147

Eliminating downvoting would pretty much kill the site. There would be no way to vet content otherwise. Vetting content for quality is the whole reason the site was founded; it's the antidote to Internet forums, which are a vast wasteland of suck. If the goal of downvoting is to collectively object to an inappropriate question, there are already several ...


57

As you stated, "the goal of downvoting is to collectively appraise the merit or quality of a question". I believe it does in fact accomplish this goal. I see no reason why this has anything to do with explanation, favoriting or badges. Case in point, I have downvoted this question because I disagree with its premise. And, looking at the total, it ...


48

It really hurts me that you would even think of such a proposal. Removing downvoting would destroy Stack Overflow. Accusing us of using downvotes in an evil way is really upsetting. Voting is not toxic behaviour. It is the necessary means to moderate the content and keep useful content relevant. There are no better ways of saying "this post is unhelpful ...


44

If the goal of downvoting is to collectively object to an inappropriate question, there are already several and better ways to achieve the same end, such as flagging and moderator intervention. Flagging isn't feasible, because of the simple fact that no amount of moderators will be able to keep up with the flags. If the goal of downvoting is to ...


34

There were two reviewers who rejected your proposed change. One of them was banned from review because of failed audits shortly after rejecting your change. I manually banned the other reviewer with a message explaining their mistake. I don't know if there's much else to be done to prevent this sort of problem. Possibly the reviewers didn't see the change ...


34

Others have left more substantive feedback on this post, but I wanted to call out two specific things here. Asking, editing, moderating, answering, or commenting on a question all require effort, whereas downvoting doesn't. It's just a lazy alternative to substantive engagement, leaving no beneficial artifacts for the poster nor the community. I will agree ...


26

Negative feedback is crucially important for maintaining a site where the stated purpose is "working together to build a library of detailed answers to every question about programming." In our current system, downvotes are (designed to be) used to indicate that something is wrong with some content. It could be that it's poor quality, or hard to ...


24

There are several good reasons to apply the change retroactively, which I think make an overwhelming case when taken together: The previous change, from awarding 10 points per question upvote to awarding 5, applied retroactively. Consistency with that precedent suggests this one should apply retroactively, too. Besides being an incentive, part of the ...


23

If you feel that a user continuously submits bad suggestions/drafts I would flag for moderator attention, explaining the situation and linking to the accepted and rejected proposals. A moderator will evaluate and may implement a suggestion ban on the user for suggesting too many poor edits. Additionally, you can reach out to a moderator in chat as outlined ...


17

Your main argument in comments under other answers seems to be that the possibility of a few people voting for the wrong reasons (e.g. personal reasons or biases about the user, not the content) cause such a big problem that nobody should be allowed to vote. (You even made an analogy to gun control in a comment.) This argument is flawed because voting and ...


13

I suspect that one of the things worth thinking about, as much as the horror of obvious disapproval, is the goals of downvoting. Quite a few site mechanics (reputation is the obvious one, but consider deletion) kind of rely on the downvote as a precursor and these are fairly integral to the quality control processes of the network. As much as we don't want ...


11

If you are suggesting that a new / low rep user's post should first be reviewed by others (possibly 3 - 5?) in the community before they can be seen / answered, it is a very bad idea. Not all new / low rep users post bad content. Having another queue would put additional burden on people between 100-200 rep. Your assumption that people between rep 100-200 ...


10

I'm unable to speak for others, so this is only my personal opinion. With that understanding I'll attempt to address some of the points presented in the question. As my own aside: most of what's said here about downvoting also applies to upvoting. Even before reaching the arguments I was tripped up by one bold assumption. Downvoting is not, for me, the most-...


10

I might agree that the way downvotes are used, especially as it fits within the rest of the site, is not always ideal and in some cases might even be deeply flawed and can make well-meaning users feel unwelcome. But I do not think removing the ability to downvote is a good way to deal with that, because downvotes exist exactly because not everyone is well-...


8

Your change was rollbacked if you see here. Explanation given by user: A change is being rolled back because: This edit doesn't make sense in this context. There is nothing to mitigate (the original example is perfectly fine) here. The posts point is that a when expression does not unwind a stack. Adding the 'resolution' is confusing to readers, ...


7

This was just pushed out. Now, you'll see any reject votes while the proposed change is being reviewed. I've also made it so you'll see your own "approve" votes on in-progress reviews, too, as it was a little unclear before (only the "approve" button was green, but disabled).


6

This is rolling out now. When a proposed change is loaded, you'll have around 5 minutes before someone else can be assigned to it. Any action you take (approve, reject, skip) will release the change back into the available pool, provided it's still reviewable.


4

Rejected proposals now remain listed in your profile (as drafts).


4

So, this was intentional but confusing (retagged bug because it was literally so confusing we didn't realize it was intentional -_-). In essence: we want to show any reject votes immediately we also want to explain why you can't review a second time These two combined into a very weird rule that basically meant you could always see reject votes, and never ...


4

This has been enabled now. If a change has a rejection vote for copied content, and is still eligible for review, the following banner will appear: If there are multiple copied content votes, and the have different links, each link will displayed. Any non-link comments will be listed as plain text.


4

This should have been rejected as "too specific". But for somewhat different reasons than you mention. It is posted in the "email" tag, but it is about a specific third-party API. If that API had a tag of its own, it should have been posted there. If the Documentation item was about the builtin email support of a language or framework, it should be posted ...


2

A fix for this rolled out Sunday evening. Thanks!


2

Latest build allows anyone with access to the queue to see all history (not others' skips, though).


1

I did the same thing. As it turns out, the version IS the change. What the change is saying is that this applies to C# versions 2-6 (as opposed to versions 5-6, which is what it was before the proposed change). This is actually what brought me here--I came across one for Enum in C# (See screenshot). I had thought that those version numbers were talking ...


1

It looks like changes are afoot There’s a backlog of about 2,000 proposed changes (vs something like 22,000 total changes reviewed). Some of this is too much content from over-enthusiastic users, some of it is presentation in the UX having too much friction, and some of it is the system limiting trusted users more than it should. There are planned ...


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