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I just reviewed this proposed change for an improvement request I made:

Enter image description here

We were just trying to improve the quality of the example, but the result was someone being pissed off - how do we avoid such situations?

It's no problem to just reject this change, but still, what we achieved with this requests was a user turning his back to this topic, or maybe entirely to documentation. And if there are a few users like this, it's entirely possible that destructive proposals like this also get through the review.

closed as off-topic by pnuts, Stephen Leppik, jhpratt, Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill Oct 2 '18 at 2:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – pnuts, Stephen Leppik, jhpratt, Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This is a great question. I'm sure it doesn't feel good to spend time and effort creating a contribution only to have it flagged by multiple people, and we don't want to turn contributors away just because the first draft of their example wasn't perfect. – Kurtis Beavers Jul 23 '16 at 12:33
  • and also I, as someone who flagged this, am not feeling to good about the result... – Florian Koch Jul 23 '16 at 12:34
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    Yeah, I don't have a great solution in mind, but think this is worth understanding and exploring. – Kurtis Beavers Jul 23 '16 at 12:35
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    As the overall quality of a lot of early (and many very poor) submissions gets improved, people will have a better understanding of expectations and won't be as offended by recommendations or feel targeted. – charlietfl Jul 23 '16 at 13:44
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    Don't feel bad for asking improvements. Without criticism there cannot be improvements. If someone does not want to participate because of being criticised it is his problem, not yours. – Dalija Prasnikar Jul 23 '16 at 19:31
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    @DalijaPrasnikar: only up to a point. I suspect the rationale behind this Meta question is how feedback can be done that does not risk causing offence, which seems like an admirable thing to want to achieve. – halfer Jul 24 '16 at 13:35
  • @halfer yeah that's exactly what i wanted to know – Florian Koch Jul 24 '16 at 15:01
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We were just trying to improve the quality of the example, but the result was someone being pissed off - how do we avoid such situations?

We cannot cuddle everyone's little special snowflake feelings; it just doesn't scale. The critique in this case was accurate, and I don't feel that it was offensive. If the user couldn't take it, well, sadly we would have to make do without it.

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    Despite how blunt and potentially offensive your opening response is, I do believe you're correct. People tried to be helpful by offering information about how to improve the example. It's none of the voters' faults that the user felt discouraged, and it's the user's choice whether to contribute, or not. There's not a lot we can do when that happens. – user539810 Jul 23 '16 at 22:19
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    All this could still be better handled using a normal comment system. There's a difference between being served an orange flag and 3 items of harsh criticism, and a discussion arising organically (which would also give the critiquee a chance to respond). – Pekka 웃 Jul 24 '16 at 13:16
  • @Pekka웃 the thing is that you can't comment on examples... SE gave us a very specific way to critique an example, via "improvement requests", we just need to adapt to them. – Braiam Jul 24 '16 at 13:30
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    @Braiam I don't think that's going to work. It's a totally stunted way of communicating. – Pekka 웃 Jul 24 '16 at 13:32
  • @Pekka웃 SE gave me lemons, I try to make quantum physics :P – Braiam Jul 24 '16 at 13:33
  • It's good this answer isn't addressed to the individual in question - talk about rubbing salt into the wound! – halfer Jul 24 '16 at 13:37
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    I agree with Pekka 웃 here. The whole improvement request scheme is fundamentally flawed by design. Instead of encouraging improvement by giving someone an opportunity to earn rep for performing the requested improvement, it punishes the person who created the original content, thus discouraging people from contributing to the docs at all. The way improvement requests affect rep needs to be fundamentally rethought and redesigned before this goes out of beta. – dgatwood Jul 25 '16 at 3:05

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