat every two weeks. That intro will always be up-to-date that way, for all users, including new users. Doesn't sound bad to me. – rene Dec 3 '19 at 20:35
  • look, there is value but in a different domain and audience. For, how is it 'helpful' to person A that persons X, Y, Z searched for something in the help center and got 0 results? Is the intention to keep person A from searching for that as well? Now person B won't have the benefit of seeing person A, X, Y, Z getting 0 results. It's a self defeating premise of frequency and occurrences. – Brett Caswell Dec 3 '19 at 21:11
  • However, if person A is someone interested in the search patterns of persons X, Y, Z and\or the coverage of the help center as a product, it is a different matter (one of platform, domain and audience).. it's a feature for a different audience\user, not the new users we promote\link to the help center. In fact promoting that information would produce less accurate information. It should be in a different area. – Brett Caswell Dec 3 '19 at 21:13
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I think it needs to be both TL;DR and useful

The Help Center covers many topics, but it cannot cover them all. As such, we have Meta Stack Overflow (Meta.SO) to provide further guidance on how the Stack Overflow community works, as well as to discuss what topics are and are not allowed on the site.

The current entry is just a "Here's a couple of entries" with a broader FAQ link. By directing them on how to use Meta, we hopefully give them the tools to help themselves.

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    We should replace the link in "search Meta.SO" to a google search with "site: meta.stackoverflow.com" – Tas Oct 27 '19 at 21:27
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The welcome and links are not something that catches the normal eye (but that's all there on the page). It's true that new people rarely visit the help center, and putting the most trivial FAQ's in the link is the best we can do, so they pay attention in a way that makes it obvious that it's going to solve their problem.

Instead of "How do I ask a good question?"

How about "How to get upvotes on my question?".

As soon as people will see this, they'll click it and proceed. We can use this trick to get people to read threads.


Users feel ugh when they are re-directed towards the help center. I prefer we use meta-threads to make the user aware of the site's workings. It's just exciting and not boring to read from a Q&A thread. It should be obvious which threads we should link to.

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Here are some of my suggestions:

  • I'm afraid that this is facilely approached, just putting up What does it mean when my question is "closed" or put "on hold"? is like doing a "formality", we can do that but then what's left with the purpose of giving the job to us? I believe we should rigorously decide what should go up there. – weegee Oct 26 '19 at 19:41
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Add a link to the Meta.SE FAQ

The Meta.SE FAQ has a lot of information that the Meta.SO FAQ is simply missing. Maybe at the bottom you have something like:

For more information about how Stack Overflow functions, see the general Stack Exchange FAQ.

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    do you think that's going to be useful to most people who come across this for the first time? Most of them are going "I just want to find the thing to press to ask my question?" – Robert Longson Oct 25 '19 at 16:17
  • Hmm I guess that's really a question of who is visiting the help center then @Robert. Meta.SE also has a lot more about how SO functions as far as bounties, etc. that aren't included in the meta.SO faq. Maybe a link to that faq would be more useful than just a link to the homepage. I'll edit. – scohe001 Oct 25 '19 at 16:23
-3

Suggestion:
A section "Can't find what you're looking for?" with links to other coding/general computer related sites.

For example:
Don't have a specific question about a coding issue, but looking for a review? check out Code Review
Got a question about generic computer hardware or software? Super User is the place to be!

Although I appreciate it is the Stack overflow help page so it might not be the correct place for it...

  • 4
    Best ask Code Review first before doing that. My guess is they'd say no. – Robert Longson Oct 25 '19 at 13:36
  • @RobertLongson good point that I had not considered – Remy Oct 25 '19 at 14:02
  • you would have to qualify and articulate the type of coding issue here that is on-topic for those communities and off-topic for S.O - in a manner that is understanding to the reader (us for that matter). – Brett Caswell Oct 27 '19 at 0:04
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I would like to use this section to set expectations about Stack Overflow and to be a small summary of the core functions of the site.

I came up with the following. If you feel that some sentences could be better phrased, feel free to edit it.

Welcome to the Help Center

Thank you for taking your time to check out how the site works. In this Help Center you can find articles about how the site works and how you can get the best chance in getting the answer you are looking for.

To enhance your experience and set proper expectations, it is useful to know that Stack Overflow is not a forum.
Have you ever searched for a question to which you found the answer on Stack Overflow? Great! Because that is what Stack Overflow is all about. Stack Overflow does not exist to to provide an answer to every question that is being asked. Instead, we are here to answer questions that are valuable to people beyond the person asking, who might be facing the same problem in the future.

In order to achieve this goal we have rules in place. In this Help Center you can find what questions you can ask about, and which questions you shouldn't ask about. Questions that are unanswerable or otherwise off-topic will be closed by our community. We also encourage you to read through the article about how you ask a question that is up to our standards. This gives you the best chance on getting the answer you are looking for.

We do expect you to do a bit of research before you ask. Questions which already have been answered on Stack Overflow will be marked as a duplicate. This allows us to keep the high value, up-to-date answers in one place. Please note that it is not necessarily bad to ask a duplicate question. Sometimes your search query yielded no result. In this case your duplicate question can serve as a sign post and might help future visitors to find the answer they are looking for.

