44

When answering an old question, when is it appropriate to add a comment under the question promoting your answer?

In my experience answering old questions in the tag, I have come across other users who left new answers along with a comment under the question promoting their answer. Here are some examples:

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Incidentally, all these comments are from the same user under different questions, and many of the answers they've linked to (including the comments that linked them) have been highly upvoted.

Given the positive reception to comments like this, I've assumed these are fine and have left similar comments under old posts myself. However, I was recently informed by a moderator that this behaviour is not appropriate.

I had left the following comment on the question, which was deleted by a moderator:

Many answers here are long and confusing and do not cover all the bases. Here's a table instead. – cs95

When I raised a moderator flag asking why that comment was deleted and requesting that it be restored, I was informed:

Comments promoting an answer to the very same question are inappropriate and regularly removed.

If this is the case, I'd like to know exactly why it is inappropriate, and whether there is any evidence on Meta to suggest this. Getting visibility for a new answer under an old question with many existing answers is hard, I think it should be fine under certain circumstances (such as the current answers being outdated) to self-promote a new, better answer to the question for the benefit of future readers, since that's what Stack Overflow is about. Failing this, readers will be influenced by position and vote bias and more often than not miss out on (subjectively) better content down below.


My question is similar to Promoting new answers to old questions, however that thread only discusses the use of bounties or opening new questions... but my question is specifically about self-promoting comments.

  • 13
    It is quite a bit more nuanced then presented here. For one, the first comment does not link to one of his own posts, it is a comment that recommends the advice given in a late answer by another user. Demonstrating a new technique not yet available at the time the question was asked. You can't use it as a "he did it so I should be able to do it too" justification of course. – Hans Passant May 29 at 5:27
  • @HansPassant not sure what you're talking about, I can categorically confirm every comment from that user shown here links to their own answer. That first comment in particular has 24 upvotes (at the time of writing this). – cs95 May 29 at 13:00
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    I'm not sure what you're talking about either, the one I found had 10 helpful votes. I could link to it, but preserving anonymity is the better approach. Cody gave you the go-ahead to flag them, I however doubt that moderators in general are all that keen on destroying info that's been judged useful by that many users. – Hans Passant May 29 at 13:16
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    @HansPassant OK, I've updated the text to an anonymized screenshot for your reference. – cs95 May 29 at 13:35
38

It's as much noise as it is a symptom of the system not deprecating information as gracefully as it should. Work is on the drawing board to better identify (and allow for the community to elect) "Canonical" questions which can take precedence in searches, tag wikis, and other places. We've also got to deal with dangerously old stuff at the top of the default sort order just because newer information still has a long way to go for votes to rise above it.

These comments generally mean well, and try to establish new beaten paths to newer stuff, but they aren't very effective and end up confusing folks on what the use of comments should be.

They aren't ideal, but they're all folks have for now. Unless they're really spammy, as in someone is obviously going way beyond just trying to be helpful and is just making a ton of noise, I tend to just upvote the comment so it rises above as needed, and leave it. Sometimes it also makes sense (when you can) if you see a space where an older question should be closed as a duplicate of a newer one, to flag and cast a vote.

It's going to be complicated, this business of nominating canonicals and making sure they get enough attention to stay up to date, and fixing the sort order issue exacerbating bad info is going to be bumpy too, but it's gonna be worth it in the long term (I keep telling myself that as I pound my head on my desk coming up with a rough scheme to accomplish both to talk about)

  • 9
    Can't wait to see this "canonical question" feature come out (and see people cook up sundry ways for its abuse :P). – cs95 May 29 at 13:53
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    @cs95 That's where I am with it, essentially. Requiring enough people to vote on something so a small cabal organized in chat can't run rampant with it, while keeping it accessible enough to be useful in niche tags (COBOL, I'm looking at you). Might have finally found that use for silver tag badges. – Tim Post May 29 at 14:18
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    @TimPost Considering your PR problems with curators currently, SO should consider promoting these efforts sooner rather than later. Even with nothing finalized, just knowing something is coming might be helpful. Additionally, if you're going to start segregating "canonical" questions from others, this may represent a fundamental shift in how question quality will be evaluated, maybe even revamping the entire mission of the site. You want to be way ahead of this in terms of getting users ready. – jpmc26 May 30 at 15:42
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    No matter how you cut it, "canonical questions" is a way to make votes count more, either for certain users (i.e. mods), or for votes cast much later (e.g. this answer is two years old, and now it's wrong.) Instead of weighted votes, why not just add a new, default sort order, weighting answers according to their age as well as their votes? – jpaugh May 31 at 19:44
  • What if -- for purposes of sorting -- the graph of votes for each set of answers was linearized (to avoid highly upvoted answers counting too much), and then having each vote count for (say) half as much for each additional year since the question's last edit? Anyway, maybe that's a new angle. – jpaugh May 31 at 19:55
  • There is the danger that these promoted canonical posts will be perceived as an elitist cabal favouring itself. Perhaps allow the feature only for Community Wiki posts? – Raedwald Jun 27 at 8:21
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    @Raedwald By nature they'd be community wiki; they'd have to be. All of our research points at folks not being willing to make substantive edits to posts where the original author's user card will remain showing (thus, making it look like they wrote what you did), so for that reason alone canonical posts would have to be wiki-like to not get in the way of folks maintaining them. The rep earned is another consideration we have to discuss, you probably should get some kind of reward for having an answer become canonical, but it doesn't have to be in the form of a bottomless pit of rep :) – Tim Post Jun 27 at 12:50
  • "because newer information still has a long way to go for votes to rise above it. "... and also because accepted answers are pinned to the top (usually forever), no matter how wrong or old or downvoted they are. – Flimm Jun 28 at 9:56
43

I think these can be useful, and indeed I often post them (both to promote my own or others' answers).

First, let me counter a few points made by Cody:

You're saying that users won't take the time to read through all the answers to a question in order to find some buried treasure, but they will take the time to read through all the comments to a question in order to find a treasure map leading them to potentially buried treasure.

Well, uh, yeah? The comments appear on the page before the answers, and it's not unheard of for a question to have a dozen answers and no comments. On such a question, the behaviour Cody describes is exactly what users will do, because the comment is presented first and takes somewhere around 100 times less time to read.

Yes, comments that make specific criticisms of an answer are fine, even if they include a link to your own answer. I don't see a problem with that. The link isn't really unsolicited. Those aren't what we're talking about here. They would be posted as comments underneath a particular answer, not as comments to the question.

And what about the case when all the answers are wrong in exactly the same way? Is posting a comment on each answer - that the user will get to after reading the answer - really preferable to a heads up on the question? As a user in a hurry, wouldn't you rather have the latter?

Cody's right about one important thing: if you leave a comment like this, you're basically trying to sidestep the voting system, which is our usual way of deciding which answers merit the most visibility. That's obviously not something to do frivolously whenever you leave an answer, or even whenever you leave an answer to an old question. But the trouble with the voting system is that it's slow to adjust to late answers, and that if you're trying to compete with an answer that was highly upvoted years before you arrived, you may be waiting years - or, indeed, forever - until even a genuinely superior answer overtakes it on votes.

With that in mind, I think that commenting on a question to promote an answer is justified when:

  • There are many other answers on the question, and
  • They're much older, and were highly upvoted before the answer being promoted arrived, and
  • It's fairly uncontroversial among users familiar with the subject matter that the newer answer is generally preferable to all the others (e.g. because the others are outright wrong, or because they reflect the more limited possibilities of an older version of the technology that has mostly fallen out of use), and
  • The other answers, despite their inferiority, are not obviously ridiculous at a glance, and a person without prior warning might copy one without realising that a superior alternative exists

In that scenario, a succinct comment along the lines of:

As of February 2019, all 20 answers here are wrong (they will crash in the case where the widget is unfrobnicated) except mine/Bob's; I suggest reading that one first.

seems useful to me.

On the other hand, it's generally unhelpful to leave these comments when:

  • There's only one other answer or a few short answers, so that a reader can realistically be expected to read all of them, or
  • The answer being promoted was posted at roughly the same time as the others, and has been outcompeted on votes (as opposed to not yet having the chance to compete at all), or
  • The answer is just one of several equally valid approaches to the problem, and the choice between it and the best of the other answers is a matter or circumstance or taste, or
  • The other answers are all blatantly wrong, such that a reader who wants an answer to the question only needs to skim them to see their wrongness or irrelevance to the question. (In these circumstances, the voting system will haul a superior competitor to the top of the answer list very quickly without needing any kind of nudge.)

I'd tend to consider comments in such circumstances to be flag-worthy (as, of course, are comments promoting an answer that's since risen to prominence).

But I definitely wouldn't go so far as to condemn answer-promoting comments universally. My experience as a reader is that they tend to be useful signposts, not noise.

  • 1
    I guess this is just one of those situations where the way that I use the site is fundamentally different than the way that others use the site. When I'm using SO to solve a problem, I completely ignore the comments and go straight to the answers. While I do tend to read the top-voted answer first, if it doesn't solve my problem, or even if I'm just curious (and I likely am, since I took the time to research the problem), I'll at least skim the other answers looking for gems. I wouldn't read any of the comments until after reading the answers, especially comments to the question proper. – Cody Gray May 29 at 8:15
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    Aside from that, I think your claim that the comment "takes somewhere around 100 times less time to read" is wrong for a couple of reasons. First, what I said in a comment to my own answer: comments are often collapsed, so they may not even be visible unless they're highly upvoted, and if they're highly upvoted, then so would be the answer that they're promoting. Second, I can't help but ask myself, what if this maxim were universalized? Can everyone that posts an answer also post a comment advertising their answer? Then the comments would be even noisier. It doesn't scale. – Cody Gray May 29 at 8:18
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    @CodyGray "comments are often collapsed, so they may not even be visible unless they're highly upvoted, and if they're highly upvoted, then so would be the answer that they're promoting" - often, but not always... and while I don't know the exact rules, I don't think I've ever seen a lone comment with at least 3 votes be collapsed on any post. That's a much quicker threshold to reach than outcompeting an old answer with dozens or hundreds of votes. – Mark Amery May 29 at 8:21
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    "what if this maxim were universalized? Can everyone that posts an answer also post a comment advertising their answer? Then the comments would be even noisier. It doesn't scale." - Why are they different from any other question comment in this regard? Whenever we comment, we're expected to weigh up whether we're adding more value than noise, and others can disagree and flag. That system seems to universalise acceptably. These comments are a niche case - people do leave them today, and it's not like we're flooded with them - yet can be judged by the same standards as any other comment. – Mark Amery May 29 at 8:29
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    A much more nuanced answer that's accounting for the on-the-ground realities of how SO is used. +1 – jpmc26 May 29 at 11:00
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    What do you think should happen to such a comment once an answer outpaces most of the other ones? E.g., when a new library function gets up to the second third answer in terms of votes. Should it be flagged as obsolete, or left alone? – jpmc26 May 29 at 11:07
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    @jpmc26 If the answer gets to the top spot (whether via votes or via acceptance) then any comments promoting it are almost certainly obsolete and flag-worthy. If it's in the second or third spot, as you contemplate in your comment above? Eh... I dunno, and I wouldn't want to try and suggest any general rule besides using your best judgement, taking all the circumstances into account, on whether the comment is still serving a valuable purpose or is now just clutter. Sorry if that's somewhat evasive! – Mark Amery May 29 at 11:20
  • I like this answer because it exhaustively covers a good number of cases in which these comments are appropriate as well as not. Also, this shouldn't make your point stronger or invalidate what Cody says, but I really appreciate the respectful tone of your post. Thanks :) – cs95 May 29 at 13:05
  • "if you leave a comment like this, you're basically trying to sidestep the voting system, which is our usual way of deciding which answers merit the most visibility" But that's a flaw in the system. If one person who is a domain expert knows that Foo 1.0 contains a dangerous bug which was fixed in Foo 2.0, released long after the answer was posted, their single vote should weigh heavier than some 50 up-voters who either voted when the answer wasn't outdated, or who are just innocent bystanders with no expertise, who up-vote anything "zomg programming!". – Lundin May 29 at 13:38
  • @Lundin: "If one person who is a domain expert knows that <snip>, their single vote should weigh heavier than some 50 up-voters who either voted when the answer wasn't outdated" And how is any kind of automatic system supposed to be able to verify any of that? Furthermore, how would an automatic system know when "one person who is a domain expert" is actually wrong, and the Foo 1.0 "dangerous bug" isn't actually a thing? Yes, the democratic system by which we promote answers is flawed, but there alternatives put way too much unverifiable trust in specific individuals. – Nicol Bolas May 29 at 13:41
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    @MarkAmery: "It's fairly uncontroversial among users familiar with the subject matter that the newer answer is generally preferable to all the others" How exactly would that be determined? And who is going to determine that? That's my main concern with saying that it's OK to do this: you're subverting the voting system without a good mechanism for correcting it. Your correction tool is flagging, which requires moderators to know whether "the newer answer is generally preferable to all the others". That requires domain knowledge, and we don't usually require moderators to have that. – Nicol Bolas May 29 at 13:44
  • @NicolBolas The system can't know that, nor can random users. I'm just saying that leaving a comment with a link, self-promoting or not, is perfectly fine. – Lundin May 29 at 13:44
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    @NicolBolas I recognise the problem you raise, and don't have any answer to it besides hoping that flaggers and moderators muddling through as best they can will tend to deliver tolerable results. But even if those flaggers and mods make a significant number of mistakes, I think a world where people are willing to leave these comments when there's a clear case for it will still be better than one where they refrain and we all resign ourselves to the best answers to many of our most popular and important questions remaining forever tucked away on page two. – Mark Amery May 29 at 13:49
-14

