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In this question (How can you encode a string to Base64 in JavaScript?) the 3rd and 6th answer are basically error corrections to the second answer. The 7th and 17th answer at least add some few lines to add features.

I have an additional error correction (that I already published on gitlab). Adding yet another "error correction answer" feels wrong, but editing five answers to correct the bug also feels wrong...

So how should I proceed?


Note: I read here, that I shouldn't edit an answer to make it correct, if it changes the original authors intent, but I don't think that's the case here. I believe the authors of these answer wanted to encode the string as UTF-8 and then base64-encode the resulting byte sequence. I don't believe, that they wanted to do the UTF-8 encoding incorrectly. Yet the question remains: Should I comment on those answers instead of editing them?


In my opinion it would be best, if all corrections (those from answers 3 and 6 as well as my corrections) were incorporated into the second answer, but that would basically cause the same problems described here (give credit fairly, plagiarism).

  • 27
    Good question. The official answer will probably be "don't change any answers, upvote the correct one, downvote the incorrect one." But in this kind of situation, where the bulk of the work has been done in the original '08 answer, I would veer towards commenting and, if no response, editting the answer with a careful description. The end goal is a great Q&A. Imaginary internet points shouldn't get in the way, this currently looks like a mess. – jpp Jul 15 '18 at 13:42
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    That question already has entirely too many answers and comments, overwhelming about anybody that lands on it. Don't make it worse please, do nothing. – Hans Passant Jul 15 '18 at 14:16
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    @HansPassant "do nothing" - Do you mean I shouldn't add an answer or do you mean, that I should do nothing at all and leave it incorrect as it is? The latter feels wrong to me - leaving wrong code on a page easily reachable via google... – T S Jul 15 '18 at 15:17
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    Isn't this what "community wiki" is for? – o11c Jul 16 '18 at 2:08
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    Seeing as how the accepted answer is attributed to @Shog9 I would imagine the best approach would be to enter into a discussion with him to discuss how to best put this information where it will be visible... – Cindy Meister Jul 16 '18 at 4:40
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    eh, nobody cares about IE7 anymore. Right??? /sees myself out – AnilRedshift Jul 16 '18 at 7:59
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    I just had a quick look at the page. The question appears to be about encoding general binary data, specifically a PNG, to Base64. I don't see why UTF-8 is even relevant to that task. (But maybe I'm missing something significant, I don't do much JavaScript these days). – PM 2Ring Jul 16 '18 at 8:29
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    @PM2Ring Yes you are right, most answers to that question answer what the title implies and not what is actually described in the question text. Can those answers be moved to e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/30106476/…? I'll probably ask that in another meta.stackoverflow.com question. I think this meta question is still valid: The answers incorrectly describe how to do something (even if this "something" is not what was asked in the question). – T S Jul 16 '18 at 10:33
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IMHO fix the highest voted answer. Hopefully it's the accepted one as well. Do not add more answers.

Don't care about Internet points. Just do the thing that looks most correct to be done: make sure that someone who comes here to find a correct answer gets a correct answer.

I once did similar to the question What characters do I need to escape in XML documents?. See revision 6. Do you think that this was the wrong choice?


Update after the edit attempt:

Fixing answers through an edit will be much easier once you reach 2000 reputation, because the edit will no longer go through the review queue. You were really unlucky with your edit, since the reviewers rejected the edit although you mentioned this meta post in the edit comment, which was a good idea.

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    It might be worth making clear that this is kind of a special case—a 10-year-old answer is a lot less likely to be updated by the OP, or to get enough "correcting" votes to move a more correct answer above the long-established ones—so even if this isn't what you would normally do, it's still what you should do in this particular case. – abarnert Jul 16 '18 at 17:23
  • Maybe I misunderstood you: I interpreted "fix" as "edit" - but that didn't went too well: Rejected. By "fix" did you mean "comment"? Or maybe my edit description was too short - in that case: I'm sorry! – T S Jul 17 '18 at 14:40
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    @TS, I suggest you ping Shog9 who wrote the accepted answer (and who is also a moderator). It's a pity, really, coz you did all the right things, including linking to this meta. Neither of the 2 reviewers seem to have contributed much in [javascript]. – jpp Jul 17 '18 at 16:04
  • @jpp As PM 2Ring pointed out, the answer that I wish to correct doesn't really fit to the question description - Shog9's answer fits much better and should not be changed, so should I really contact him, and if yes how? Via chat by creating a new room? – T S Jul 17 '18 at 16:29
  • You can comment on his post. Ping via @.... I mean, this just a bit of advice, which was also suggested in a comment. The good news your work may not be "lost", we just need someone with experience in this tag who agrees with this meta to approve the edit. – jpp Jul 17 '18 at 16:32
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    @TS: By fix, I really meant edit, not comment, so what you did was correct. Unfortunately, the review system is broken as we can see. It will be much better when you have 2000 points, so your edits get approved automatically. Let's see whether you can reach this... – Thomas Weller Jul 17 '18 at 18:36

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