Do you have a question about Stack Overflow that you can't find in the Help Center? Try to see if you can find it on Meta Stack Overflow. Frequently asked questions can be found here, or you can use a search engine to search what you are looking for. It is also possible that what you are looking for has not been asked/answered yet. In that case, you can ask a new question on Meta. The community, moderators and staff members there might be able to help you out. Do you (strongly) disagree with something that happened on Stack Overflow? In that case you are also free to ask a new question on Meta, but keep it constructive and keep an open mind to those who might have a different point of view.

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    Too long, I think. – yivi Oct 25 '19 at 11:55
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    @yivi I don't know what the limit is. It doesn't look that overwhelming in the help center IMO. – Ivar Oct 25 '19 at 12:10
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    I don't believe it's too long because of technical restrictions. I believe it's too long to be a practical way to inform a user and keep them engaged. – yivi Oct 25 '19 at 12:11
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    I added the bold text for those who quickly scan over the text to at least get the main point across. The users who will see this already went willingly to the help center, so that might increase the chance that they actually read it. And I feel that those who come to the help center focused to find a specific resource/piece of information wont be stopped by that wiki regardless of the length. – Ivar Oct 25 '19 at 12:24
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    People don’t bother taking the tour, which has about 10% of the text of this answer. I don’t think this would be useful. I agree with the sentiment, though! :) – Cris Luengo Oct 25 '19 at 13:27
  • It's agreeable to say it should be a summary to set expectations - Your sample of such a summary seems less agreeable. Though, I would use this summary, personally. Perhaps we should keep it in the character limit of a comment though. – Brett Caswell Oct 26 '19 at 23:57
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    I feel you could omit the first paragraph, and most of the paragraph about dupes (besides the first sentence) – Tas Oct 28 '19 at 2:21
-3

For starters, I think the section you've added is sensible - as it links to resources we often cite.

And following that sentiment, I think we should consider a trending section as it relates to Stack Overflow activity and the help center; something that correlates on that activity to linked resources in the help center. The concept should relay that linking\citing help center material bears some results; though, such scenarios are actually undesirable occurrences. For example, questions that put on hold after citing (could be irrespective of flagging), but they are subsequently edited and answered with an accepted answer.

In other words, a means to relate that Stack Overflow members promote help and center resources and it bears some results.

-11

I'd put something like this there:

Congratulations!

You've found the Help Center, which is something 99% of our users don't read. This means you're well on your way to ask an actually answerable question!

So you've written some code, and it doesn't do what you want, or it gives you an error? Nice, we can help with that! But only if you create a new example, from scratch, which still exhibits the same behavior. Is that hard? Is that a lot of work? Damn right it is! But imagine that we would have to do that for you, and then the problem disappears? So go and read how to create a minimal, reproducible example right away.

Or you want to write some code, and don't know where to start? That's a bummer. You may want to pick up a book, or a tutorial, or ask your teacher. Seriously, starting to learn to program is hard, but it's not really something we could help with. Well we could, but then we'd have to charge.

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    While I do think this is funny, it might be just a tad to much on the sarcastic side to actually use. – Gloweye Oct 25 '19 at 10:17
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    Yeah it's a bit tongue-in-cheek, but my point is that sure, we can pimp the help center, but the people who need that the most are exactly the people who never visit it. – CodeCaster Oct 25 '19 at 10:43
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    I like the tone of this actually, it makes things seem a bit less serious. It's casual (to my ears, friendly sounding), and honest and might get more attention. It sounds like something personal a user would write instead of something with sanitized, cold language. But it doesn't really leave any room for "How do I" questions, which IMO are the most useful and interesting (moreso than debugging questions). – jrh Oct 25 '19 at 12:35
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    ...99% of our users don't read If only it were this high... – James Reinstate Monica Polk Oct 25 '19 at 12:40
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    Honestly... you didn't go far enough! at the bottom put a link that rewards people with like 200 points so the can start commenting. I mean, they did make it that far. Also! a $5 gift card - talk about a new user policy amirite? – MattR Oct 25 '19 at 12:43
  • @James did you miss the "don't" or am I missing something? – CodeCaster Oct 25 '19 at 13:21
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    @CodeCaster: I should have said "this low" but I had the 1% in mind rather than the 99. – James Reinstate Monica Polk Oct 25 '19 at 13:40
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    Congratulations! You've downvoted this answer, which is something 99% of ours users haven't done. This means you're well on your way to do the right thing on Meta. – iBug Oct 25 '19 at 16:46
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    Sounds like something I would write :) But I am not sure that my (or yours) writing style is nice enough for SO – Dalija Prasnikar Oct 25 '19 at 18:42
  • Not sure why this is down voted, made my meta day – AAAbbbCCCddd Oct 28 '19 at 9:04
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    Just in case this ends up in the Help Center verbatim, "Seriously, starting to learn to program is hard, but it's not really we could help with" is missing a "something" ;) – James Whiteley Oct 29 '19 at 11:50

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