68

Flagging is the appropriate action here. The moderator will redact the revisions affected by the sensitive information, hiding them from everyone who might see it; another moderator will then review and approve the redaction. An internal log is kept of these redactions to prevent abuse. Sometimes the moderators may choose to omit the redaction and instead ...


61

In spite of all the downvotes on his answer, nicael is absolutely correct - the notion that privileged users would have to vote to close was a somewhat late addition to the Stack Overflow system: As an active Stack Overflow user, one of the abilities you’ll gain at 3,000 reputation is the ability to close and reopen questions. Closed questions don’t allow ...


54

Don't put EDIT or other similar monikers in your posts. Every post on Stack Overflow has a detailed, time-stamped edit history that anyone can review, so EDIT is just unnecessary noise. If you really want to visually indicate that additional material was added, use a separator line, like the one I put above. This is done by putting three dashes at the ...


44

I've redacted the revision with the API key in the image and the revision in the other question that contained the API key as text; not sure what happened here, but the mods are discussing it. FWIW, this sort of redaction is at best a courtesy - a show of good-faith on our part. As Hans notes, there's really no way to get information like this off of The ...


38

We do, but you'll need to contact us directly. Let us know: The link to the question itself In what revision something was posted that shouldn't have been What that something is so we can look for it That you're certain the current version of the question is acceptable We may, depending on which revision it is, have to delete all but the current revision, ...


38

Declining the flag is not the action I would take here. Any posting of personal information like home addresses, phone numbers, medical records (yes, people do post those as sample data), and so on should be brought to the attention of moderators. Even if it's a false alarm, I appreciate being able to review that. I mark all of these flags as helpful, unless ...


37

In the dark old times, there was no close voting... but closing. Any user with required privileges could close a question and probably choose multiple dupe targets (sure there was such a possibility, which could be even achieved with a hack, but anyway: you'll find many such questions there or on MSE...) Earlier, when a question was closed as dupe, the dupe ...


37

The difference is in a single carriage return character. To test, I downloaded both revisions using the source link and diffed them in a hex editor. Ignoring the differences in the GUID in the title tag in the header, we can see that in revision 5 79 0A 0D 0A became 79 0D 0A 0D 0A. This white space appears between the following two line in the revision. ...


35

It's unlikely to be a bug... it's probably Jeff hacking the DB in the early days of SO. I'd guess that he deleted a revision from the PostHistory table but didn't backfill the change to the denormalised version in the Posts table that's (probably) used to render the question page. Data.SE (probably) confirms this hypothesis. The LastEditorUserId in the ...


35

Again, my answer is: Depends. I'll explain why. Learning from mistakes can be very helpful sometimes, especially when we don't always look at the answer's history. For example, you might come across an answer that had an initial approach, which was then corrected (to a very similar one), but you were not aware of the original mistake. Now you understand ...


34

The original revision of the question (i.e. the state the question was first posted in) was redacted by a Stack Exchange employee after it was found to contain sensitive information, leaving just duskwuff's edit as the only remaining revision. I don't remember if this usually leaves an empty stub in the revision history if it's a later edit that gets ...


33

Update: declined I'm declining this, as we just implemented a more generally-useful change to how grace periods are handled for editing that I think will suffice here as well... The trick is, you have to leave a comment if you want it to work. That doesn't mean you always need to comment when closing or deleting, but in situations that are likely to be ...


33

I'm flagging that for moderator attention. Both the OP and the other guy were misbehaving in those edits, and both could use a good chat with one of our esteemed overlords. Flagging for moderator attention is always an option in cases like these. Well, that was quick: deleted by Brad Larson♦ 12 secs ago and This account is temporarily suspended to ...


33

Yes, you can find who re-opened a question in the revision history of the question: https://stackoverflow.com/posts/<questionId>/revisions I use a userscript called "SEModifications" (github) to automatically add a link to the history (and timeline) in a question's footer: These links aren't available normally (a history link is only shown when ...


30

No, there is no way to pretend you never did anything, and that's status-bydesign. You can manually undo all your changes in the grace-period though, which changes the empty revisions edit-summary to [Edit removed during grace period]. Currently, the edit-notification is not squashed, for whatever reason. Why a rollback to the pre-edit version in the grace-...


29

You handled it the correct way, edit out the details and then use an "Other" flag explaining that the revision history contains sensitive details that should be removed. When a moderator reviews the flag, we will request that a member of the community team remove the revision history from the question we will redact the revision. Starting in Feb 2016 ...


27

Just reproduced on this post (see review and revision history). If a reviewer clicks Improve Edit, and then clicks Save Edits without making any changes, their edit is still submitted and looks like that. However, it they clear the "Edit summary" field before submitting the edit, it won't appear in the revision history. I think this is a bug and needs to ...


27

You can either use the revision history of the question, as mentioned by Cerbrus, or use the timeline: https://stackoverflow.com/posts/<POST ID>/timeline


25

From this answer to "Simultaneous editing (exact same timestamp) - no warning when overwriting other edit" by zxq9: My understanding is that both commits should be accepted, the latest one takes precedence, overriding the other. Both are in the revision history. In what is essentially a wiki system this is much better than mysteriously rejecting the ...


25

"Txt spk" is frowned upon, and should be edited out. We're a site for professionals (and enthusiast amateurs). "U" and other forms of "txt spk" are not professional. So, please use proper English in your posts. And if you see someone use "txt spk" or "l33t spk", by all means convert it to proper English! The only thing we don't do is changing American ...


22

If someone is totally rewriting their answer like in your provided screenshot, then yes, that should be deleted. That's what the revision history is for. If they are using it for emphatic, contextual effect, like intentionally showing a word and then crossing it out and showing a better more appropriate phrase, that kind of strike-through should stay (...


21

The moderator redaction tools aren't necessarily straightforward, and they definitely can take a little walking-through to get right. They also can have some fun edge cases, because of their ability to rewrite post history. I agree that better documentation is needed, and that's one of the things that we're using the internal Stack Moderators team site for. ...


17

Dear Flaggers, Please include all relevant information when flagging something for us. If a user has completely changed the question, tell us that in the flag. Flagging is really no different than asking a question: If you want help, you need to share what you know so that we know how to help.


17

Nope. There's too much potential for abuse. Users could completely wipe a question's history, if they decide they no longer want to have the question online. This would only add to the already large pile of stuff moderators will have to deal with.


16

This is caused by the following CSS rule: .originals-of-duplicate li { cursor: move } which is part of a recent feature that allows users with moderation privileges to rearrange duplicate links. Ostensibly, this CSS rule is leaking into the revision history where it doesn't belong, and something needs to be changed, be it the class name(s) being used, or ...


15

Anything that you could possibly do in response to such an edit would simply be you (and possibly others) wasting your time. Trying to revert an edit that changed nothing is spending effort accomplishing nothing. There's no need to roll it back, it's certainly not worth the time of a mod or employee to intervene, and it's not like the edit actually harmed ...


15

This will nearly always be a non-issue. As Bill pointed out, the specific example you reference was disputed anyway - which will never penalize you as the flagger. But even if that wasn't the case, even if the flag had been declined, this wouldn't matter unless you were fantastically unlucky and started encountering and flagging these answers all the ...


15

You're looking at two very different questions and asking why they weren't handled consistently. I wonder why you think they would have been. The first is an old, off-topic question that survived on the site for way too long because we were tired of people asking for the same list of book recommendations every day. The list grew to the point of being ...


14

I disagree with the point that the revision history is garbage. It is a record of all edits consequential and otherwise and done by whom (a number of minor edits can even be suggested or made by other privileged users). They are not directly visible to a user unlike questions/answers and are viewed only by people looking for it to see who and when the ...


13

I'd love to see a feature for moderators (or possibly high-rep users) to "flag" a question as "containing credentials". A moderator or enough users doing this would trigger an automated message to the creator of the question reminding him to change whatever credentials he posted as soon as possible. Of course that message would have to be displayed in a ...


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