240

I'd ask them if their track is so very unusual that it necessitates square wheels. In general, asking questions before condemning the message/messenger is useful and kind. Underlying assumptions and prejudices sometimes inhibit our imagination.


54

I normally do both. First, I give a short clear explanation of how to accomplish what the OP appears to want to do with a reason why it is a better option. Then, I answer the question the way it was asked. I'll often put a disclaimer along the lines of "If you're sure you really want square wheels..." You may also want to review the xy problem.


40

1b. Ask a new question based on the underlying question you've discovered, linking to the previous one as an aside if it seems useful (read: has sufficiently upvoted answers), or deleting the original otherwise. If you leave the previous question, you should also consider editing in a short postscript to explain the reason this actually turned out to be the ...


23

In most cases "How to do X with Y" is case of XY problem and author just want X, or often something that includes/relates to X. It is perfectly valid to close such question as duplicate of "How to do X" unless author demonstrated good understanding of other options. Something like: I need to do X in FoooBrrr, the answer ... shows how to do this with Z ...


21

Answering those kind of questions too early may prove fruitless in cases whereby the OP changes the question in a way that you didn't imagine, rendering your answer less ideal if not plain wrong. Asking for clarification in the comments section would be my recommendation. There are cases whereby it's abundantly clear the OP has an XY problem, but applying ...


19

First off, I think there's a better way to phrase your criticism than The OP doesn't not understand the nature of the function he's using, it's an XY problem (xyproblem.info). That comes off as an insult to the capabilities of the poster. There are much better ways of pointing out what might be wrong with the question. However, your edits were ...


19

Well, that's actually what makes SO great. People try to resolve your problem, not to answer your question. See What is a XY problem


18

The first answer you link completely misses the point of the question. But it's an attempt to answer, and does not violate any site rules. So I don't think there's a reason for it to be deleted. Downvoting would seem appropriate to me. And if you want to add a comment to explain why you believe it's not a good answer, you're free to do that. I don't think ...


18

Then explain that in the question. If you explain what you need to do with any additional constraints that you have been given, then people can attempt to provide solutions to your problem that fit within your constraints. If there are similar questions without the same constraints, then they aren't duplicates (even if related) so long as the constraints ...


16

Thinking about community value, if I do a web search for “Can I use a hammer to drive screws into wood?” and find a SO question that is closed as a duplicate of “How to drive screws into wood?” where the accepted answer suggests using an appropriate screwdriver, I will benefit more than from an answer to the original question that shows a “cool hack” how to ...


16

Square wheel or XY questions questions are often easily answered. It always helps to have some examples. Here's an old one, slightly edited for demonstration's sake: How can I reset a stream? Because the first time I want to count how many lines are there in the file, and then I want to read the lines. I need the lines in an array. using (StreamReader sr ...


16

A good way to prevent attempts to help you circumvent your problem is to preempt those comments. This is good practice in general: Whenever you ask a question, try to predict what people may comment on that question, and then preemptively answer those comments in advance. Say you want to hammer a screw, and want to avoid people suggesting a screwdriver. ...


14

No, don't use moderator flags for this. In general, moderator flags are for situations that cannot be handled by the community. Answerable questions are answerable, even if the answer is "You're doing it wrong."


12

You are free to accept any answer you consider "most helpful", whether it is an exact answer to the specific question, an even better alternative (why not?), or even a textual description of the steps to take to answer your own question. In addition, you are free to ignore any answers of which you feel do not help you. They still may help others with the ...


11

Here is an example: trying to do something with CSS that can only be done in PHP. I can't tell you how often questions like these pop up, but I feel at a loss for choices regarding vote to close flag. I may take some flak for this, but... is closing the right option here? If it can't be done... say so as an ANSWER and explain why. A simple declarative "...


11

Yes. The acceptability of the question is dependent on its subject, not its background. A good example was mentioned the other day by Makoto: I recall a poor user attempting to use git rebase to completely undo all contributions that someone had made to their project because of a bad license. That isn't a legal question. It's a question about doing ...


8

In many questions, the OP isn't asking the right question to solve their problem. Either they're only trying to address a symptom of the actual problem, or they've misdiagnosed the cause of a symptom and are trying to solve a problem that doesn't actually exist. I think it's natural that this happens; if they understood the situation well enough to ask ...


8

I can't tell the difference between the two. Not without context, anyway. I don't mean to offend or ruffle you, but given any arbitrary question at any arbitrary moment while I'm on Stack Overflow, I don't know if it's this person's final, long-shot one-in-a-million attempt at a problem, or if this is something that they're thinking might work. The real ...


7

We have no real choice but to answer the ‘literal’ question. It is what the OP asked and it is (likely) what will remain on record for a long time to be found and found useful by others. It might be doing one individual a bigger favour to correct a conceptual problem but that would only be at the expense of many others. In my experience, all sorts of weird ...


6

Personally I tell the OP that he/she better go for a different approach which spares him/her time and nerves in the future. We also have to think about future visitors that may use a better approach too then when reading the answers. Since we like to build a knowledge base of professional answers we do not only want to help beginners fixing their horrible ...


6

If the question is asked "in good faith" and has enough information, so that it looks like it can be rescued, I try to read the OP's mind and answer the question I think is really being asked (and explain why). That's the essence of being a good teacher: improve the question as you answer it. But if the question is just poor quality, I mark it for closure (...


5

For on-topic, non-duplicate questions, Paulie_D's answer is perfectly correct. No need to close a question just because the answer isn't what the OP was hoping for. However, don't take that to mean you should forgo closing an off-topic question just because you can answer with "This is impossible." No matter what the question is, or how easy to answer or ...


5

I've had feedback that mentions that the OP is responsible for asking the right question And I agree with that feedback, even in the case of the XY problem. Granted, it's a learned process. But it's still something that can and should be learned. And I don't think we should be refraining from closing questions that should be closed based on their literal ...


5

I don't see that question as off-topic, even from the point of view you suggest. The remark of the OP about their software engineers is merely an ancillary footnote, which provides a little extra context to the question. To put it in a different way, if rather than... You must be asking yourself, why then don't just I use a local variable instead. You are ...


4

The XY problem is massively over-invoked on Stack Overflow. Sure, developers suffer from going down rabbit holes from time to time, and you've done exactly that. Now you realise you should have asked something else … so go ahead and ask it. But there is no reason for your original question to suffer for it. Even if it ends up not being the solution ...


4

The OP's question about freopen() is unclear. They didn't write what they want to accomplish. The answer assumes they want to use stdout again after redirecting it to a file. Answering the question in its current form encourages writing non-portable code and bad practice of redirecting stdout in the code. There is a reason why consoles have redirection ...


3

It's a judgment call of course. Answers on Stack Overflow always have to walk the line between being too direct one one side and thus "answer but not teach", and too invasive on the other side and thus not "just answering the damn question". Often I find that it's quite possible to tell how where your answer should go on this spectrum from the way a ...


3

I disagree with the accepted answer. Rather, I think it depends. Often times in XY-problems, you're trying to do something that ends up just being a bad idea on all fronts. It's bad practice, and it doesn't even make any sense. In these cases, the most useful answer to the problem for anyone is to guide them away from even trying what the question asked. So ...


2

If the asker has no idea about how to program a solution, then it's a too broad question. If the question is about a specific issue the asker encountered when programming the solution, then it's on-topic. But explaining the full situation might be noise.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible