23

I came upon this tag in a review:

and synonym

With a description of:

The attributes tag should be used for any issues relating to a property of an object, element, or file, etc.

This seems to me a very broadly, and thus very badly, defined tag. It's questions are all over the place to. In theory you could tag almost any question with it, and thus it has no distinctive meaning whatsoever. It does not help making questions more discoverable, and there is no added value in using this tag.


From the tag wiki:

In computing, an attribute is a specification that defines a property of an object, element, or file. It may also refer to or set the specific value for a given instance of such.

Hmm, okay, but where is the added value of using this tag for indexing questions?

For clarity, attributes should more correctly be considered metadata. An attribute is frequently and generally a property of a property. However, in actual usage, the term attribute can and is often treated as equivalent to a property depending on the technology being discussed.

Could you be any more vague?

An attribute of an object usually consists of a name and a value; of an element, a type or class name; of a file, a name and extension.

So tell me, which of these is it now?

Each named attribute has an associated set of rules called operations: one doesn't sum characters or manipulate and process an integer array as an image object— one doesn't process text as type floating point (decimal numbers).

So an attribute has characteristics? Wow. That never happens without attributes.

It follows that an object definition can be extended by imposing data typing: a representation format, a default value, and legal operations (rules) and restrictions ("Division by zero is not to be tolerated!") are all potentially involved in defining an attribute, or conversely, may be spoken of as attributes of that object's type.

Say what now? Aren't you confusing attributes for behavior?

A JPEG file is not decoded by the same operations (however similar they may be—these are all graphics data formats) as a PNG or BMP file, nor is a floating point typed number operated upon by the rules applied to typed long integers.

Right. And what has that to do with attributes or tagging questions?


I can understand the value for more specific tags, like (151 questions) of (17 questions) as they are clearly defined and can be used consistently.

I can however not imagine that the really is valid for all of it's 7224 questions. A sample indicates the following usages:


Just seeing this collection of related tags indicates how broadly (badly defined) this tag is:

related tags

Please kill this tag!

23

is very broad, but it also highly used with over 7,000 questions. Most likely some tags need to be created for certain attribute-related issues, but for now I've settled on the idea re-tagging the low-hanging fruit.

This leaves only 3551 questions left that would still need to be re-tagged to burninate the tag.

There may be some more low hanging fruit here:

Related tags for attributes that have not been mentioned

Feel free to modify this post or suggest other ones in the comments.

  • 1
    jQuery attributes is a little sketchy to me, but other than that, I concur. – Qix Feb 1 '15 at 4:41
  • Maybe synonymize xml-attribute to xml, like some kind souls did for html, before re-tagging that? – Deduplicator Feb 1 '15 at 14:40
  • @Qix I've clarified that to mention that they should only be re-tagged if the question involves modifying or selecting HTML elements. – Kevin Brown Feb 1 '15 at 14:45
  • @Deduplicator Definitely might be something to bring up. I don't have enough rep in xml to get the ball rolling. – Kevin Brown Feb 1 '15 at 14:47
  • @Deduplicator: check your script :P It appears to add a tag 23, and at least once it changed a tag C# to plain C. (I've commented on 2 of these changes only). – usr2564301 Feb 1 '15 at 16:53
  • @Deduplicator: does this search query help? – usr2564301 Feb 1 '15 at 17:00
  • @Deduplicator: you'll have to sort on 'active' -- sorry, I thought that was stored in the URL as well. Then scan for your handle. – usr2564301 Feb 1 '15 at 17:07

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .