76

No, it wasn't wrong for you to roll back the edit. It was wrong for the other user to rollback the question again. Not all changes made by the OP are appropriate, and if the OP harms a post, it's appropriate to roll back that harmful change. That you had posted an answer is certainly cause for you to be careful, and see if you are in fact biased, but it ...


69

That massive edit removed a lot of background information from the answer. It goes against the intentions of the user (you), so I rolled it back. Keep in mind that you can always roll back edits on your posts if you disagree with them.


68

A rollback is not interpreted as an edit that turns the post into what it was at an earlier point in time, requiring all of the validation that would be required to make such an edit. A rollback turns the post into what it was at that point in time, no questions asked.


61

Deleting necessary portions of a post is considered vandalism, pretty much regardless of the motivation. So, deleting a large chunk of code that is necessary to understand the question and required to keep the answers coherent, well, that's vandalism. Vandalism should either be reverted by rolling back the edit, or, when that fails, flagging the post for ...


54

That's my fault. Anyone can suggest an edit, and I thought that extended to rolling back edits too. I should have accepted your flag when I rolled the question back to its original state. You should definitely flag these if you don't have enough reputation to do the rollback yourself yet. Sorry about the confusion.


43

Users with more than 2K reputation can rollback any post, it is part of the full edit privilege. The rollback option is available for these users in the edit history of the post: Users having less than 2K reputation, can flag the post for moderator attention using "Other" option and describe that the post is being incorrectly edited and requires a rollback, ...


38

It seems to violate the system of checks and balances for suggested edits. Yes, but that system is already screwed. If you are thinking about whether or not to roll it back, your opinion is already better than two robo-reviewers. If you find a blatantly terrible edit like that, certainly roll it back. If you aren't quite sure, don't do anything before ...


33

This was down to me being an idiot, and was not caused by a bug in the redaction tool. The link to the "redact" tool is in the same list of links as the "rollback" option. Instead of clicking "redact" for revision 4, I instead clicked "rollback" (and the successive "confirm" dialog). This misclick, coupled with the fact that the diff for each revision on a ...


31

Yes, because otherwise the question would become too broad. The user should open a second question instead.


30

First off, in a high traffic tag, I wouldn't worry about it too much, at least initially. Users crawling the "active" page will see it and fix it most of the time. Failing that, or if you feel industrious, you should just paste in the old markup as a suggested edit. Use "rollback to revision X" as the comment, though it should be pretty easily approved. If ...


30

No, there is no way to pretend you never did anything, and that's status-bydesign. You can manually undo all your changes in the grace-period though, which changes the empty revisions edit-summary to [Edit removed during grace period]. Currently, the edit-notification is not squashed, for whatever reason. Why a rollback to the pre-edit version in the grace-...


30

Your rollback was fine, and the comment to the editor was good. We have very good reasons for not allowing low-rep users to inline images, and people should not be "helpfully" inlining useless images like that.


30

The question's score is at odds with the answers' scores, so I suspect another opinion is needed. So... In the event of an edit war, the best version should be chosen This is the policy I personally go by, though I appreciate that Stack Overflow is different. What does this mean? Well, it means that instead of automatically deferring to the OP's version, ...


28

When a post is edited, you can roll it back. You click on the "edited ... ago" link, and then you see the revision history. The edit history has a grey bar above each edit, with the comment that the editor made, and buttons for "edit", "rollback" and "link". If you hit the "rollback", the post will revert to that particular edit. The first time you do ...


26

No please absolutely do not add something like NO ANSWER YET to the question title. Just as adding tags to the title is discouraged, and adding [SOLVED] to the title instead of accepting an answer is discouraged, placing text in the title to beg for additional views is discouraged and will very likely result in some downvotes while certainly resulting in the ...


24

Don't flag the question: moderators aren't here to deal with edit inaccuracy. If you have editing privileges, the best thing here would be to roll back the edits, which you can do from the edit history of a post: Otherwise, you can use the revision dropdown given to you in the edit page: Selecting a prior revision will show you the post's source at the ...


24

Is the appropriate recourse to this edit to roll-back to the previous version in order to provide the LQP review queue context as to why it was flagged NAA to begin with? Otherwise, future reviewers may not see this and mark the post as "Looks Okay". Yes, this is absolutely the right way to go. That edit completely changed the nature of the answer, but all ...


23

Things other than clicking "rollback" that will roll back a post to a previous revision: clicking "edit" from the revision history on a previous revision and submitting the edit. picking a previous revision from the revision drop-down on the full (not inline) editor. overriding a previous approval of a suggested edit (only possible for post owners and mods)


20

My apologies. I started trying to add a little more structure to the answer and it developed into a bigger change. Creating a new answer would have resulted in 90% duplication of content, which I didn't think would have helped readers. If you are really unhappy with the update then I won't be offended if you want to rollback – I'll repost as a ...


20

Usually, this is the result of someone rolling back an edit, then having second thoughts or realizing that perhaps that edit was fine after all, and undoing their rollback. If they start to do this repeatedly, they may be trying to bump their post or something. That's when, perhaps, a flag is warranted.


19

It's entirely your decision. There's nothing inherently wrong with that kind of edit. If you genuinely don't feel it's an improvement and prefer the original then feel free to roll it back however.


19

We should not cater for answerers who do not try to understand the actual problem, but instead roll up their sleeves and apply their only known problem-solving hammer to each problem they see (in this case: regular expressions). Because that would mean we cannot edit any question where any answer has been posted that refers to any content from the question, ...


19

This one is a clear rollback; the OP mentions specifically in the post that the extra spaces in the markup are not only a key part of what he is asking about, they are exactly what he is asking about. You'd have to not read the post to miss that. You should roll the edit back and leave a comment for the editor that removed the spaces indicating--politely--...


18

Roll back the OP's edit that changes the question into a new question. If they complain, explain that the rule is "one question per question."


18

The response is not to get further involved with the OP and Mod flag it with an explanation of what occurred. Let the moderator handle the situation. There is no point in getting into an edit war. The post would probably be locked with a content dispute notice.


17

Yes it should be allowed. A rollback is little more than a special kind of edit. There's no sense in preventing more edits to the same post. Since the other user had full editing privileges (> 2k rep), they didn't have to wait for their edit to be approved like your suggestion had to. You too can suggest an edit that is effectively a rollback. You ...


17

The user has a fresh Archaeology badge. What a surprise! Considering that the user didn't actually deface the posts in question, the most likely motivation for them to perform those redundant edits was to gather badges. I know it's not straightforward, but it should be possible to confiscate badges that are obtained by blatant gaming of the system. As far ...


16

First, is a user defaces their post, roll it back. If they do it again, roll it back again and flag for moderator attention. The vote to close has no bearing on the actions needed on the post; if anything, that doesn't help the chances of the question getting reopened if a lot of valuable context is ripped out. You did the right thing, now it's up to the ...


16

We should keep it as it is. There are two potential reasons to consider a rollback here, neither of which are sufficient: Should we rollback because the editor should not have made such a drastic change? Consider the edit-rejection reasons: spam or vandalism This edit defaces the post in order to promote a product or service, or is deliberately ...


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