These comments are noise; they serve no practical purpose.

Consider what you're really saying here. You're saying that users won't take the time to read through all the answers to a question in order to find some buried treasure, but they will take the time to read through all the comments to a question in order to find a treasure map leading them to potentially buried treasure. That premise is, frankly, absurd. If someone is going to take the time to read multiple things, the things they read should at least be answers, not comments. The signal-to-noise ratio is far higher. And, indeed, the system is designed to emphasize answers, not comments. You can even sort answers by "active", in order to find the most recently updated ones, if that's your cup of tea.

Frankly, I consider these comments to be essentially spam—unsolicited self-promotion. Why should you be given two chances to advertise your contributions on the same page? You've already posted an answer. You aren't entitled to also post a comment that promotes that answer.

If you're linking to an answer that doesn't appear on the page—say you answered a related question, but it's not actually a duplicate—then that's fine. It's not noise, it's not redundant, and it's not spam. There's no other way for the reader to have found it. These comments are useful.

Comments that reiterate what is already extant on the page if you just scroll down? Blah, those are the worst kind of comments. They add no information. They just take up space.

  • 12
    Thanks for your answer and valuable feedback. To address this point: "but they will take the time to read through all the comments" Yes, that's exactly what I'm saying. Because the first thing that falls in a user's line of sight when they land up on the page is the question and the comments under it. Granted, not every person who comes across the post sees the comments, but at least some (>0) will. I consider that a good thing, because they'd be in a better position to evaluate the answers rather than blindly be influenced by position bias (as I mentioned before). – cs95 May 29 at 1:46
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    Why is your recommendation of your own answer less biased than the sort order? – Cody Gray May 29 at 1:54
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    It might be valuable if you were to express your opinion on comments that point out a specific flaw in the answer (such as x is not supported since version y, instead use z as explained in my answer). I could easily see those as either being again unsolicited self promotion, but at the same time, comments are exactly the place to point out errors. It seems the addition of "as explained in my answer" is pushing it from being a good comment to self promotion; hence why I'd like the clarification. – Davy M went to fund Monica May 29 at 1:55
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    "Why is your recommendation of your own answer less biased than the sort order?" OK, this is where context matters. You have not specifically addressed the situations in which people add new answers. The cases to consider are 1) current answers are outdated, this is not subjective or biased. 2) current answers are incorrect or do not cover important use/corner cases, this is also not subjective, and 3) your answer is a deep dive into the same topic. This is the only time I would probably refrain from commenting because my bias would come into the picture. – cs95 May 29 at 1:58
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    @Davy Yes, comments that make specific criticisms of an answer are fine, even if they include a link to your own answer. I don't see a problem with that. The link isn't really unsolicited. Those aren't what we're talking about here. They would be posted as comments underneath a particular answer, not as comments to the question. – Cody Gray May 29 at 2:00
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    @Cody, so, what I understand from your answer is: 1) it is OK to flag comments that self-advertise because they're essentially "spam and unsolicited self-promotion", and 2) It is OK to advertise your answer under someone else's answer, rather than the question if your answer addresses an issue/inconsistency the answer you're commenting under, has. – cs95 May 29 at 2:10
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    “the system is designed to emphasize answers, not comments.“ Not really. The comments are right under the question, above all answers. If you read things top to bottom like I’ve learned doing since childhood, you read the comments to the question before you read any of the answers. – Cris Luengo May 29 at 2:23
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    @CodyGray: "You can even sort answers by "active", in order to find the most recently updated ones, if that's your cup of tea." But you can't make someone sort answers by activity rather than votes. By contrast, if your comment is highly upvoted or there aren't many comments there, all users will always see it before any answers. You can't make them read the comment or follow the link, but it will be the first thing they see after the question. That being said, I don't like it as a general "this is OK" thing, but only because of the possibility of abuse. – Nicol Bolas May 29 at 2:46
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    "You're saying that users won't take the time to read through all the answers to a question in order to find some buried treasure, but they will take the time to read through all the comments to a question in order to find a treasure map leading them to potentially buried treasure." No, you're saying they might stumble across the comment when they get to the bottom of the answer and be led to some more up to date or correct info. You also hope that the author of the answer might edit their answer to address the concerns the other answer does, or at least point them to the answer that does. – jpmc26 May 29 at 4:21
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    I don't really have time for an extended debate in the comments, but there seems to be a substantial amount of confusion regarding what, precisely, we're discussing here. The problem might be that I'm operating with context others don't have. We're talking about comments posted to the question (not another answer) that do nothing more than "promote" or "advertise" an answer that has been posted by the commenting user to the very same question that they're commenting on. I've updated the question to add this context, because I cannot understand why this is so controversial. – Cody Gray May 29 at 7:29
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    I very much disagree with the claim that the system emphasizes comments over answers. Comments are in tiny print compared to answers, and often collapsed. The point has been made that comments of this nature can be highly upvoted as a way of drawing attention to them, but...um...if the comment advertising the answer can get a lot of upvotes, then so can the answer, thus obviating the need for the comment advertising it. This seems obvious to me, so I guess I'm still missing something. Of course, comments cannot be downvoted, so I guess it's easier for a comment to reach a high score. – Cody Gray May 29 at 7:31
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    "that do nothing more than 'promote' or 'advertise' an answer" That is contradicted by one of the example comments. The first one draws attention to the very useful information that the software has been updated in a way that obsoletes the existing, probably popular answer. This might direct users toward an answer very far down in the list (e.g. 10th out of 15) that they might otherwise miss. I don't know if that's enough to justify the existence of the comment, but it's enough to invalidate your argument. And bad arguments are wrong, whether they lead to the correct conclusion or not. – jpmc26 May 29 at 10:53
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    In such a situation, it absolutely seems most appropriate to leave a comment. The alternative is to radically change how we moderate questions on SO. – Lundin May 29 at 13:27
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    Also, the fact is that people who have domain expertise and who have dug down into one particular topic and written posts about it, are the ones who are the most likely to spot technical inaccuracies, as well as knowing that a dupe exists (since they remember writing one). – Lundin May 29 at 13:33
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    @CodyGray you have yet to respond to the point that the answers to old questions are likely to be objectively wrong and obsolete. In those cases, a new answer that is objectively more correct is not going to be able to beat an answer from 8 years ago vote-wise (and in fact, this is an incredibly frequent point of frustration for me when I'm looking for HTML / Javascript questions and the top 10 answers are all completely non-functional). How do you propose users be made aware of new correct answers in those cases? – Jess May 29 at 15:50

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