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68

The acceptance check mark is completely within your power as the asker of the question. If you realise a better answer has appeared you can move the acceptance to that answer. If you realise that the currently accepted answer doesn't actually help you then you can remove the acceptance altogether. However, if the mistake is apparently fixable then you ...


64

There is a system that avoid deletion of questions with: one or more upvoted answers multiple answers, no matter their score I cannot see your question, but I assume it doesn't have any upvotes, and could be deleted. Hence, I suggest to expand the above list with: an accepted answer as Martin Smith says, that would not have a point because people could ...


49

This is a weird situation, because technically the user didn't actually change their own question as posted here on Stack Overflow. The only reason this didn't happen is because the user didn't include the code here in the question but only on an off-site demo (which has now changed). You could try to close the question as not having all the required ...


48

You can absolutely cancel an accepted answer. Click the green checkmark to take away the "acceptance." Then you can mark any other answer as accepted. The person who's answer was un-accepted will lose the 15 reputation previously awarded, and you will lose the 2 reputation you got for accepting the answer.


38

We cannot, and will not, place acceptance marks on behalf of anyone else, regardless of whether or not they are still active on the site. If a user is no longer with us then it is all the more disrespectful to act on their behalf. Whether you choose to accept this answer or not is, likewise, up to you. I doubt you will, judging by your responses, but that'...


29

I have already tried to ask the OP for a reason; maybe I can improve something, but there has been no response (for 2 weeks). What else can/should I do? Move on and answer some other questions. One accept gone will not destroy your future and SE swag. The OP probably unaccepted your answer for some reason or another, but the clear thing is that the OP didn'...


28

It's okay to post a polite comment a couple of days later. Make sure the tone is right, though. Pestering them for an accept is unlikely to actually achieve anything, plus it will make you look bad. It is, however, normal for many OPs not to react to responses, or to abandon their question altogether. You're going to have to live with that from time to ...


27

Let's answer a question: "How much reputation can dishonest users get using unaccept-accept on answers and downvote-undownvote exploits and how difficult would it be for them to exploit it?" Here are some points to consider: Both exploits will work only with reputation of 1 . Answers unaccept-accept won't yield more than (numberOfAnswers * 2). And ...


18

The user only unaccepted answers on questions with a negative score. These questions will be deleted with the account; only questions with a positive score are retained (and anonymised). This deletion happens regardless of the accept status on them, but perhaps the user mistakenly thought that would not be the case. In other words, you'll lose not only the ...


17

Life isn't fair. Askers are free to give the checkmark to whomever they want; there isn't a policy of any kind that allows us to move it to the 'right' answer. Note that, since they are the asker, they won't receive any reputation by accepting their answer. It also won't change the order answers are displayed in. The only thing you've been deprived of ...


16

It is essential to unaccept and downvote a bad answer. This is how SO works, it is only useful as a resource to other programmers when the correct answer is clearly visible as the correct one. And that works by the number of votes an answer gets and whether it was found to be correct by the questioner. So leaving it on top of the list of answers and ...


13

It happened to one of my answers. The following rules did not help: You can't delete any question that: has an upvoted answer, or has multiple answers (even if there are no upvotes) The OP managed to circumvent the above conditions by un-upvoting and un-accepting my answer, then delete the question. The rules above probably need to be improved....


13

There's no rule that coerces when the OP can remove the acceptance mark. There's no flag to be raised when that happens and there is no appeal to be made to the mods. So the OP can revoke acceptance for whatever reason the OP has. There are situation where I think most people would agree that the mark should be removed from an answer: The OP later finds ...


13

Users are under no obligation to accept answers. It's often more useful for future visitors to check the answer(s) with the most upvotes rather than the answer that's been accepted as they might have got to the real problem.


13

There is nothing you can do other than leaving a polite comment - but even then this may well be counter productive. If the user is a new user then they might not know how the site works - in this case a polite comment might be useful. If the user knows how the system works then even a comment would be counter productive and could be seen as badgering the ...


