43

I threw a massive fit about this some time back, after I had been inadvertently logged out and noticed the change that had been made to the home page—even going so far as to make compelling logical arguments—because hiding free public Q&A (or otherwise obscuring the fact that we provide this, and no paywall exists) is a huge, unacceptable watershed to me....


23

Good news: This feature already exists for users having a given reputation on other stack exchange sites (known as association bonus). In that case, the user starts at 101 points, so can upvote, comment, and will be able to downvote in a few. The system considers that if you were able to have a positive contribution on any site of the network, you're ...


21

There's several strikes against this Is the concept described even on-topic for the site? The answer here is a definitive YES. Lists are a thing in Python and nearly half of the tag is for Python. That's not even counting C#, Java, .NET, etc. 90k questions would also be the largest burninate ever done. There's no way to retag or clean it up, so the only ...


19

Downvotes do happen for various reasons, not always because the question is poorly written. There's a tooltip on the downvote button. Downvotes should happen if a question does not show research effort, is unclear or not useful. Do all your questions avoid all of those pitfalls? If you've deleted 20 of them, I posit that the answer to that is no. I did ...


19

No, let's not insult the few caretakes that still dare to cast down votes by having their votes thrown away. Votes are my own. No one1 gets to decide for me if my vote is no longer valid. If my downvote triggers an action to improve the question I guess that is a win and if that is a good improvement visitors might chose to up vote. That doesn't mean that ...


17

Please don't. As a reader, I very much appreciate knowing what other people think of the question before I read it. It would greatly lessen my experience if I find out that even though people were trying to warn me that a question is probably not worth my time the platform decided to keep that signal hidden for hours.


17

Sometimes when I upvote, I upvote an answer for the sake of that I have read/seen the answer as well as to show my appreciation since they've spent their time. I persist this behavior on other social platforms. I see comments and I click upvotes to let them know that I've seen/read it. This is not how you should be voting on Stack Overflow. This is not a ...


16

Maybe it would be great to give the community a chance to contribute to the software by making it open source under a permissive license. This would probably be a nice thing for the community, but Stack Exchange is a for-profit company and they will not enable anyone with a plan and an idea to flat out copy their service and replace them. They also sell ...


16

You are making a lot of assumptions here about how, precisely, the question-ban algorithm works. Unfortunately, none of those assumptions are justified. The details on how it works are intentionally kept secret and not disclosed to the public. Even moderators are not privy to most of the details. However, what we do know is that one question is not enough ...


15

Stack Exchange sites are free. As soon as you have something like that, it essentially becomes an implied request for a payment for the answer. I'm not comfortable asking people for that (even if it's indirect payment via donation to a charity). Personally, the main payment I receive for answering and site curation is the fact that I get others to help me by ...


14

This simply isn't feasible. Besides being open to abuse, it isn't fair to allow some subset of reviewers to invalidate other users' legitimate votes. You only get one chance to make a good first impression. You have an infinite amount of time to get the question right before posting it.


13

The date asked has always been in the user card at the bottom right of the question and is now directly underneath the title itself. I don't think it needs to be added anywhere else.


12

Why not? Because answers are for answers. Comments are for comments. If the answer to a question isn't appropriate to be in the answer box, then the question isn't appropriate in the first place and should be closed. If someone has posted an answer in a comment, do as Robert Harvey suggests and Post an answer with the solution in the comments, and make it ...


11

I would be quite happy to sacrifice one rep every time I change a vote. I am much more concerned with the accuracy of my votes than with my exact rep count – as a good citizen of SO ought to be. Would this not fix the problem? Why is this still a thing?


11

No, because as you concluded your self: 1. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous? Yes. 3. Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post? Yes. 4.Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts? Yes. and per the guidance, a tag must fail these criteria to even be considered for removal ...


11

I disagree with the burnination. There are a few issues here, and the fact that there are 90k posts in that tag seems to be the least of the issues. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? Yes, it definitely does. It is a question about a "list". Tags can't get any more specific than this. List is a perfectly valid term ...


7

Changing how the downvotes are presented doesn't change the fact that fake points will be deducted, indirectly as a consequence of making a negative contribution to the site. Replace all minus signs with squiggly worms, and you'll still have all the rejects complaining about how "SO is hostile and unwelcoming with its worms". Downvotes will still be ...


7

This is somewhat resolved now that employee profiles are marked with a “Staff” indicator. Clicking on the user name to visit the user’s profile, the displayed profile name will now indicate when someone is just a moderator: Or whether they are both moderator and staff:


6

I've disappointedly tagged this as status-declined, since that's been the official response from the team. Quoting Yaakov Ellis, a Stack Exchange developer, from his answer on the global Meta: We will not be making the mobile apps open source. To quote the answer given the last time that this question was asked: The other 10% of the app however consists of ...


6

The most significant information should go on the left, which is where people begin reading English text. The least significant information should go on the right, where it is more easily ignored. That a question has been closed is the least significant piece of information proffered in the title region, so it belongs on the right side of the title.


6

Only one draft can be created at a time, and Stack Overflow does not provide a very reliable system for saving or managing drafts anyway. I suggest keeping this information in some other way, such as a text file on your computer or using an in-browser Markdown editor, such as StackEdit. Aside from that, I really don't see the point in taking developer time ...


5

While that would be very useful to the end-user, we cannot expose information about the owner or other members of a Team to users who are not members of the Team. Giving out information about who the owner you need to contact is would be a privacy breach for that person. Remember that anyone who just happened to retrieve (or guess) the URL to a Team can view ...


5

Triaging should not require any subject-matter expertise. You are only being asked to do a cursory evaluation of the question, like a field medic would triage patients. We have a detailed guide to Triage here; as you can see, it says: The primary goal of Triage is to quickly sort potentially-problematic posts into categories that can be routed elsewhere. ...


5

I can see why you might argue that this is ambiguous, I think that it's still on-topic and adds information to the post. Even if it could refer to several different specific data structures, it's still a general category of data structures. In fact, Wikipedia gives list as an example of an abstract data type. There are also high-rep users who have answered ...


4

Solved I have managed to find a (sort of) solution for my issue after consulting with several persons who had similar issue in the past: if the software is still in testing phase, Works Council should not be involved if the software is 100% opt-in (the employee can do their job perfectly fine without it, they use it or not as they see fit), Works Council ...


4

Votes are meant to be anonymous; users won't know who upvoted [including the OP] their answer. Checkmarks [accepted answers] are always done by the OP; you already know if the OP positively reviewed your answer if the OP accepted that answer.


4

I cannot say it any better than Hans Passant did, so I'm going to quote him: Let's not. "Stripe" is the company, stripe-payments and stripe-connect are the existing tags for their products. We do not encourage users to ask questions about a company. Thus, for now, based on the information that is available to me, I'm declining this request. If you ...


3

We're not going to be making any other changes to the experiment while it is running, which only has another week to run anyways. We'll consider all the odd scenarios during our analysis afterwards and during any conversations for further experiments, if those ever come about.


3

No, this should not exist. Leaving a comment is useless. It doesn't solve any of the problems with the post. The goal of this review queue is to solve the problem, not kick the can down the road. Once a post completes review, it's pretty much permanently enshrined on the site. We don't want to risk leaving poor-quality posts in that permanent state. If, ...


3

Since your aim is not to see closed questions, simply search for closed:no as well as your existing tags or other search terms. That way you’ll only see open questions and you won’t need to read the titles at all.


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