What is the implementation of reputation points formatting used on Stack Overflow?

Like, 10000 reputation points is displayed as 10k.

And 1000 is displayed as 1,000.

And sometimes, it is rounded and then a k is added.

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@Pang: Surprising that it hasn't yet gotten an answer. Perhaps more so that it was only asked as recently as this year. –  BoltClock Apr 18 at 9:19
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Also related: What reputation is needed to get the k? –  Martijn Pieters Apr 18 at 10:14
    
I think it depends where are you looking, as in the chat you see users with 2.2k reputation, for instance: chat.stackoverflow.com/users/2312574/mikedidthis –  nKn Apr 19 at 20:58
    
I think the core problem is that it is not consistent hence nobody can really come with one definitive answer. –  Shadow Wizard Apr 19 at 21:26
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but computers can't be inconsistent, so there must be at least one person who can tell how it's programmed –  Wouter J Apr 19 at 21:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Finally, after no one came up on this, I've found a way which replicates SO exactly.

Here is the code which I used and will use in my website ;)

public static string ReadableReps(int reps)
{
   if (reps < 10000)
   {
       return reps.ToString("N0"); // or just N for culture specific
   }
   return Math.Round(reps / 1000.0, 1) + "k";
}

The above is

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Pro Tip: the else is redundant. –  Zaffy May 4 at 11:13
    
@Zaffy, why? It isn't redundant. –  Amit Joki May 4 at 11:17
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Well, the execution would be the same even without the else. Because return terminates the current function thats being executed. –  Zaffy May 4 at 11:21
    
Also see this stackoverflow.com/q/19990446/823738 –  Zaffy May 4 at 11:23
    
Just empirically from looking at the numbers in a few posts, I believe there is no decimal for users with at least 100k. So it's the full number for rep < 10k, one decimal for 10k <= rep < 100k, no decimal for rep >= 100k. –  Reto Koradi Jul 4 at 0:27
    
@Zaffy updated... –  Amit Joki Jul 4 at 2:22

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