12

A user is in no way required to accept or even read your answer regardless of whether their account still active or not. Moreover, the whole idea behind StackExchange is posting answers that potentially benefit further readers as well rather than just the OP and getting rep from the users you helped. So, If the user is no longer active, you didn't help ...


12

The accepted answer checkmark is entirely the asker's prerogative, just like each user's up and down votes. Just move on.


11

When you mark an answer as accepted, the owner of that answer gets +15 reputation points. Those are indeed taken away if you unaccept their answer. If you choose a different answer to accept, then that other user will get the +15. You shouldn't really take that into account though if the answer has a problem. We don't want incorrect answers sticking at the ...


11

Nope, the decision on which answer to accept is entirely up to the OP - not even moderators can interfere with this decision. On the plus-side, as this is an accepted self-answer, your answer will stay on top of it and attract the most attention (as long as it has the best score). P.S. this action cost the OP 2 reputation points - accepting somebody else's ...


9

There is nobody but the OP who can accept or unaccept your answer to their question. There is nobody to notify since there's only one person involved, and he or she will be aware of the action. I'm assuming you're referring to this sequence of events: In this case the OP initially accepted, resulting in +15. The unaccept the next day caused you to ...


9

It's entirely the prerogative of the OP to accept any answer they deem most suitable. Perhaps they did not understand your answer entirely and found the other one to be nicely dumbed down more comprehensible. Or Tim lost his keys again or something. If the other answer is demonstrably bad or wrong, vote and comment on it appropriately; those are the quality ...


8

The post is back in its original state, and the user has re-accepted the answer. I've removed the comments on the post. Case closed, lets move on!


8

From the Help Center (emphasis mine): Accepting an answer is not meant to be a definitive and final statement indicating that the question has now been answered perfectly. So while the author of a question might think your answer worked, after three weeks they may have found a downside to it and use a solution they found elsewhere. Or the solution might ...


8

I'm presenting this issue to say that it's hard when a question that I need a good answer to has already been asked, but doesn't have a good/well sourced/accepted answer. The appropriate course of action for attracting additional answers to a question you feel needs more information is a bounty, not intentionally asking duplicates until you're satisfied ...


7

It happens. You could try asking in a comment to the OP's answer, or editing your answer to include whatever new information or context might be missing. But Accepting Answers: How does it work? says (in part), The bottom line is that you should accept the answer that you found to be the most helpful to you, personally. Which means only the asker gets to ...


7

Editing an answer has no direct effect on your reputation. You may lose reputation you gained on an answer if the OP unaccepts it (which may implicitly happen if he decides to accept a different answer) or if he or other users remove their upvotes. Editing an answer may potentially prompt other users to such behavior if the edit reduces the quality of the ...


6

The OP had already accepted your answer yesterday. Today, they briefly accepted another answer (automatically unaccepting yours), then re-accepted your answer. See the post timeline: When you mouse over the timestamps, you'll see there are 2 seconds between the OP accepting the other answer, then going back to yours. Perhaps they thought they could mark ...


6

Accepting is a privilege of the OP. Very much similar as I have the privilege to down vote, up vote or close vote posts. And given those similarities your feature request should be extended: ping every user that didn't use all their 40 votes per day ping every 3K user that didn't spend all close votes ping every user that didn't review their tasks in ...


6

Every so often I'll use SEDE to audit my popular answers to questions which don't already have an accepted answer. If it looks like the OP was recently active, has asked a few questions, and has accepted some answers, I'll attempt to engage them, e.g.: Did you ever get this resolved? It's intended to subtly nudge the OP into re-evaluating the question ...


5

No, there's no need to "honor" old answers with some special designation just because they used to be right. An old correct answer will presumably receive upvotes for that. Older answers should be kept around if they're still useful to people who might be using old technologies, but if a newer answer comes along that's better, then it should be accepted so ...


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